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Maybe, maybe not. New CVT is $2100-$2300. Installed easily $4000-$4500. He got quotes already, buying used is his risk. Without an inspection and datalogging, all speculation at this point. If I had that transmission on my bench I could tell you exactly it's condition and what would fail or is failing. In a garage, I could do the same by datalogging it and dropping the valvebody. Since I don't, the OP is trying it to a certain extent, the same as a Nissan tech would. I forgot to mention the CVT deterioration counts that are captured, that's another thing to look at to see the high temp exposure time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Hey pboglio... so no I'm not gonna buy a used CVT...That was just the result of my research. Too many smart and experienced guys advise against it. Hoping the current track will be successful.

But...it is throwing a code...the guys at Advance were kind enough to scan it. BTW...the Amsoil is on the way and my OBD2 adapter arrived yesterday. What do you make of this cod
e scan?
188524
3695.jpeg
 

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Hmm, OK, that is very interesting.

Let's focus on that code because it's the only one I assume.

The torque converter has a big ole clutch like a manual transmission, the lock-up clutch. These typical can handle some serious abuse, they are fairly big or I should say large diameter. Basically, this is probably the strongest part of the entire CVT transmission, much higher than the pushbelt or forward clutch torque capacities. I will say you will burn up the pushbelt and forward clutches first by a long shot before you kill the converter clutch, which is an indication something odd is going on here. Since you don't have primary speed errors or secondary speed errors, I don't think those items are damaged enough to show slippage. Since the power flow goes thru all (3) in series, it must be something else.

If the computer didn't command lockup, it'd be heat generated by fluid shear or slippage. This isn't good, but it's also not a failing clutch either. This would tend to overheat the cellulose clutch disc but indirectly over a length of time, since the heat source is right next to it. The CVTz50 datalog would tell me exactly that the converter is completely "open" with a slippage of 125 rpm or whatever, it's a very specific slippage value that cannot be mistaken for a slipping converter clutch. This says that the computer wanted to lock it up, but couldn't. You will feel a lack of power, spongy power output or rubber band is another good term. When you have an open converter, it feels like a rubber band. This could occur from a failed lock-up solenoid on the valvebody. These solenoids burn up, another good reason to run good clean/cool oil.

OK, so what we really need is the CVTz50 datalog. I kinda prepped you for this. The valve-body I'm thinking will have to be dropped after the datalog if you want to go further. You've checked error codes, and it's very clear. The lockup solenoid is available from Sonnax or WIT transmission brand spanking new drop-in, it requires the valve-body removal as mentioned. Secondarily, the control "lock-up" piston inside the valve-body that the solenoid controls, the "slave" piston, could be jammed. Sonnax also have an upgraded TCC piston, but requires their custom reamer and basically a machine shop to ream the hole for the larger/better TCC control piston. Just saying these things are common to fail, but there are workable solutions that don't necessarily require a brand spanking new CVT or even new valve-body.

The reason why I mentioned the pressure port air check testing, is because there is this little $.30 o-ring on the end of the input shaft that seals pressure to the converter lock-up clutch. You have no hope of accessing this little guy without dropping the transmission. However it's easy peasy to run a 90 psi air-check with the valve-body removed to do the same thing by tapping the TCC apply pressure port the valvebody plugs into. IF it fails the air check, the transmission must be dropped to replace it and/or the converter. This step saves you the trouble.

So, AAMCO pg 48 shows the "TCC apply pressure" tap. You want to hit that with the rubber tip air gun with about 90 psi should do, normally the TCM sends 130 psi to it. IF it's air tight, that little o-ring is solid and not your problem.

Course of action:

1) CVTz50 datalog, read "slippage" rpm.
a) If converter "open", drop valvebody and test/or replace converter lockup solenoid with new from Sonnax, ebay, etc.
b) Also, with valve-body off conduct converter input o-ring seal integrity air-check using 90 psi air.
b) Re-install v-body/refill fluid, retest vehicle with CVTz50 datalog to eliminate converter slippage as potential failure mode.
c) Also, recheck for error codes via Actron or CVTz50.
2) If NOT corrected, possible new valvebody replacement required due to v-body lockup control piston jammed/clogged.
3) IF still NOT corrected with NEW or reman valve-body, possible converter failure.

For the labor involved, I don't recommend a converter only replacement with 110,000 miles. I sourced my reman converter from WIT transmission for $140 (CVC converter brand) vs. $1200 new OEM. So, there is an option but you gotta be willing to part with the labor cost just to still slap in a reman converter ($140 reman or $1200 new), rebuilt or new valve body ($450 to $750), & installation cost ($500-$1200).

Just go step by step.
 

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Just going to throw this out there: This is a LOT of running around and testing that could be avoided by just replacing the CVT. Time is money, even if your not paying for it... I am not saying not to do the diagnostics the right way. But. Solenoid codes at any repair center would immediately mean replace the CVT. It will take 4ish hours to do a valve body and belt/pulley inspection. It will take a few hours for someone who is new to all this to go through and read datalogs and interpret the data. It will take and has taken hours and hours of hoping on this forum, typing up everything, reading everything. Just replace the CVT. There is no sense in replacing one component on a CVT and leaving the rest. Even if it is a valve body issue, the belt/pulleys will give out. If it is over-heating, changing the fluid will just buy you a smidge more time. I am not "fearmongering" as it was put before, but being realistic. It takes a shop 8ish hours to replace the cvt, by the time you reach a conclusion you would have spent that time and possibly more to come to the conclusion that it is more economical to replace the cvt and have full peace of mind that your good for at least another 100k miles. Ive worked on more of these cars than probably anyone who is not a nissan tech, and I have replaced more CVT's in my personal garage for people who where getting over-charged at the dealership than I can even count. Ive done years of testing with changing fluids, different fluids, different coolers, changing to bigger fluid pans ect. and I am just presenting the information I have attained. Real world application is much different than theory. Jatco and Nissan can attest to that. CVT is great in theory, but absolute **** in mass production hahaha

Look at the A and B count. If it is over 1, replace the CVT.
If changing the fluid and adding a cooler does not prevent "overheating" or limp mode change the CVT
if you are getting ANY solenoid codes or any codes related to the torque converter, replace the CVT
If you have hard shifting or lazy take off, replace the CVT.
If you don't trust the cvt is operating like it used to, and you just want to not stress anymore and can toss the cash at a good nights sleep, replace the CVT.

Aside from the last one, this is how a CVT is treated at Nissan. On some models we would replace valve bodies for updated units and I can tell you over the course of a few years working at a dealership, more than half of those cars came back and needed a full cvt replacement. The Juke is not a CVT you can replace the valve body on to fix the issues the unit has. Your time is limited in this world. Spending hours and hours of it on something like a LONG and unnecessary diagnostic procedure that not even the dealership uses is up to you, but it seems like a massive waste of time and brain energy that could be used somewhere else.

Also (not meaning to be jumping around but this just popped in my head), at Nissan, when a car under warranty comes in with any sort of CVT or driveline related complaints, it is a 3-4 step diag process before Nissan corporate says "replace the CVT, its easier for us and the customer to get a new unit in there and not have anyone worry."

I have said my piece, whatever road you chose to take, best of luck to you, and I hope you get the issue resolved.
 

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Everyone wants to learn, they call that a hobby. To the rest, we will agree to disagree. The OP will find out very soon I think how far gone the transmission is. I'm not taking bets, because there isn't enough information to make an informed judgement call. I didn't know about the converter code, but I did reply it seemed likely based on the lack of other symptoms. Once the datalogs come back it'll be more clear what is happening.

To the rest, a bit confusing. I wouldn't necessarily be installing "big" turboski or whatever you call a big turbo upgrade on CVT owner cars if I didn't actually believe in these transmissions. So I find that ironic and not really a consistent message.
 

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To the rest, a bit confusing. I wouldn't necessarily be installing "big" turboski or whatever you call a big turbo upgrade on CVT owner cars if I didn't actually believe in these transmissions. So I find that ironic and not really a consistent message.
These transmissions hold up fine to big turbos if you drive them right and if you dont run them on the limit of their power. But the facts are the facts, the transmissions as a whole are crap lol. My local customer Angela has been running a big turbo for almost a year now at decent power, she does not beat the snot out the car and its running fine. My personal cvt juke had a vf48 on it for 2 years not at the cvts peak power, and i beat the snot out of it and the cvt was fine. I put a 16g on it ran it to its peak power and beat the bag out of it then the cvt started to slip. (my first cvt failure was related to a locked up actuator in one of the pulleys which does happen on these randomly, and that has nothing to do with the torque being put through them)

I am not sure what this has to do with the OP's issue.

These transmissions are what they are, and if someone wants to take the risk by running big power on the cvt, that is up to them. I have seen people say things about me "ruining cvts" with big turbos. I've only ever installed a big turbo on 4 CVT jukes. Mine, Angelas, Duanes, and Insane Juke. On my car, IDC if the cvt blows up over and over, it takes me a few hours to swap them, I have several vehicles to drive, and I have parts connections. Angelas: we ran a smaller vf48 to make more top end power and ran the torque very linear to be easy on the cvt but she is well aware of the risks and has funds put aside for if the cvt goes bad, but up to this point hers is holding up fine and she even wants to try upgrading to a 16g. Duane: at that time we had NO idea what the actual limits of the cvt where and he approached ME and wanted to find out, so we did, his first cvt of 100k miles did fail, but his second one is still working fine last I heard. Insane Juke: Mike wanted to see if we could push the CVT, so we overbuilt the engine and sent it. That CVT is still running and driving today, the new owner of the car has been emailing me over the past few weeks about the car. So idk who has been telling you the big turbo systems are blowing up CVT's but there are the actual facts for you haha.

Another fact: the first 330 horsepower Juke owner wanted over 300 and he had a CVT, so I convinced him to do a six speed swap to make the car reliable at big power. so he did. That car is still out there winning roll races to this day, i spoke to him a few weeks ago. If you read any of my emails that I send when people ask me about doing big turbo builds for them and I find out they have a CVT I issue the same warning: Above stock power you dramatically reduce the life of the cvt, I can get you to the power you want, but I recommend keeping money aside to replace the cvt if you plan on beating on the car. 9 out of 10 people then ask about a six speed swap and the other 1 out of 10 say thank you for your honesty and go on to ask about just bolt ons.

but again, not sure what this has to do with the OP and the fact that at the end of the day that CVT is on life support.

I get wanting to do this as a hobby and learn, but when it is someone's only mode of transportation and how they make a living by getting to work, getting the kids, or whatever, you don't play with it. you fix it. because when someone gets halfway through a patch repair, then accidentally make the problem worse (not saying this will happen but it does happen) then they are stuck with no car, no cash to repair it properly, that is when things get even more stressful for someone. I am not here saying the diagnostics you are suggesting are wrong. If anything I am impressed that you have taken the time to go this in depth into these transmissions. What I am saying is: you want to avoid creating false hope that doing one small thing here or one small thing here will resolve the issue. The entirety of the automotive world has found the solution to this problem: buy yourself time with a fluid swap, but you will need to replace the cvt eventually. That is what my Nissan dealership would advise, that is what the 2 other dealerships we where partners with would advise, that is what Firestone would advise, that is what joe smuchatellies auto repair would advise.

And please, in the future, avoid trying to mock me by mentioning me calling them "Turbski's" in a sarcastic way, I try to make this fun for some people, add a little humor to the **** show. So there is no need for that. And like with everything else: the internet does not hold all the facts. The internet does not see the day to day operation of my work. The active juke community online is only a SMALL portion of my customer base, so you don't see anywhere near the number of people I interact with on a daily basis, so please stop assuming things about how I do my job.
 

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@FastReligion and @pboglio Guys... calm down. Both of your knowledge is respected here in the community.
 

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@FastReligion and @pboglio Guys... calm down. Both of your knowledge is respected here in the community.
I am fine until my integrity as a builder is brought into question. I have been doing this for over a decade and have proved I know what I am doing. I set a goal with someone and we accomplish it. I am not the one who started personal attacks...I have actually complimented him several times about his knowledge and research he has done. I just do not think it is the right path for the OP, and I don't want someone to be stuck on the side of the road in their main mode of transportation.
 

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Matt,

I'm not mocking you, but I've seen a few things and I don't agree with them. The OP will figure it out, and when it makes sense the right decision will be made.
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
Hey Pboglio...so, parts and stuff (as well as demands of work and life) are in motion and filters etc should be here next week. But, I'm a bit at a loss for how to use, log and interpret this CVTz50 data. I might have a better chance of understanding Greek written in Russian. ;) The app and reader seem to work together properly and I'd like to capture those data logs you suggested; but I'm not quite sure how to go about it. Do I need to be driving the car? How do I make the app capture the data files?

BTW, to all concerned, I sure didn't mean to stir up a s*** storm here. I respect the knowledge and continue to be amazed by the willingness to support fellow Juke owners. I sincerely appreciate everybody's guidance and can't thank everyone enough. But, just so nobody thinks I've taken leave of my senses, I do most of my work myself and will be doing all of the fluid changes and filter replacements myself. So, I've only got $300 bucks into this so far. To me that's a fair gamble to take when the alternative is a $4K or $5K repair or getting rid of the car. Who knows how this will turn out but since I'll do most of my work myself, its worth a shot. Just think of all the beer money that might save! :D
 

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It is all good. There is always more than one way to fix a car per say.

At least we have people responding and giving options. A lack of response would be far worse.
 

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Hey Pboglio...so, parts and stuff (as well as demands of work and life) are in motion and filters etc should be here next week. But, I'm a bit at a loss for how to use, log and interpret this CVTz50 data. I might have a better chance of understanding Greek written in Russian. ;) The app and reader seem to work together properly and I'd like to capture those data logs you suggested; but I'm not quite sure how to go about it. Do I need to be driving the car? How do I make the app capture the data files?

BTW, to all concerned, I sure didn't mean to stir up a s*** storm here. I respect the knowledge and continue to be amazed by the willingness to support fellow Juke owners. I sincerely appreciate everybody's guidance and can't thank everyone enough. But, just so nobody thinks I've taken leave of my senses, I do most of my work myself and will be doing all of the fluid changes and filter replacements myself. So, I've only got $300 bucks into this so far. To me that's a fair gamble to take when the alternative is a $4K or $5K repair or getting rid of the car. Who knows how this will turn out but since I'll do most of my work myself, its worth a shot. Just think of all the beer money that might save! :D
Shoptowel,

I should apologize actually, that stuff should have been taken offline on my part.

OK, yes you can also have the car even idling or parked and it'll log too. We are looking for streaming data on the app live, you get that far it's easy to log at that point. If you boot up the app you'll find when you log and close out it's creating a delimited .txt file or something similar, gotta retreive that from your file folder on the phone. If you can screen shot the app we could step you thru it. As long as the Bluetooth is communicating then you are 95% there. Screen shots or short video and let's see what you got.

Definitely you have the right strategy. At some point you might say the heck with it and just buy a new CVT. At that point I actually might make a suggestions to have someone like WIT transmission install the upgraded oil pump and have that Nissan trans shipped directly to your mechanic. I don't know of any other shop I would trust, they are highly respected on anything CVT related. In fact, they could also install the other available CVT upgrades as well for not too much. I would NOT install a factory stock CVT in anyone's car. I think this is where I have my way of doing things and probably disagree with some.

Anyway, snap a few pics or vids of the app loading up and we can walk you thru.
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
torque converter has a big ole clutch like a manual transmission, the lock-up clutch. These typical can handle some serious abuse, th
Hey there pboglio...well, finally got the beehive and I think I figured out how to datalog in CVTz50 and attached the file...I want to pull another run and will attach that later. I plan to do the first two fluid changes today (would do the third and replace filters but I think I may have the wrong pan gasket....if it turns out to be the right one, I'll proceed with the filter and final change). Then do a data log between each one. Anyway...just busy busy busy and many competing priorities but I didn't want you to think I fell off the planet! :)
 

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That's awesome. Keep up the good work. I'll review what you have. When you get the Beehive on and the fluid flush done with the AMSOIL you will notice straight away a temperature drop and it should stay pretty reasonable even on long highway drives. Just post that up when you have the chance, no rush, just concentrate on the job.....lol. Those darned pan gaskets are tricky, I only buy the Nissan OE ones since the aftermarket are so varied, this is where I just spend the $30 and buy the best.

I'm so busy at work it's insane......good busy but there is a balance. Keep us posted.
 

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Reviewed the data. All the info is there, but you are in Park so not much to see. Keep in mind to "Delete" the existing files after you save them. What will happen is CVTz50 will append each run to the other. So if you dowload, then delete off your phone you can force a new file for that run only. Maybe there is a way to change that, but that's what I remembered.

OK few points to review:

1)
Line pressure must be higher than Pulley pressure, which it is.
I'll review mine to see what the Line pressure @ Park is, gotta pull up some logs.

2) Sec pressure and Trgt Pressure should be close with a bit of time delay, which it is mostly but at these low idle speeds it's a bit variable, normal.

3) Gear Ratio and Target Gear Ratio need to be very close, at idle they aren't but not worried about that. This is the "slippage" you will see or just plain wrong gear ratio selected if the valve body is goin wonky. In Park, nothing to see here basically.

4) The Lu_Prss is at -0.4 MPa or OFF, which makes sense in Park.

5) The Pri_Speed, Sec_Speed, Eng_Speed, & Slip Rev are: 64 rpms, 128 rpms, 640 rpms, and 127 rpms respectively.
The last number is normal when the torque converter is "unlocked" (i.e. idle up to 18 mph, etc.), you will see this 127 rpms as a clear indicator of exactly what the torque converter is doing. Engine speed is normal, this is the idle speed. Primary speed also is slipping (i.e. after the torque converter) to keep the car from moving forward, ideally would be 0. Secondary speed (i.e. after the forward/reverse clutch packs) is interesting. I do believe the forward clutch pack assembly is possibly dragging along with the primary shaft since there is no torque on the engine and the clutch disc gap clearances are almost zero. By the way, this is why I HIGHLY recommend NOT to free rev the engine on a CVT, because it'll burn up those clutches in short order, ask me how I know...lol. Need to see the car moving to make a better assessment, just noting the slight differences here but probably nothing to worry about.

6) Deterioration 78593 is interesting, seems a bit high. This is factored with mileage, rpms, times above 90*C temperature, etc. A count of 210,000 means time to change the CVT oil. I'll have to review the Service manual for specifics, I'll forward it to you.

One you have some data at speed, different styles (i.e. part throttle, couple WOT pulls, different driving modes (i.e. Norma, Sport, Manual mode, etc.), different gears (i.e. 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, & 6th), low speeds/higher speeds (i.e. about 30 mph)), then I can tell more. The best way to do this is drive in "Manual" mode, this locks up the gear ratios and makes things easy to log and review. "Drive" mode is too tricky to tell what's goin on but it works too, manual mode is easier. Basically, need a driving log to see what's really goin on, but the log file can be read, no problem.

Hopefully you can see that combined with any DTC trouble codes and the logging, you can pretty much disect a CVT's function in a dynamic fashion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
Reviewed the data. All the info is there, but you are in Park so not much to see. Keep in mind to "Delete" the existing files after you save them. What will happen is CVTz50 will append each run to the other. So if you dowload, then delete off your phone you can force a new file for that run only. Maybe there is a way to change that, but that's what I remembered.

OK few points to review:

1)
Line pressure must be higher than Pulley pressure, which it is.
I'll review mine to see what the Line pressure @ Park is, gotta pull up some logs.

2) Sec pressure and Trgt Pressure should be close with a bit of time delay, which it is mostly but at these low idle speeds it's a bit variable, normal.

3) Gear Ratio and Target Gear Ratio need to be very close, at idle they aren't but not worried about that. This is the "slippage" you will see or just plain wrong gear ratio selected if the valve body is goin wonky. In Park, nothing to see here basically.

4) The Lu_Prss is at -0.4 MPa or OFF, which makes sense in Park.

5) The Pri_Speed, Sec_Speed, Eng_Speed, & Slip Rev are: 64 rpms, 128 rpms, 640 rpms, and 127 rpms respectively.
The last number is normal when the torque converter is "unlocked" (i.e. idle up to 18 mph, etc.), you will see this 127 rpms as a clear indicator of exactly what the torque converter is doing. Engine speed is normal, this is the idle speed. Primary speed also is slipping (i.e. after the torque converter) to keep the car from moving forward, ideally would be 0. Secondary speed (i.e. after the forward/reverse clutch packs) couldn't possibly be higher than Primary and in Park it should be 0, if it were actually that value you would be creeping in park. I think it's the speed sensor baseline calibration being off. The clutch packs are disengaged on the forward drum, so is reverse, thus nothing is clutched and the shafts should be sitting there stopped. I believe the speed sensor is simply off, but also the forward clutch pack assembly is possibly dragging along with the primary shaft since there is no torque on the engine and the clutch disc gap clearances are almost zero. By the way, this is why I HIGHLY recommend NOT to free rev the engine on a CVT, because it'll burn up those clutches in short order, ask me how I know...lol. Need to see the car moving to make a better assessment, just noting the slight differences here but probably nothing to worry about.

6) Deterioration 78593 is interesting, seems a bit high. This is factored with mileage, rpms, times above 90*C temperature, etc. A count of 210,000 means time to change the CVT oil. I'll have to review the Service manual for specifics, I'll forward it to you.

One you have some data at speed, different styles (i.e. part throttle, couple WOT pulls, different driving modes (i.e. Norma, Sport, Manual mode, etc.), different gears (i.e. 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, & 6th), low speeds/higher speeds (i.e. about 30 mph)), then I can tell more. The best way to do this is drive in "Manual" mode, this locks up the gear ratios and makes things easy to log and review. "Drive" mode is too tricky to tell what's goin on but it works too, manual mode is easier. Basically, need a driving log to see what's really goin on, but the log file can be read, no problem.

Hopefully you can see that combined with any DTC trouble codes and the logging, you can pretty much disect a CVT's function in a dynamic fashion.
Thought that might be the case - I just took it for a spin...thrashed it hard...drove it easy...sat in park etc. trying to get a spectrum of operational conditions - here's the data file from that. It looks like it just appended the new data to the previous file...Thank you sir!! About to start changing the fluids now...
 

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Thought that might be the case - I just took it for a spin...thrashed it hard...drove it easy...sat in park etc. trying to get a spectrum of operational conditions - here's the data file from that. It looks like it just appended the new data to the previous file...Thank you sir!! About to start changing the fluids now...
Sounds good. I'll need an hour to review. Those pesky "Header" labels never line up with the data, makes it a bit harder to read the raw data but it can be fixed in Excel.
 

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OK, here goes:

Review:

Please kick the sampling rate up, I'm only getting 1 sample per 3 seconds, too slow.

Here's what I'm seeing: You are doing fine even up to 243 N-m, it doesn't slip, with an exception. What I'm seeing is on the "kickdown", it does initially slip a bit, otherwise it doesn't. That's why I need the sampling rate kicked up so I can see it initially slip, then lock in. A slippage of 3-11 rpms is nothing, double digits get's noticed and means something is up. You slipped once @ 43 rpms on 224 N-Mwhich is actually very high and you should have noticed it when it did.

[Edit: Further reviewed the logs and made some adjustments to my diagnosis in the following posts]
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
OK, here goes:

Review:

Please kick the sampling rate up, I'm only getting 1 sample per 3 seconds, too slow.

Here's what I'm seeing: You are doing fine even up to 243 N-m, it doesn't slip, with an exception. What I'm seeing is on the "kickdown", it does initially slip a bit, otherwise it doesn't. That's why I need the sampling rate kicked up so I can see it initially slip, then lock in. A slippage of 3-11 rpms is nothing, double digits get's noticed and means something is up. You slipped once @ 43 rpms on 224 N-Mwhich is actually very high and you should have noticed it when it did. Almost certainly the torque converter clutch is slipping on the transmission shift kickdown or something like that.

Also, when the clutch slips you just feel it as a "free rev" or mushy feeling. When the CVT pushbelt slips it's a hard "jerk" and then it "catches", nothing else feels like it. When you are just tooling around if the belt is always slipping it's that "rpm hunting/oscillation". I don't see that you have a slipping belt but I'm still reviewing.

So, what I'm seeing is the Primary shaft is spinning @ 2880 rpms (i.e. AFTER the torque converter). At the Engine I see 2944 rpms. They should be IDENTICAL if the torque converter is locked via the lockup solenoid, not good. Basically, the Torque converter lockup clutch is slipping. Whether the belt is slipping, I can review more later but it doesn't really matter. What's important to keep in mind is you want to see the Lockup pressure of about 0.78 Mpa, and you are actually getting it which rules that out. This is telling me the Torque converter clutch is glazed or worn out. The high CVT temps probably ruined the converter clutch, driving style, or whatever. Doesn't matter, it can't hold even stock torque on the kickdown. This also poses a problem for the forward clutches, as they are in the similar situation since they are made of the same material. The way in which it slips typically will determine if the forward clutches and/or CVT belt are also worn, since there is only the Secondary speed sensor it's difficult to tell what's going on.

The CVT oil pump is keeping up, whatever it's commanding you are getting to the belt. Sometimes this doesn't matter anyway if the belt is worn out, but at least the pump is still kicking out pressure, I saw as high as 4.25 Mpa though it'll go up to 5.5 Mpa max. Basically, the belt is getting the pressure the TCM is commanding, so that's a good thing. How worn out the belt is, I'm still reviewing.

Recommendations:

What to do here? Well, the AMSOIL will most definitely put a clamp on this slippage......it's a bandaid but I guarantee you it will put a death grip on it for now. IF the CVT pushbelt is OK, this will get you by for a long while until you can make a decision and gather up the funds. I need to review the logs more to see if this is a consequence of the torque converter slippage or additional slippage at the belt if any. The temps are not normal for the time you are driving the car, possibly unrelated but you are fixing it and that is the correct move.

When the belt is badly worn out, you will get an rpm surge that you can feel, as I mentioned previously. IF that's not the case, that's a very good sign that the CVT is probably salvagable, hard to say right now. My recommendation is that you need a new CVT transmission. If you had nothing but free time & labor, I'd attempt a converter clutch swap. No different than a manual trans clutch swap, just a little more work. Again, the datalogs will show how bad the CVT is worn everywhere else, I suspect it's still serviceable but need more data to confirm it. WIT transmission can supply you a factory reman torque converter from CVC completely rebuilt with new torque converter clutch disc, input spline adapter, o-rings, balanced, etc. for $140. I'm going to be running that same converter in my high H.P. build so I'll stand behind that recommendation, those guys recommended CVC and their failure rates are extremely low. A new CVT is going to run $2160 without shipping, a new converter was $1200. CVT Installed more like $3000 to $4500 depending on independant or dealership. You have to figure that out, but that is the reality.

The AMSOIL will get you by for awhile, maybe 8,000-10,000 miles. It's effective, and it'll work great as long as something doesn't physically break and you don't drive it hard, but it will work amazingly well to keep you going.

I'll keep reviewing the logs to see if the pushbelt is serviceable, this might determine how long you have on the transmission.
Thanks man...just finished draining and partial refill...quick question - I know you check the fluid level hot but is the engine supposed to be running too?
 
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