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You don't have to have the engine running, just run it for 10 minutes, bring it back then shut off and check the level.

The sampling rate can be increased to 1 per/s, maybe it's the bluetooth transponder limitation.
Here's a trick, turn OFF the engine datalogging if you haven't already. Possibly turn off any extra datalogging variables you don't need.
I do this by default, it speeds up the sampling rate.
 

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Discussion Starter #62
good morning! Well getting back to it and am ready to tackle the beehive. Doesn't look too awful ...maybe a little but with the wheel off and the splash guard pulled back, it looks like you can get to the lower hardware. Still have to pull the battery and ECM tho. So I'm looking back at the thread and see that I did not buy the thermostat you mentioned early on...but in looking at the shop manual, it sounds like the beehive and the inline thermo is actually an oil warmer system. Since this thing is running hot, I guess I'm not too worried right now that f the oil warmer is functioning unless the failure mode could be that its stuck open and causing it to run hot...do you think that could be happening?
 

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Morning. You should be fine with the stock thermostat, it can be replaced later. The Beehive, filter swap, oil changes should drop the temps significantly.

I looked more at the log. I should correct what I said, when it slips the expected gear ratio and actual are different, all other times they looks pretty good. This is the pushbelt or forward clutch discs. It's most definitely slipping. The torque converter slippage is slightly there too, but it's the difference in expected rpms at the Primary and Secondary shafts, based on the gear ratio it's expecting. When you slipped, it was expecting 0.95 gear ratio, and you got 0.81.
 

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good morning! Well getting back to it and am ready to tackle the beehive. Doesn't look too awful ...maybe a little but with the wheel off and the splash guard pulled back, it looks like you can get to the lower hardware. Still have to pull the battery and ECM tho. So I'm looking back at the thread and see that I did not buy the thermostat you mentioned early on...but in looking at the shop manual, it sounds like the beehive and the inline thermo is actually an oil warmer system. Since this thing is running hot, I guess I'm not too worried right now that f the oil warmer is functioning unless the failure mode could be that its stuck open and causing it to run hot...do you think that could be happening?
The beehive serves both to bring the fluid up to temperature and to keep it cool. For a CVT to operate properly, it can not be too cold or too hot, as the fluid needs simultaneously do many things: lubricate the transmission, provide hydraulic pressure, provide grip on the pulleys, transfer heat, etc. The balancing act the fluid needs run is why it is so important to change it.

Think of the beehive as a passive temperature regulator, rather than a cooler or heater. When the engine coolant is warmer than the CVT fluid, as at startup, it will bring it up to temperature. When the CVT fluid temp is more than the coolant, as in normal operation, the coolant flowing through the beehive cools the fluid. The thermostat you need to be concerned about is the engine thermostat, as that could result in the coolant not being the correct temp. If you have an external cooler, you need a thermostat to keep the fluid from being too cold.
 

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He's running the stock Beehive I believe. With an auxilliary cooler he still wouldn't need a thermostat, he could use the stocker. The oil flows would be split amongst the Beehive cooler and auxilliary oil cooler. Considering how restrictive the cheap oil coolers are, the flow balance is probably close between Beehive and aux cooler though it's impossible to say without a flow meter, thus over cooling doesn't seem to be a risk. Most likely the cooling problems will be resolved just with these simple changes, mine were, with the an exception.

The trick is overheating when on boost/throttle. I don't see that in the logs per say, I simply see a quick heat soaking pointing to restricted internal oil cooling or limited oil flow in the cooling circuit. The datalogs will tell the story quickly as this is an indication of massive CVT pushbelt slippage if the temps instantly start climbing. The engine coolant temp can also be logged but I'm thinking it's not an issue but can't confirm it. If the temps cannot be controlled when pushing the engine hard even with these corrective actions, then it means the CVT is probably toast.

Let's see how he progresses.
 

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Discussion Starter #66
Wellllll...stand by. The beehive didn't include an o-ring. I thought I could use the original so didn't think much of it when I noticed it. But - the original expanded to the point that it couldn't be fit into the groove. Need to source an o-ring now. Its always something. :rolleyes:
 

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He's running the stock Beehive I believe. With an auxilliary cooler he still wouldn't need a thermostat, he could use the stocker. The oil flows would be split amongst the Beehive cooler and auxilliary oil cooler. Considering how restrictive the cheap oil coolers are, the flow balance is probably close between Beehive and aux cooler though it's impossible to say without a flow meter, thus over cooling doesn't seem to be a risk. Most likely the cooling problems will be resolved just with these simple changes, mine were, with the an exception.
With most of the tiny coolers, I'm sure you are right from a cooling perspective. The colder oil in the cooler might create flow issues in a place like WI, although I am not sure exactly how fluid moves through it. If you are -25 F, you also might want to keep all the heat you can get.

It's easy to forget that 22.4 liters of air is just ~29 grams, which less than a shot glass of water... you have to move a lot of air to get as much cooling capacity as the amount of water going through the beehive, even if the temperature differential between the fluid and the coolant isn't as great.
 

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Right, cold oil is restrictive but also you want to heat it up. I am all for the stock CVT oil pre-heater setup. Cold CVT fluid will burnup the pushbelt in no time flat. You want to bounce to 80-90*C as fast as possible without pushing the car hard, then hold it there.

The Beehive is simply too small, in addition to having a low coolant flow rate passing thru it. The oil pump flow you can't do too much about, but a bigger cooler with much more water counter flow achieves the same thing. That's what I'll be running.
 

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create flow issues in a place like WI
well with this 5th warmest July on record averaging 6 degrees warmer than average and something like 22 out of the 26 days so far in July being above 90F... I might have to reconsider my decision to not do a CVT cooler.

Anyway, I'm just here to see the outcome of this thread, sorry to go off topic.
 

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Discussion Starter #70
Well, this is unexpected...it appears you can't get the o-ring from Nissan without buying the beehive (for princely sum of over $600 bucks) and none of the two-port coolers on e-bay seem to include the o-ring. However, most of the 4-port coolers include the o-ring. So, and I hate this idea, could a guy install a 4-port cooler and cap off the two extra ports? I'm not sure how I'd go about doing that and have it be a reliable cap-off but I'm kind of at a loss over this o-ring issue. I was hoping (knowing there was really no chance) that the original would return to its normal size but no such luck. Anybody have suggestions on where to find the o-ring or other thoughts? Never expected that thing to be such a problem. This is kuh-razy!! o_O
 

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I would get out the caliper and measure it and then buy the right size. Remember that it will squish down when you tighten it down.
 

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Yep, McMaster will work out nicely. My go-to for O-rings.....and basically everything.
 
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Discussion Starter #73
Hey there guys...man I never saw so many o ring options. U can even get mil spec stuff! Wow. So..with options often comes confusion..especially when you're as thick as me .🤓

So given that we're talking about CVT fluid...will the basic oil resistant ones work or should I be looking at a different material for that doggone beehive? Thanks gents!
 

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Viton is fuel oil/fuel resistant.
 

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Discussion Starter #75
BTW...I've got the Logging Frequency Limit set at unlimited; I'll try it at max once per second ... here goes
Well, I had this thing copied into Excel and all nicely formatted but I guess I should have checked to see if you can attach Excel spreadsheets first. Unfortunately, I could only attach this text file. Anyway, I found the o-rings from McMaster Carr (thanks for the heads up) and buttoned everything back up yesterday. It still runs hot after a short while, settling in at around 100-103 C. I logged a fairly lengthy drive covering a few back roads, some town driving and a few miles on the interstate (though not long enough to see if it would go into limp mode). So, its a pretty big file and hopefully comprehensive enough to be revealing. Look forward to seeing what you think! As always, many thanks!
 

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Hello all, new member here. I searched the site for this issue but didn't really find a thread that was quite on point for what we experienced recently. We were making a roughly 350 mile trip on the interstate and we experienced pretty much a total loss of power on the freeway. Outdoor temperatures were probably in the mid-to-upper 80's; so its not like we were cruising through Death Valley. We went from 85 to 50 almost immediately and continued to slow almost to the point of getting rear ended. You could pin the accelerator pedal to the floor but all you would get is increased engine rpm and the car would continue to slow down. So we hopped off (well, limped off actually) at the nearest exit and waited for 20 minutes or so and proceeded in hopes that cooling it down would help; which it did for a while. Later we had to pull off again and wait it out a couple more times. The first interval was around 150 miles or so...second was around 80 miles. Similar threads seem to point to a TCM component that is designed to protect the transmission from overheating damage. So, I'm wondering if this was actually transmission "slippage" or the car flipping into "limp mode"; which would beg the question of why was it getting hot enough to go into protection mode? This leads me to wonder if I need to install a tranny oil cooler?

Other commentary suggests that a CVT fluid change may correct the problem...or at least what sounded like similar problems. Any chance this is related to a bit of over-due maintenance??

We purchased the car used so are not sure of its maintenance history. However, we do know that its bone stock with no tweaks to turbo boost, transmission performance, etc. Just a nice little stock Juke with about 110K miles on the clock.

As I mentioned, I did try to search for something that seemed to fit our situation but didn't come across a good match in previous threads. So, if I could ask for your input, it would be very much appreciated.

Thank you!
I had the exact same problem, me and my wife would take weekend vacations, small trips out of town, going through mountains in colorado doing 80 and 90 mph, mine would slow down to a crawl, until I pulled over and let it cool down. I did a basic drain and fill, the fluid was dark, real dark, I changed it and havent had a problem since, no whining when very spirited driving( shifting manually) and I dont have to pull over an cool down any more.
 

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Hello all, new member here. I searched the site for this issue but didn't really find a thread that was quite on point for what we experienced recently. We were making a roughly 350 mile trip on the interstate and we experienced pretty much a total loss of power on the freeway. Outdoor temperatures were probably in the mid-to-upper 80's; so its not like we were cruising through Death Valley. We went from 85 to 50 almost immediately and continued to slow almost to the point of getting rear ended. You could pin the accelerator pedal to the floor but all you would get is increased engine rpm and the car would continue to slow down. So we hopped off (well, limped off actually) at the nearest exit and waited for 20 minutes or so and proceeded in hopes that cooling it down would help; which it did for a while. Later we had to pull off again and wait it out a couple more times. The first interval was around 150 miles or so...second was around 80 miles. Similar threads seem to point to a TCM component that is designed to protect the transmission from overheating damage. So, I'm wondering if this was actually transmission "slippage" or the car flipping into "limp mode"; which would beg the question of why was it getting hot enough to go into protection mode? This leads me to wonder if I need to install a tranny oil cooler?

Other commentary suggests that a CVT fluid change may correct the problem...or at least what sounded like similar problems. Any chance this is related to a bit of over-due maintenance??

We purchased the car used so are not sure of its maintenance history. However, we do know that its bone stock with no tweaks to turbo boost, transmission performance, etc. Just a nice little stock Juke with about 110K miles on the clock.

As I mentioned, I did try to search for something that seemed to fit our situation but didn't come across a good match in previous threads. So, if I could ask for your input, it would be very much appreciated.

Thank you!
I replaced my fluid an havent had a problem since.
 
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