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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all, new member here. I searched the site for this issue but didn't really find a thread that was quite on point for what we experienced recently. We were making a roughly 350 mile trip on the interstate and we experienced pretty much a total loss of power on the freeway. Outdoor temperatures were probably in the mid-to-upper 80's; so its not like we were cruising through Death Valley. We went from 85 to 50 almost immediately and continued to slow almost to the point of getting rear ended. You could pin the accelerator pedal to the floor but all you would get is increased engine rpm and the car would continue to slow down. So we hopped off (well, limped off actually) at the nearest exit and waited for 20 minutes or so and proceeded in hopes that cooling it down would help; which it did for a while. Later we had to pull off again and wait it out a couple more times. The first interval was around 150 miles or so...second was around 80 miles. Similar threads seem to point to a TCM component that is designed to protect the transmission from overheating damage. So, I'm wondering if this was actually transmission "slippage" or the car flipping into "limp mode"; which would beg the question of why was it getting hot enough to go into protection mode? This leads me to wonder if I need to install a tranny oil cooler?

Other commentary suggests that a CVT fluid change may correct the problem...or at least what sounded like similar problems. Any chance this is related to a bit of over-due maintenance??

We purchased the car used so are not sure of its maintenance history. However, we do know that its bone stock with no tweaks to turbo boost, transmission performance, etc. Just a nice little stock Juke with about 110K miles on the clock.

As I mentioned, I did try to search for something that seemed to fit our situation but didn't come across a good match in previous threads. So, if I could ask for your input, it would be very much appreciated.

Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi and thanks for the fast reply! Do you think this could be the cause of the problem? One other question also just occurred to me...I saw a video by Fast Religion that said if your CVT fluid is beyond 50K miles old, not to change it at all due to creation of uneven viscosity between the old and new fluid. Any thoughts on that advice? Thanks again!

He says this at 6:45
 

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I would do (3) drain and fill cycles in a row. Drive about 20-50 miles of light driving in between. Statistically that changes over 90% of the fluid.

Matt knows his stuff and we all look to him for our Juke issues but I don't think accepting that you have to cool the vehicle down after an hour of driving.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah, he really seems to know his business. Any thoughts on that TCM module and why it would be triggering, installing a cooler and the likelihood of serious damage to the transmission? I guess in the back of my mind I'm worried that the tranny has been damaged due to untimely fluid change...my guess is that it has never been changed and the sweat on my palms that this concern causes is making a mess of this keyboard. 😉
 

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Do several drain and fills, but remember its $20 a quart so your talking $200 each time you do the exchange. Once the CVT start overheating, adding a cooler is a bandage and eventually it will have the issue again as the CVT deteriorates. The cooler should be used to extend CVT life, not to save it completely. As I have said over and over a CVT in a nissan will eventually die, all you can do is things to prolong its life like frequent flushes and a cooler. If the cooler does not prevent overheating it is time for a new CVT.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hey thanks for the answer and BTW - great YouTube videos.

Yeah, that stuff ain't cheap. I found it on Amazon for $89/five quarts. Still, three swaps at five quarts each, and I'm in for about $300 just to do the flush. (I'd do it myself.) So your point's well taken.

I guess all transmissions eventually fail. But, reading between the lines here, it sounds like you may be saying that since my CVT has started overheating, its already gone into a "death spiral" and its already pretty much trashed? I'm hoping not; but, if that's the case, there wouldn't be much point in spending the money on the flushes or installing a cooler at this point.

However, say that we do the fluid flush/change maintenance and perhaps add the cooler. Do you think we could reasonably expect to correct the slipping issue and get whatever normal remaining life remains for a typical CVT out of it? If that's the more likely scenario, I'm thinking it would be worth the maintenance costs and cooler investment. I know you can't put "hands on" our car but just hoping you can share a little perspective on the most likely scenario/condition.

Thanks again - I truly appreciate your insight and help!
 

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Once the CVT starts to overheat on the highway its just a matter of time before it overheats on back roads, then overheats once its moving. Overheats is really the wrong term, as its more of a increase in friction causing insufficient cooling of the fluid as the parts age that really happens. But yes, that is a sign of the death spiral. Adding a cooler and changing fluid can buy you more time which can help saving up for a new cvt or hunting for a low mileage used one (i DO NOT recommend this option). A good example of this was my friend angela: 110k ish miles and she started getting overheating on the highway after 1-2 hours of driving. Not a big deal to her as she only did that sort of driving once ever few months. Then it turned into every 30-45 minutes. At that point we added a cvt cooler. I estimated it would buy her 5-6 months before it got bad again This was in sept-october. Sure enough, spring time came around and the car started going into limp mode on her drive home from work. half hour. Then it did it after only a few minutes on the highway. She listened to me when we installed the cooler and began putting aside money every month for a CVT, so when we bought her a new one she wasn't stressed for paying for it and the install.

We replaced the CVT, flushed then re-installed the cooler on the new CVT, put a big ol turbski on it, and 30kish miles later the car runs fine.

CVTS do not like the constant heavy load of highway driving, and they do not like the torque of moderate to severe acceleration. CVTs live longest doing 30-50 mph cruising. My first juke got to 140kish miles on the oem cvt in the houston heat without issue (i did add a cooler at 100k miles for testing), before I traded it in, but i never really took it on highway drives. The one long highway drive i did do about a month before trading it in, in the middle of summer, it went into limp mode an hour in. It was not worth buying a new CVT at that point with the other work I needed to do to make the car last another 100k miles so I got rid of it.
 

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I believe what is happening when the CVT overheats is the pulley and belt surfaces start wearing grooves and other wear marks to the point where even with new clean CVT fluid the belt and pulley can no longer grip. I've seen a few pictures in other tear down videos and threads that show the discoloration caused by overheating and grooves developing on the pulley surface and the teeth on each element of the belt were starting to wear down. The fluid not only cools and lubricates some parts, but it's what adjusts the pulley ratios through a series of valves and solenoid, and also assists grip on the belt/pulley. In a push belt CVT, the fluid is really the workhorse.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ohhhh-boy. I was afraid you were going to say something like this. Actually, Angela's situation sounds very much like ours. Mostly, ours is driven back and forth to work...30 minutes each way...and its no problem at all; although much of that time is on the freeway. So far, we haven't experienced issues with local driving. However, it sounds like that's just a matter of time and I might be able to buy five or six months of time before the thing finally goes critical.

This sounds like a pretty common life cycle for these transmissions. I feel confident that you were very attentive to the 30K fluid changes but even then, you still had the same problem.So, maybe lack of prior changes didn't really contribute that much to the problem and its just one of those "it is what it is" situations.

Any thoughts on "best bets" for sourcing a new CVT? If you say Nissan dealer; I think I better look for a second job! :D
 

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Any thoughts on "best bets" for sourcing a new CVT? If you say Nissan dealer; I think I better look for a second job! :D
OEM or bust. There are no "aftermarket" refurbishing companies I would ever trust with such a sensitive component. My price for the CVT and fluids for it is like $2700-$2800. Install is a killer though. I can install one in about 4-5 hours without a lift, so my rate is cheap. $500 for a taken care of car that wont have rot or rusty bolts, $700 for one that has never really had any parts taken off it before. My nissan dealership charged $1400 in labor for a Juke AWD CVT install, which is 12ish hours of labor. Which if you do it how nissan wants you to, is about how long it will take.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I believe what is happening when the CVT overheats is the pulley and belt surfaces start wearing grooves and other wear marks to the point where even with new clean CVT fluid the belt and pulley can no longer grip. I've seen a few pictures in other tear down videos and threads that show the discoloration caused by overheating and grooves developing on the pulley surface and the teeth on each element of the belt were starting to wear down. The fluid not only cools and lubricates some parts, but it's what adjusts the pulley ratios through a series of valves and solenoid, and also assists grip on the belt/pulley. In a push belt CVT, the fluid is really the workhorse.
That makes sense...I can see that happening. Thanks!
 

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I believe what is happening when the CVT overheats is the pulley and belt surfaces start wearing grooves and other wear marks to the point where even with new clean CVT fluid the belt and pulley can no longer grip. I've seen a few pictures in other tear down videos and threads that show the discoloration caused by overheating and grooves developing on the pulley surface and the teeth on each element of the belt were starting to wear down. The fluid not only cools and lubricates some parts, but it's what adjusts the pulley ratios through a series of valves and solenoid, and also assists grip on the belt/pulley. In a push belt CVT, the fluid is really the workhorse.
Exactly what is happening. Once you overheat it, more than likely the damage is done. Like overheating brakes, once they cook once odds are they warp or gloss, and they dont work right, the more you use them after that the worse it gets.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
OEM or bust. There are no "aftermarket" refurbishing companies I would ever trust with such a sensitive component. My price for the CVT and fluids for it is like $2700-$2800. Install is a killer though. I can install one in about 4-5 hours without a lift, so my rate is cheap. $500 for a taken care of car that wont have rot or rusty bolts, $700 for one that has never really had any parts taken off it before. My nissan dealership charged $1400 in labor for a Juke AWD CVT install, which is 12ish hours of labor. Which if you do it how nissan wants you to, is about how long it will take.
Not like pulling a tranny off an old Mustang and swapping the clutch disk or throwout bearing 'eh? So, say I swap the trans and then faithfully change the fluid every 30K miles...it sounds like we'd still be looking at the same (or similar) problem in about 150K miles or so. I suspect that whatever maintenance didn't take place before contributed to this situation; but it sounds like even if you change the fluid you will still have the problem sooner or later.
 

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Not like pulling a tranny off an old Mustang and swapping the clutch disk or throwout bearing 'eh? So, say I swap the trans and then faithfully change the fluid every 30K miles...it sounds like we'd still be looking at the same (or similar) problem in about 150K miles or so. I suspect that whatever maintenance didn't take place before contributed to this situation; but it sounds like even if you change the fluid you will still have the problem sooner or later.
maintenance prolongs the life, a cooler prolongs the life. but it will not last forever.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
FR...just curious...can you say, generally, where you are located; maybe city/state? Just wondering if you're near enough to do the job if we decide to go that direction.
 

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i mean...i have had people travel furthur for less.. car i am building right now is from michigan, before that was new orleans. I had someone drive 6 hours one way for a downpipe install haha
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Ahhh heck...those of us in Ohio know that the guys in Michigan can't hardly pour a cup of coffee without getting their feet wet. LOL! Go Buckeyes!
 
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