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Discussion Starter #21
Hey guys, just wanted to say thank you for your advice and input; with apologies for a little dose of OSU/Michigan rivalry that I couldn't resist. We'll have to decide what to do next but your inputs help immeasurably. Thanks again!
 

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Hey guys, just wanted to say thank you for your advice and input; with apologies for a little dose of OSU/Michigan rivalry that I couldn't resist. We'll have to decide what to do next but your inputs help immeasurably. Thanks again!
No problem. Post up. Post pics. We will be here.
 

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Hello all, new member here. I searched the site for this issue but didn't really find a thread that was quite on point for what we experienced recently. We were making a roughly 350 mile trip on the interstate and we experienced pretty much a total loss of power on the freeway. Outdoor temperatures were probably in the mid-to-upper 80's; so its not like we were cruising through Death Valley. We went from 85 to 50 almost immediately and continued to slow almost to the point of getting rear ended. You could pin the accelerator pedal to the floor but all you would get is increased engine rpm and the car would continue to slow down. So we hopped off (well, limped off actually) at the nearest exit and waited for 20 minutes or so and proceeded in hopes that cooling it down would help; which it did for a while. Later we had to pull off again and wait it out a couple more times. The first interval was around 150 miles or so...second was around 80 miles. Similar threads seem to point to a TCM component that is designed to protect the transmission from overheating damage. So, I'm wondering if this was actually transmission "slippage" or the car flipping into "limp mode"; which would beg the question of why was it getting hot enough to go into protection mode? This leads me to wonder if I need to install a tranny oil cooler?

Other commentary suggests that a CVT fluid change may correct the problem...or at least what sounded like similar problems. Any chance this is related to a bit of over-due maintenance??

We purchased the car used so are not sure of its maintenance history. However, we do know that its bone stock with no tweaks to turbo boost, transmission performance, etc. Just a nice little stock Juke with about 110K miles on the clock.

As I mentioned, I did try to search for something that seemed to fit our situation but didn't come across a good match in previous threads. So, if I could ask for your input, it would be very much appreciated.

Thank you!
It sounds like you've got a good amount of replies. Instead of telling you what "will" happen, I'll give you my story. Exactly what you went thru, my car went thru at maybe 5,000-10,000 mile mark, basically brand new. Whining, highway overheating, limp mode, etc. I was almost killed multiple times in my car because of the CVT. I then refilled to EXACTLY between the dipstick fill lines "hot" and completely eliminated that problems I was having. I attributed it to a factory underfill/overfill condition which causes massive havoc on oil foaming and oil pump cavitation. This same condition can happen on higher mileage CVT due to transmission case oil leakage. I've heard the CVT oil will degrade the silicon gasketing material, I would tend to believe it. I run Loctite 518 on my CVT rebuild/upgrade, which is completely impervious to CVT fluid. External coolers help and there are many threads on that subject, but proper fluid fill is much much more critical IMHO. A correctly filled CVT oil sump level will be whisper quiet, this is so important to the oil pump function and how it supplies hydraulic fluid to the valvebody control unit that it isn't stressed enough.

Could it be a failing transmission? Absolutely. If you feel slippage and it's NOT whining, then yes the transmission is gone. It will "jerk" especially in the higher gears on the expressway if the belt is slipping. IF you feel a "hunting" rpm where the engine rpm oscillates at constant throttle during cruise, then this is a very bad sign that the oil pump relief valve is worn out and not applying correct belt clamping pressure, wearing out the CVT belt. It's super common on these CVT transmission's, which are similar to the Altima, Jeep, Mitsubishi CVT. It's basically the achilles heal of this design and almost every CVT fails from this failure mode eventually. The valvebody ratio control piston also jams up, causing similar funky ratio control issues. If you are at this point the transmission is already gone. Another bad symptom is a delayed engagement from park to drive, like 2-3 seconds or more. If you don't have these symptoms..........the CVT isn't likely to be failing. If it whines, your fluid is either worn out, or the fluid level is incorrect.

They do overheat something fierce when the clutch packs and belt are worn out but it has to be pretty far gone for that to happen. What you described is common and fixable in most cases with a correct CVT fluid fill. I highly highly recommend AMSOIL CVT fluid and a brand new sump oil filter replacement & the cartridge filter replacement, maybe even a new beehive cooler too and CVT thermostat. I'm going to say right now IF you had a slipping transmission, the AMSOIL would pretty much kill the slippage in it's tracks, and it would run cooler too. That cartridge filter being clogged will massively limit CVT oil flow thru the beehive cooler.....and then you overheat. Deal with the basics first before worrying about a CVT failure just yet.

I'd say 110,000 miles is up there for a CVT, but if it's stock and unmodified, they can go further from what I've heard and members have reported as high as 200,000 miles. Juke CVT failures do happen but most are from morons running modified engines, myself included.....lol. Again, without a full transmission teardown it's so hard to say, but what you have described is classic and many people often mistake it for a failing transmission when many times it isn't. A failing CVT is sometimes difficult to diagnose, but the symptoms I mentioned give an indication of what might be going on as they are fairly common on the JF011E transmission the pre-2015 Jukes run.

Hopefully you have some info to start trouble shooting and if you don't feel comfortable take it to a qualified Nissan dealership. Also, I'd download the CVTz50 phone app and get an OBDII bluetooth plug so you can see the CVT temps, torque converter slippage, CVT belt slippage etc. If you datalog a run I could review it and check to see what's going on.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
I have to tell you guys, I'm amazed by the great community on this forum. Once again, thanks for all of the advice and info! So, I wanted to just kind of "point-by-point" respond to pboglio's post and to ask for a little clarification, etc.

On balance it sounds a little encouraging and I like the advice to try some of the basics first; but I don't want to go too far down that path and burn a lot of cash if its pretty certain that the tranny is wasted. Soooo, here goes:

If you feel slippage and it's NOT whining, then yes the transmission is gone. It will "jerk" especially in the higher gears on the expressway if the belt is slipping.
We're not hearing the whining at all. Which, from what you've said that may mean the tranny is done. However, we are not experiencing any of the jerking sensation -- we're only seeing the loss of power to the wheels. However, its a smooth lack of engagement - if that makes any sense. So, could that mean that what we're experiencing isn't actually a slippage and the transmission may still be recoverable?




IF you feel a "hunting" rpm where the engine rpm oscillates at constant throttle during cruise, then this is a very bad sign that the oil pump relief valve is worn out and not applying correct belt clamping pressure, wearing out the CVT belt . It's super common on these CVT transmission's, which are similar to the Altima, Jeep, Mitsubishi CVT. It's basically the achilles heal of this design and almost every CVT fails from this failure mode eventually.
We are not experiencing this hunting action at all. When the transmission operating normally (i.e., not in limp mode) the engine RPMs stay stable.

The valvebody ratio control piston also jams up, causing similar funky ratio control issues. If you are at this point the transmission is already gone.
Not sure what I’d be seeing if this were the case. Only the symptoms I described have been observed so far. How would this manifest itself? You mentioned that if this were the case, the transmission is gone; but would a valve body replacement correct things?

Another bad symptom is a delayed engagement from park to drive, like 2-3 seconds or more. If you don't have these symptoms..........the CVT isn't likely to be failing. If it whines, your fluid is either worn out, or the fluid level is incorrect.
We're not seeing any of this delayed engagement. It goes into drive normally. However, there is no whining so I'm a little uncertain on how to interpret the collective symptoms.

They do overheat something fierce when the clutch packs and belt are worn out but it has to be pretty far gone for that to happen. What you described is common and fixable in most cases with a correct CVT fluid fill. I highly highly recommend AMSOIL CVT fluid and a brand new sump oil filter replacement & the cartridge filter replacement, maybe even a new beehive cooler too and CVT thermostat
While I love the advice, my concerns are (1) is it compatible with 110K mile-old Nissan NS2? I wouldn't be able to drain the 3 quarts in the torque convertor without removing the tranny; so there would be a mixture of fluid types. (See FR’s advice on mixed viscosities etc. above.) Changing the filters and fluid would be a dream solution but I don't want to make the situation worse either.

How strongly do you feel about recommendation to change the beehive and thermostat?

Also, I'd download the CVTz50 phone app and get an OBDII bluetooth plug so you can see the CVT temps, torque converter slippage, CVT belt slippage etc. If you datalog a run I could review it and check to see what's going on.
You have a deal...do you have any recommendations on the OBDII plug? I looked on Amazon last night but it was a little confusing. It sounds like there has to be something called ELM327 compatibility but some of the better plugs on Amazon aren't real clear on whether or not they support that protocol.

Once again, many thanks guys!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Follow-on point on the "hunting" comment...I didnt see an edit option but wanted to clarify: We don't seem to experience this in limp mode either. The engine RPMs stay stable...any change in RPM during these episodes is strictly related to what we're doing with the accelerator pedal.
 

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Seems odd that Nissan did not know that the CVT transmission was a pile of junk from the get go. Manufacturers test their vehicles extensively before they put them out in the market place so surely they would have known what a pile of crap this technology is, then, to add insult and additional incompetence, once in the marketplace, they insisted in foisting this horrible contraption on the unsuspecting consumer, year after year.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
No argument here...what's also (maybe even more) surprising is that no safety recall was issued on this thing. Man, when that thing craps out on you on the interstate, its an accident (or worse) waiting to happen.
 

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Shop towel,

OK, really great info there.

The smooth lack of engagement and general "weak" power can possibly be attributed to the TCM basically "opening" the torque converter and not locking it up the converter clutch packs under power. So it generally "feels" like it's slipping, which technically it is but it's fluid slippage.........and that generates tremendous heat don't you know:). Now what is causing the TCM to want to do that, can be a few things. My transmission always does it at full power off the line, and also in high-g turns with throttle at maximum. The CVTz50 datalog would show this as an rpm "slippage" of like 128 which is basically an open torque converter condition, typically seen below 30 kph speeds under normal conditions.

No rpm hunting situation is great news, means the oil pump is at least not caused enough damage for the belt to slip at part throttle, thus the hunting that occurs when the pump pressure is throttled back for efficiency.

Valve-body or ratio control failure can cause many symptoms, but weirdness in upshifting, incorrect gear ratios, etc. occurs. If it feels generally normal here, then the valve-body is probably good. The CVTz50 datalog will confirm the actual vs. commanded gear ratios, so it's easy to confirm.

No delayed engagement from park to drive is also good. There is a built-in delay to avoid shock, but excessive is a bad sign of pressure leakage feeding the forward clutch packs. This can all be checked actually by dropping the valve-body with the transmission still in the car and doing an air-check test using an air compressor and gun to each control port feeding the torque converter, clutch packs, primary pulley, & secondary pulley. It's a little more involved than dropping the CVT oil pan, but an easy 1-2 hour job on ramps for a mechanic who knows exactly what they are doing.

The CVT belt can also be checked with the valve-body dropped using a boroscopic camera, along with the pulley face condition. If those fail the visual inspection and the air-check also fails, replace the CVT as it's 100% completely dead or on it's way out. The oil pump relief valve jamming is impossible to detect without a full transmission tear down, but the symptoms will show up in the pulley wear check.

Would I immediately just drop the CVT transmission? heck no. I'd have me a looksey and confirm it's truly dead before yanking it. IF I were swapping a new CVT in, I'd immediately first pull the converter case off and rebuild the brand new oil pump and install a Sonnax oil pump relief valve that is drop-in upgrade. This would pretty much make the CVT bulletproof on a stock engine, though the valvebody can wear out prematurely too. This is kinda where the AMSOIL oil comes into play.

The Beehive is impossible to clean really, the passages are like a honeycomb. I would find a brand new Ebay 2-port stock version for the Juke and swap it without thinking twice, the OEM ones are mega expensive. Thermostat can be checked with a thermometer and hot water, I'll look up the procedure and send it to you. I can't describe how poorly the Beehive actually transfers heat to the radiator, now imagine a clogged Beehive with 100,000 miles on it. I'd just do it while the oil is completely drained from dropping the pan. The cartridge filter sits inside the Beehive, also mandatory to replace if you suspect overheating. I fixed my overheating by swapping the filter, definitely helped.

AMSOIL fluid is compatible with CVT requiring NS-1, NS-2, and NS-3. You have a Gen1 running NS-2, I've confirmed there is no issue running this fluid. Changing the fluid requires about (3) full drains, then driving between each to get them fully circulated. This'll get about 80-85% of all the fluid swapped out, most hanging out inside the torque converter and valve-body. A good time to also drop the pan and cleanout the pan magnets or just replace them, they are probably fully loaded and useless at this point, though whatever was gonna wear out already did at that point....lol. I can't describe the AMSOIL CVT improvement, on a slipping transmission, think of it like a heavy duty clutch upgrade on a manual transmission. It's like a bear-trap in terms of clamping power, it maintains a freaking death grip on the push-belt and clutches, even if they are worn to nothing. I don't believe yours is truly slipping but probably the limp mode and open converter are making it seem so, the data-logs would tell alot.

On the OBDII plug, let me find the original box and I'll post up a picture of it. Seemed to work good once you pair everything up, I do unplug it when not in use as they are known to drain the car battery, but it has some internal circuit to prevent this. I can help you out more if you get it all hooked up and do some logs and send them over.
 

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Follow up on the viscosity topic.

There is no good reason to keep old CVT oil in the transmission. It's just plain wrong information. You can mix-in AMSOIL with Nissan NS-2 just fine, costs about $15 per quart but worth it. I was looking at some low micron filtration systems to scrub the oil on the bench so I could recycle the oil out since the stuff is so damned expensive. The idea was to swap fluids every 5k miles, recycle it on the bench using the low micron filtration system and put it back in the vehicle a few times before tossing it.

It was another thing I was looking at to extend the life of these transmissions. The pushbelt throws off so much metal debri it basically destroys the valve-body and oil pump. If you can scrub that crap out of there quick enough those components would tend to not seize up. The AMSOIL does amazingly well in the FZG wear test and if someone ran that stuff in a factory new car, I don't think the CVT would fail nowhere near as often. Heat and friction kills these things every time.
 

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And then Jaxxa does this with his CVT. LOL

 

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Hahaha......holy freaking crap. Love it.
 

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Yeah like wtf.

He needs a Drunkmann tune on that thing. It would be a hoot to see him roast some cars out there with those big tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Okay, in reply to pboglio's post - but first, THANKS again!

So, that all sounds kind of encouraging and I'm coming to the conclusion that the first step should be to drain/flush the fluid with Amsoil, replace the filters and the beehive and hook up the CVTv50 app. But, that's still to be determined; so,
here's another point-by-pointer:

This can all be checked actually by dropping the valve-body with the transmission still in the car and doing an air-check test using an air compressor and gun to each control port feeding the torque converter, clutch packs, primary pulley, & secondary pulley. It's a little more involved than dropping the CVT oil pan, but an easy 1-2 hour job on ramps for a mechanic who knows exactly what they are doing.
I’m not familiar with the procedure so, at least for now, I wouldn’t qualify as someone who knows what they are doing in this case. I have an air compressor and rubber tipped blower but would have no idea how much pressure to apply, where to put it or what to look for when I did. My thinking is to try the fluid/filter/OBD check first.

Having said that, perhaps dropping the valve body and running the boroscopic camera up into the belt/pulley area might save the expense of fluid and filter swaps if a visual inspection reveals significant damage.

I guess I’m a little uncertain as to which should be the first step. The beehive, fluid and filter change don’t seem to be difficult procedures so that seems like the way to go at the outset but I hate to drop a few hundred bucks only to later find it was a wasted effort. Any thoughts?

The CVT belt can also be checked with the valve-body dropped using a boroscopic camera, along with the pulley face condition.
Just so happens I have one of those cameras…but as noted above, I’m not sure if opening up the valve body is the right first step.

The Beehive is impossible to clean really, the passages are like a honeycomb. I would find a brand new Ebay 2-port stock version for the Juke and swap it without thinking twice
Beehive – sold, consider it done. Any thoughts on going with a four-port and installing a cooler while I’ve got the thing apart?

AMSOIL fluid is compatible with CVT requiring NS-1, NS-2, and NS-3. You have a Gen1 running NS-2, I've confirmed there is no issue running this fluid

Assuming the first step is an oil/filter/beehive change, I’m sold. Actually at $15/qt, its cheaper than the Nissan stuff.

On the OBDII plug, let me find the original box and I'll post up a picture of it. Seemed to work good once you pair everything up, I do unplug it when not in use as they are known to drain the car battery, but it has some internal circuit to prevent this. I can help you out more if you get it all hooked up and do some logs and send them over.

Found this on Amazon and it looks like a pretty good item.


However, I’ve sent the manufacturer a question asking whether or not it supports the ELM327 version 1.5 that the CVTz50 app specifies; waiting to hear. However, if you have one that’s worked for you, that might take the guesswork out of it.

Thanks again!
 

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Shop towel,


- Drain, refill, drive, then flush, refill, drive. Final would be to put in the new Beehive,cartridge filter and pan filter. The pan magnets are loaded to the hilt, dropping the pan and cleaning them will insure it doesn't make it's way back into the Beehive. I wouldn't flush with a new Beehive as you don't want anything getting in there from the get go. Fluid is expensive, but worth it. First change might be 10-12 qt. minimum, beyond that waste of time and money. AMSOIL sell a 1 gal (4 qt.) @ $58, so (3) for $124 total. The Beehive, just do it with the filter replacement regardless of 2-port or 4-port since the cartridge oil filter is inside of it anyway. Could do a 4-port, but you'd have to source a decent oil cooler, big hoses, and strap it to the radiator core or fender well and add even more oil capacity. Just don't buy those junk multi-pass trans coolers from Autozone or wherever, get one with a tube or welded header style like a car radiator (i.e. Setrab or Mocal) something in the 30,000 Btu/hr range or so. I buy my stuff (filters, etc.) from WIT transmission for the Nissan JF011E (RE0F10A) transmission which is a bit cheaper. The pan gasket I only buy from Nissan OEM at like $30, but WIT have alternate style that are much cheaper. Nissan switched to a large square angled-suction port pan filter which has better oil pickup than the older OE stock small round port style. So get the right one if you buy it as there are multiple types (i.e. round port, short angled square, long angled square, etc). I believe this helped with oil pump cavitation but honestly I couldn't tell the difference, I did everything together. All those little things do add up.

-The valvebody removal, NOT rebuilding it. If the above doesn't produce results then you can go to this step to dive deeper, it's not hard at all but has a couple tricks to get it back in correctly. This is the final step before I'd consider a new transmission or wasting money on a valve-body replacement, but it's actually not that hard, basically up on ramps like an oil filter change. I attached the Nissan TSB to show how it's done.

-A final simple check is to shift from Park to Drive while the engine is running. Not worried about the time delay so much but any abnormal hard "clunking" or slop. They clunk a little bit but if it's a massive jolt then this can be very bad. The purpose is to check that the forward clutch drum & input shaft are coupled tightly with minimal end play. A cracked forward clutch drum will allow the input shaft to slide in and out, engaging/disengaging the teflon gap rings that seal the clutches and pulley hydraulics, wearing out the torque converter input o-ring, etc. When they go, it takes out the entire transmission on the spot. Common failure on high mileage Altimas that are abused.

- I attached the AAMCO CVT repair manual (i.e. valvebody removal, air-check, etc.) along with the Nissan TSB that details the belt inspection. The pulley endcase replacement are not available for our Juke's like the Altima, but the valvebody is. If anything looks bad here, then a new CVT is the way to go.

- The price you got quoted for a brand new CVT install was outstanding. Lowest price I've seen on a brand new CVT is $2130, plus any shipping and tax. Typical CVT swap is in the $4500 from the dealership based on much research of the Maxima & Altima owner's. Most dealerships will attempt a reman unit, which is why you hear of repeat failures after installs. A new CVT is like buying it new from the factory with the same reliability.

- I'm running the : OBDLink MX Bluetooth. That's the brand from www.obdlink.com.

188508
188509


I'm including the: Nissan TSB, AMCO work instruction for CVT, and the OBDII bluetooth plug pics.
 

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I wonder if it isn't well worth the hassle to simply buy a Nissan gold warranty extension and not worry about all the hassles this bloody transmission poses? For someone who does not find it attractive to be constantly messing around with this horror show of a transmission trying to extend its short lifespan and which is still going to fail anyway, an extended warranty might be a more appropriate way to deal with Nissan's foisting this horror on us
 

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Sure, people buy those warranties. Here's a little secret, transmissions fail.......that's what they typically do. I did some research on NTSB and other customer complaint sites. I didn't find the number of failures on the Juke CVT I was expecting. The Altima and Maxima were pretty terrrible, but the Juke's were barely a blip on the radar with respect to their total sales volumes. The Gen2 pretty much non-existant for one to fail but I've heard of (1) actually going, most times people consider the limp mode a transmission failure......not the case. Most are RS AWD owners who like to abuse their cars. The EU Jukes did come with an oil cooler, the US should have got them but didn't. The US cars were confirmed to have come incorrectly filled with CVT fluid from the factory. Not exactly damning evidence of a major transmission design flaw but something that Nissan could have EASILY corrected. This is why the forums exist, to fix the crap the factory neglected. The CVT if it has a flaw is they really hate having the oil level under or overfilled, and they can actually stand some abuse but they have to have clean oil. Those are things owners can control and it goes a long way. Give me a bone stock new Gen1 Juke CVT and I'll get 120,000 miles out of it blindfolded without babying it with what I know today about CVT transmissions. You have conservative drivers who maintain their stuff, and abusive drivers who treat their vehicles like disposable garbage.

You wanna see a crap transmission, the Ford Fiesta dual clutch fiasco which affects nearly EVERY single transmission they sold.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
OK, I ordered the sensor from Amazon - BaFX hit me back with a nice response and its $50 cheaper. He says its ELM327 and he checked out the CVTv50 app's website and said he thinks it should work. If it doesn't, he'll take it back. What can I say? I'm cheap and $50 bucks buys a few cases of beer. :D

So the path forward will be as suggested.."wash, rinse, repeat" the fluid as is. Then:
  • drop the pan to clean off the magnets and replace the strainer,
  • replace the filter and beehive on the final re-fill; not during the flush procedure.
  • If that doesn't work, drop the valve body - give it a peek with the camera
Do I sound like I'm on track here/does this make sense to you?

I think I'm a little confused on the oil pan filter though...I would have just gone for the stock one but find myself wondering how to make sure I get the right one? Sounds like there are a lot of types.

On the shift to drive test...man, its about a half-second pause and it just gently slips into gear. Just like a new one. So, those indications seem to be okay.

I may have mis-stated the quote on that tranny replacement. That quote was for a used CVT with 65K miles on it and a 3-year warranty. Full R&R on that, with tax was $3K. However, my concern there is - how was it treated by previous owners...if the life-span is about 150K miles on these things, its already halfway through its life. The three year warranty does offer some comfort though.

Thanks again!
 

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Agreed, $50 in beer money who can argue:). Yep, procedure sounds good. Not any hard/fast rules but generally how I did it, the Beehive I realized I should have done but didn't.

- Oil level is critical, it has to be on the money when "hot". I slightly underfill it when cold, then bring temps up and slightly keep adding to the hot line. A Mityvac pump makes this easier, but not needed if you creep up on it. Nothing worse than having to drop the oil pan plug to pull fluid out.

-Important step: Check the thermostat in the rubber hose leading to the Beehive cooler (i.e. looks like an inline check-valve) to see if it opens in hot water on the stove top. Engine coolant runs thru this to the Beehive cooler to provide radiator cooling of the CVT oil.

-Just try that BaFX unit and see how it works, they are pretty much all the same. Good oil temp is something like 95-100*C, cruising on the expressway maybe 103-105*C is OK but you want to be lower if possible. Anything above 110*C means there is a problem unless you are doing top speed runs and at WOT for extended periods. I can't recall the limp mode temperature threshold, but if you are near 120*C just cruising at 80 mph it's because something is seriously wrong in the cooling circuit or the oil level is off.

-Be careful on the oil pan because some of those small screws might strip out the aluminum case, torque specs I can give you, but hand tight.

-Dealership will give you the latest revision update of the pan filter, just order it for the 2012 Juke CVT. I'll post a pic of what it should look like.

-Shift test sounds good. I kinda knew it from how you described but one less problem to worry about in the future.

- Figured I'd mention this but running cold temperature without properly warming up the CVT and beating on it will cavitate the oil pump. I give it a good 5-10 min warmup to get above 80*C. This is extremely bad for the belt as it most definitely will slip when cold and pushed hard. This is where the AMSOIL will help keep the fluid at the optimal viscosity at temperature extremes being a synthetic.

- Final check: Do you hear any "rattling" noise especially when turning left/right. This is the famous primary/secondary bearing rattle. When they lockup, they take out the transmission. This was a common problem on the older Altima which had a sealed bearing. The Juke run an open roller bearing design with pressurized oil injection for lubrication/cooling to help prevent bearing seizure. Being open and unshielded, they do get debri in them which makes them noisy. The debri get's past the cartridge filter and into the cooling/lubrication circuit, a good reason to swap the oil filter on every oil change and keep those magnets clean. The belt is also splash lubricated with an injection nozzle and having dirty oil make it's way past the filter just grinds the belt down where it doesn't even touch the pulley. I know can't do much on a 100,000 mile transmission, but cool and clean lubricant will radically increase the life of the CVT.

-Hard pass on any used CVT transmissions, totally not worth the risk with unknown owners.

I think that's pretty much it. Sounds like you got it covered though. Take a datalog before and after for comparison, and I'll take a look at it.
 

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At 110K miles OP is getting into the red zone for Gen1 CVT sure there are some preventative measures but the inevitable looks near. IMHO OP needs to make a decision is he ready to put down cash for a CVT? How much does a new CVT cost anyways? Does he want to go with a used CVT with unknown history?? Or get out of the Juke now while it still runs before it breaks down???
 
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