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Timing Chain Related Problems - General Poll

  • 2011 - Original Timing Chain/Recall Performed (No problems yet)

    Votes: 69 27.8%
  • 2011 - Timing Chain Related Problem

    Votes: 40 16.1%
  • 2012 - Original Timing Chain/Recall Performed (No problems yet)

    Votes: 47 19.0%
  • 2012 - Timing Chain Related Problem

    Votes: 9 3.6%
  • 2013 - Original Timing Chain/Recall Performed(No problems yet)

    Votes: 60 24.2%
  • 2013 - Timing Chain Related Problem

    Votes: 4 1.6%
  • 2014 - Original Timing Chain/Recall Performed (No Problems)

    Votes: 8 3.2%
  • 2014 - Timing Chain Related Problems

    Votes: 1 0.4%
  • 2015 - Original Timing Chain (No Problems)

    Votes: 9 3.6%
  • 2015 - Timing Chain Related Problems

    Votes: 1 0.4%
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It’s a newer version, don’t know if there are recent revisions.
 
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*** IT WOULD BE NICE TO HEAR FROM ANY OTHER OWNERS OF JUKE 2013 (MODEL YEAR -MANUFACTURED IN THE LAST QUARTER OF 2013) and 2014 MODELS THAT HAVE ALSO EXPERIENCED TIMING CHAIN PROBLEMS AND HAVE HAD TO HAVE REPAIRS DONE AT THEIR OWN EXPENSE BECAUSE YOUR JUKE WAS NOT CALLED UP IN THE VOLUNTARY RECALL ** THANK YOU.
 

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I found my Service Campaign paperwork too. Completed May 15, 2014.

CAUSE: RECALL
P42131 AWD: Replace Timing Chain and Guides
1 A3028-1KC3A Chain-Timing Kit
1 13021-CK80A Sproket-Cranks
6 13042-3HD0A Seal-Oil, Camshaft
1 15066-ZW80A Seal O Ring
2 15066-6N204 Seal-O Ring
1 13510-6N200 Seal-Oil, Cranks
1 999MP-1217HP Threebond 1217H
5 999PK-005W30N Genuine Nissan

Obviously some of the part descriptions are cut off. Book time I think is 4 hours to complete, my tech did it in 3.4 hours.
 

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Thanks for that info. Your mechanic did it fast. Yet local Nissan dealership say it could take 12 to 14 hours to change the timing chain, tensioner guides. It seems like a long time to me. Quoted $1,625. just for the labor.
 

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Does anyone know what part number timing chain showed up to be faulty on all the MY2011-2013 Juke vehicles, as part of their SB-1005885-321 Voluntary Campagne Bulletin NTB14-030 involving 93,559 Jukes with defective timing chains? Also, when were the new improved chains made to be installed to replace the faulty chains? Was there a different part number that these new chains came out under? Did they have to be certified by the government? Seriously, I can't figure out how Nissan could not include the entire year of the 2013 year cars, and not include MY2014 cars that were built in the last quarter of 2013 under this recall? In my case, how could Nissan have known the chain was not faulty when installed in my Juke manufactured on November 26, 20213? Nissan Head Office Had no answer for me when I asked them to explain to me why my chain failed at 1086,800 km? Is Nissan hiding something from Juke owners that are facing early timing chain problems? Many are having the same problem as I am having. Or are they waiting for owner to put more miles on their cars, and then say that it is normal for older cars to have that problem.?
.
 

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Affected jukes are now 7-10 years old (give or take a few months).
2017 models are available at carfax starting at $11,000 and 2014's are $6,500 to $9000. (A nismo for $8,500!)
2017 models are available at carmax for under $10,500.

187989
 

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Affected jukes are now 7-10 years old (give or take a few months).
2017 models are available at carfax starting at $11,000 and 2014's are $6,500 to $9000. (A nismo for $8,500!)
2017 models are available at carmax for under $10,500.

View attachment 187989
Affected jukes are now 7-10 years old (give or take a few months).
2017 models are available at carfax starting at $11,000 and 2014's are $6,500 to $9000. (A nismo for $8,500!)
2017 models are available at carmax for under $10,500.

View attachment 187989
Why buy a Juke that has a reputation for having a faulty timing chain and then not have support by Nissan Dealer or Head Ofice for having their "faulty timing chain" repaired. "Once bitten, twice shy". Would you buy a Nissan when they forget about you after you walk out the door after buying a vehicle with a defective part that will self destruct just past the mileage warranty being 4,092 miles?
 

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Burden of proof to prove the part was defective lies with the claimant. Everything that has been provided thus far shows that Nissan made a good faith effort to identify the problem and repair it free of charge. Your vehicle in question has not been proven to be manufactered with faulty equipment. Logic and science doesn't follow the path of "make a statement" and everyone must prove it wrong. The way it works is that you make a hypothesis, followed by testing and observation to turn that hypothesis into a theory, followed again by more evidence to prove it is a law. At this point, it is shown to be repeatable with the same outcome under any circumstance. The burden of proof has been provided and now the challenge is to DISPROVE the law. You have a hypothesis. It barely borders on being a theory because you have a single data set. It is no where near being a law.

I understand you (or your retired friend) had a bad experience. You have the right to lose your brand loyalty because of your experience. But realize that you are simply grinding this issue (non-issue?) into the ground. On a forum for nissan juke enthusiasts. Most of whom are pleased with their experience.

This forum is a place to share ideas, knowledge, and help and create a community of nissan juke owners. If your contributions to this community are solely to bash the brand name and/or spread dissent in an effort to hurt nissan's customer base then I would suggest a better use of your time and forum use. Although I can't personally stop you from using the forums for these purposes, I can respond to try to help you understand how your contributions might appear as counterproductive and against the spirit of the community.

At this point you have shared your story, received a variety of contributions and help, and have engaged the topic for a lengthy duration. I don't think that you will be able to gain much more insight here and your time could be used in better endeavors. You have the opportunity to resolve your own issues with regards to this topic, but the options are unsatisfactory to you. Again, i suggest that you "let it go" and move forward with life rather than dwelling in the dissatisfaction of the past. If that path doesn't include nissan, then so be it.
 

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Burden of proof to prove the part was defective lies with the claimant. Everything that has been provided thus far shows that Nissan made a good faith effort to identify the problem and repair it free of charge. Your vehicle in question has not been proven to be manufactered with faulty equipment. Logic and science doesn't follow the path of "make a statement" and everyone must prove it wrong. The way it works is that you make a hypothesis, followed by testing and observation to turn that hypothesis into a theory, followed again by more evidence to prove it is a law. At this point, it is shown to be repeatable with the same outcome under any circumstance. The burden of proof has been provided and now the challenge is to DISPROVE the law. You have a hypothesis. It barely borders on being a theory because you have a single data set. It is no where near being a law.

I understand you (or your retired friend) had a bad experience. You have the right to lose your brand loyalty because of your experience. But realize that you are simply grinding this issue (non-issue?) into the ground. On a forum for nissan juke enthusiasts. Most of whom are pleased with their experience.

This forum is a place to share ideas, knowledge, and help and create a community of nissan juke owners. If your contributions to this community are solely to bash the brand name and/or spread dissent in an effort to hurt nissan's customer base then I would suggest a better use of your time and forum use. Although I can't personally stop you from using the forums for these purposes, I can respond to try to help you understand how your contributions might appear as counterproductive and against the spirit of the community.

At this point you have shared your story, received a variety of contributions and help, and have engaged the topic for a lengthy duration. I don't think that you will be able to gain much more insight here and your time could be used in better endeavors. You have the opportunity to resolve your own issues with regards to this topic, but the options are unsatisfactory to you. Again, i suggest that you "let it go" and move forward with life rather than dwelling in the dissatisfaction of the past. If that path doesn't include nissan, then so be it.
Others are also experiencing the same problems of early timing chain failure that I am except they are just having it fixed, paying for it themselves and moving on, without realizing that their chain may have also been defective, even if not under recall, as their serial number was not on the recall list! I am just gathering information thatlegal council is asking me to find out, such as the part number of the defective chain when it was first installed in the Juke, and that of the new improved, or possibly "certified" timing chain? Is that too much to ask? I was also asked to check with Nissan Head office, and I already have. I have gone as high up the corporate chain as I can, but they are saying nothing and not giving me any information whatsoever that I have asked for. A case is being put together. I am not turning this into a class-action suit, but I am taking legal action as an individual. Just trying to get answers for chain parts that someone may have out in "Juke Forum". As you know, you need facts to put together a good case. That's all I'm doing. I suppose you are familiar with the class action suit against Nissan involving 700,000 people for $5 Billion. My case will not even be close to that unless I win and other people may use it as a precedent case to support their claim.
 

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Burden of proof to prove the part was defective lies with the claimant. Everything that has been provided thus far shows that Nissan made a good faith effort to identify the problem and repair it free of charge. Your vehicle in question has not been proven to be manufactered with faulty equipment. Logic and science doesn't follow the path of "make a statement" and everyone must prove it wrong. The way it works is that you make a hypothesis, followed by testing and observation to turn that hypothesis into a theory, followed again by more evidence to prove it is a law. At this point, it is shown to be repeatable with the same outcome under any circumstance. The burden of proof has been provided and now the challenge is to DISPROVE the law. You have a hypothesis. It barely borders on being a theory because you have a single data set. It is no where near being a law.

I understand you (or your retired friend) had a bad experience. You have the right to lose your brand loyalty because of your experience. But realize that you are simply grinding this issue (non-issue?) into the ground. On a forum for nissan juke enthusiasts. Most of whom are pleased with their experience.

This forum is a place to share ideas, knowledge, and help and create a community of nissan juke owners. If your contributions to this community are solely to bash the brand name and/or spread dissent in an effort to hurt nissan's customer base then I would suggest a better use of your time and forum use. Although I can't personally stop you from using the forums for these purposes, I can respond to try to help you understand how your contributions might appear as counterproductive and against the spirit of the community.

At this point you have shared your story, received a variety of contributions and help, and have engaged the topic for a lengthy duration. I don't think that you will be able to gain much more insight here and your time could be used in better endeavors. You have the opportunity to resolve your own issues with regards to this topic, but the options are unsatisfactory to you. Again, i suggest that you "let it go" and move forward with life rather than dwelling in the dissatisfaction of the past. If that path doesn't include nissan, then so be it.
Extremely Well Said.

I wont be buying another Nissan myself but it doesnt mean I am gonna bash the Juke.
 
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We already provided the updated SKU for the revised chain, actually the first revision if I’m not mistaken. What chain you actually had prior on your 2013, good luck researching that. Even then, out of warranty means it’s an academic point. If you didn’t receive a recall letter, it didn’t qualify. That means Nissan to the best of their ability determined you didn’t have the defective chain installed based on the vehicle build date. Maybe it was built with the defective chain, and thus the burden is on you to prove that. You have the original timing chain on hand? This’ll be a short conversation if that’s the case because the design is radically different and so is the material. Without the chain, you have slim chance of proving your case without access to the Nissan inventory and build history.

Bargeld has stated the case beautifully, there is nothing more anyone can do to help you. And I might add over a $1600 parts bill, that would have been needed at 100k miles regardless. This is bordering on the insane to be honest.
 
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Extremely Well Said.

I wont be buying another Nissan myself but it doesnt mean I am gonna bash the Juke.
Don't get me wrong, the Juke is a great car and fun to drive. And there isn't a car out there that doesn't have its faults, big or small. What counts more is the company that knows how to stand for its product even if it is out of warranty for miles or years, for some cases, the company should still stand behind its product, on the universal law of "the customer is always right". Especially when it comes to a known fault in its timing chain that involves vehicles that were made in the same year of recall and they use the technicality that it's a "Model Year" and is a 2014 and not the year of the recall 2013 when it was actually produced? And do I really believe that they know that it isn't part of the recall because their s/n selection says so? And I know for a fact that other owners out there are also getting Ripped Off, only because I and other Juke owners are having the same problem on these faulty chains that really should last for the life of the vehicle! Do you think for one moment that I would pursue this if it was normal, or if it was the the fault of the owner? And what I went through with Nissan so-called Customer Service, Recall Service Department, and Management was downright disgraceful on their part. No wonder the company lost it's ISO9000 certification rating when their staff is so racking in customer service. I learned a long time ago in business, that it could take years to get a customer, but you could lose them in a second by the way you treat them. I guess Nissan failed to teach its staff that important rule.
 

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Of course nissan won't say it out loud, but when there are 330 million other customers/potential customers in the US and millions others worldwide, that old addage of "the customer is always right" flies out the window. Losing and gaining customers is a normal part of any business. No multi-million, international company is going to be able to please every single customer. And as I said before, I think you are searching for something(s) that can never be found. Answers, satisfaction, happy resolution. Even if you got the answers, made your lawsuit, and then won it, years later you would STILL tell people how horrible the process was and all the ridiculous steps you had to take to get to your end game. The end game for you here is obviously not to win the lawsuit, because you still would not be "happy". Your end game here is to have everyone else hear your story and hopefully fall in line behind you as a hater of nissan.

Again, at this point it appears that you just want to vent and share your negative experience and opinion about Nissan. This is nonconstructive. I learned a long time ago that repeating the same thing over and over does not make it become fact, nor will it sway others to share a belief.
 

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I'm going to play devil's advocate:

Nissan identify there is a problem with an SKU for their timing chain, it's been installed on all 2010-2012 vehicles, based on build date. The 2010-2012 model seem to be having a high incidence of timing chain issues, thus warranting evaluation by Nissan, and subsequent recall. Why not the 2013? Because the failure rates don't dictate it. That means the 2013 and up models must have already had an updated timing chain design, almost certainly. Whether the 2010-2012 "revised" timing chain IS the original 2013 timing chain is the question, I don't personally know. IF that's the case, what upgrades could the 2013 then get, if they already came with it. If NOT, Nissan deemed the frequency of failures on 2013 model year not sufficient to warrant a recall. THAT is the question. Follow, it still might NOT be as reliable as it should be, but it's enough to not meet full recall standards.

The burden is now on YOU for a good will coverage, which looks like you were turned down. It's a grey middle ground. I don't think anyone on the forums can help you solve it. Also, the timing chain is NOT the life of the vehicle, that kind of thinking will get you back to where you are at. They are good for 100k tops, don't care what the manual states.

You will keep on with ISO9000 but in fact it's because of ISO that the recall got rolled out. No companies are infallible. They did their best to address the issues. Seems the Gen2 are having a lot fewer problems.

Personal opinion here: Dealership should have good willed it or done at their cost. That's my opinion as the mileage of failure @ 65k miles seemed low. That is discretionary based on the dealership but they aren't obligated to.
 

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Just being nitpicky, but it was never a "recall". It was a "technical service bulletin". They weren't ever forced to do the service due to safety reasons. The bulletin was issued and repairs offered for the exact complaint that Josheph has... Nissan chose to proactively service the vehicle in order to maintain customer satisfaction and overall total repair costs to a minimum. Had they not chosen this route, they would have suffered from bad brand experience and probably much larger loss due to individual and class action lawsuits.

They assessed, ran the numbers, included the vehicles that they deemed "worthy" and executed a business plan. Every major company does this. People/products are left unincluded in these campaigns all the time, but they did their best to mitigate overall loss.
 

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Got it, thought it was a recall.

I honestly don't know what the 2013-2014 failures looked like but it probably wasn't high enough to warrant a TSB. In my field a TSB is a bit different. It's typically a heads-up to dealers of a pending issue. They can escalate it to an RMA or warranty claim I suppose if their customer was affected, or they can use a work around or good will service. A recall need not be safety based, but more liability based and it's rare IMHO for my field.

Joseph, it just seems to me WAY WAY out of proportion to the cost you/friend incurred. I have stated that the timing chain itself is a CONSUMABLE, it's NOT life of the vehicle. You can parse the service manual to give you that impression, but it isn't so.....not by a long shot. They are covered on the powertrain at 5 years/60k miles so it's clearly NOT a for-life product, in fact NONE of the car is. When you understand how a complex machine works, it's remarkable they can go 5 years with the abuse and neglect owners give them.

I don't know if it's YOU escalating it with your lawyer or the other way around, then looking for other 2013-2014 owners to justify your case. It almost appears to be an attempt at a class action..........and I don't see it happening......nope I don't. If you had lost an engine.........then maybe lawsuit time, even then you were out of warranty at that point. No, that didn't actually happen from what you stated unless I missed something. That is what really bothers me. I know it's $1600-$1700, it sucks and not everyone is rich but please get over it already. Like I said, dealer should just have done it for cost IMHO to keep a happy customer.

There are probabilities of failure, Weibull distribution curves and all that good stuff. I did quite a bit of research on Bosch CVT belt reliability and came away a bit surprised about failure modes, cycles to failure, etc. There are no guarantees at all. The product doesn't have much over design, those that fall under the expected life.........they get a warranty. That's how she works boys and girls. Cheaper to warranty those few then over design for everyone else. Yes, I do new product development. Yes, I do DFMEA during product development. Yes, I do failure mode analysis of existing production products. Yes, I have a predicted failure rate which is acceptable to my field....which is much higher than automotive actually. Yes, we do component/product running changes/revisions to increase reliability. I calculate cost added to a product to achieve a certain SAFETY margin and failure probability, which is difficult to ascertain on product launch. Yes, I do reliability testing. I design my DVP&R test plans, run them thru accelerated life cycle. Yes, I conduct field trials for those same products in the real-world. All that good stuff a Nissan engineer would do as well. It's not perfect, sometimes real world trumps lab testing. But I believe Nissan did the best they could with the corrective actions they implemented in terms of the timing chain TSB, that's my opinion. You got caught outside the warranty period, which sucks but isn't all that common either. Most will get 100k on their chains with frequent oil changes and normal driving.

You/friend now have the best timing chain components they can offer. I'm stating right now: have your friend run 100% Synthetic engine oil and change oil filters every 3-6k miles and this doesn't happen again for at least 100k miles. Don't tell me about timing chain tensioner shoe design and all that BS, you are NOT an automotive design engineer. I showed you mine with 80K of HARD brutal miles and it was no where near failing. I'm expecting the timing shoe to be ULTEM material which is pretty durable especially to high engine oil temps, but without a material analysis I have no idea. I checked the updated timing chain slack and it was within factory spec, ZERO wear on the chain pins and journals.....ZERO wear and ZERO stretch. I think that illustrates they might have effectively corrected the problem. I have no idea about the ORIGINAL timing chain.....and I don't care, cause it was covered under the TSB. The timing tensioner shoe had wear but again it was nowhere near failure, what would you expect from sliding friction surface anyway. Run the synthetic.....and come back when it fails, cause it won't. That service cost was competitive too, I doubt you can get quoted much lower anywhere else. You don't buy a $25,000 complex piece of equipment with ZERO investment in maintenance. It doesn't work that way, you gotta pay to keep equipment on the road. It will PAY OFF by not having to buy a new vehicle later, probably equal to (3-4) car new car payments before payoff, that is actually extremely reasonable.

What I'm talking about is a LONG term investment mindset. I seriously don't think you have a concept of how that works.....cost of ownership. Probably that timing chain service will allow the Juke to stay on the road another 100k miles with reasonable maintenance. Again, it's SAD you spent this much time lawyering up. You know it's almost like you took this personally with Nissan and are just not letting it go. Good luck and hope you figure it all out but I don't think anyone here can help you further, but if they do then thanks to them.
 
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Why buy a Juke that has a reputation for having a faulty timing chain and then not have support by Nissan Dealer or Head Ofice for having their "faulty timing chain" repaired. "Once bitten, twice shy". Would you buy a Nissan when they forget about you after you walk out the door after buying a vehicle with a defective part that will self destruct just past the mileage warranty being 4,092 miles?
My daughter bought a 2011 Juke from a dealer June of 2019 with 109,000 km. Timing chain broke and dealer said the engine was toast because it is an interference engine.Dealer quoted a new engine at $7000 with a 1 year warrantee. I put the car in my shop and tore the top end down to find there wasn't any bent valves. Removed all valves and measured. All in parts less than $1000. Car has 5000km since repair and seems to run ok.. Nissan dealer said there was never a timing chain issue but the chain was done at 45000 km and here we are again. Parts were expensive at the dealer so outsourced.
Zero help from Nissan on this one!
 

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Of course nissan won't say it out loud, but when there are 330 million other customers/potential customers in the US and millions others worldwide, that old addage of "the customer is always right" flies out the window. Losing and gaining customers is a normal part of any business. No multi-million, international company is going to be able to please every single customer. And as I said before, I think you are searching for something(s) that can never be found. Answers, satisfaction, happy resolution. Even if you got the answers, made your lawsuit, and then won it, years later you would STILL tell people how horrible the process was and all the ridiculous steps you had to take to get to your end game. The end game for you here is obviously not to win the lawsuit, because you still would not be "happy". Your end game here is to have everyone else hear your story and hopefully fall in line behind you as a hater of nissan.

Again, at this point it appears that you just want to vent and share your negative experience and opinion about Nissan. This is nonconstructive. I learned a long time ago that repeating the same thing over and over does not make it become fact, nor will it sway others to share a belief.
Not so. I only perceive a different attitude with Nissan management, as compared to other companies I have dealt with. Again, they lost there ISO certification and that says it all. My case is to bring out the fact that they are hiding the responsibility that they missed out including other year vehicles that have the same chain problem and they don't want to reopen the campaign again, hoping that owners with the same problems will look after fixing it themselves or it will just go away with the vehicles growing old and being taken off the road. You sound like you work for the Nissan organization to be so concerned with that company reputation? Again, a company is only as good as the way they take care of their customers. If you don't do it, they and others will not return as repeat customers.
 

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My daughter bought a 2011 Juke from a dealer June of 2019 with 109,000 km. Timing chain broke and dealer said the engine was toast because it is an interference engine.Dealer quoted a new engine at $7000 with a 1 year warrantee. I put the car in my shop and tore the top end down to find there wasn't any bent valves. Removed all valves and measured. All in parts less than $1000. Car has 5000km since repair and seems to run ok.. Nissan dealer said there was never a timing chain issue but the chain was done at 45000 km and here we are again. Parts were expensive at the dealer so outsourced.
Zero help from Nissan on this one!
And if you read the previous comment from pboglio, you will see that everything is hunky-dory with Nissan. If any timing chain break,s which is a rare occasion for a metal chain to do, then there was something wrong with the chain supplier that Nissan used when the chain was first installed at time of manufacturing? And if it breaks, the engine is toast! And you believed the dealer saying "there was never a timing chain issue" for 2011 Juke. So what is this Bulletin all about? https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/tsbs/2014/SB-10058825-3211.pdf And the dealer will charge you about $2,500. to put in a new chai, provided you haven toasted your engine by it breaking. Was your Juke ever put on the call list to have the original defective chain replaced? It should be in the dealer's history file under the VIN# of your Juke?
 

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Got it, thought it was a recall.

I honestly don't know what the 2013-2014 failures looked like but it probably wasn't high enough to warrant a TSB. In my field a TSB is a bit different. It's typically a heads-up to dealers of a pending issue. They can escalate it to an RMA or warranty claim I suppose if their customer was affected, or they can use a work around or good will service. A recall need not be safety based, but more liability based and it's rare IMHO for my field.

Joseph, it just seems to me WAY WAY out of proportion to the cost you/friend incurred. I have stated that the timing chain itself is a CONSUMABLE, it's NOT life of the vehicle. You can parse the service manual to give you that impression, but it isn't so.....not by a long shot. They are covered on the powertrain at 5 years/60k miles so it's clearly NOT a for-life product, in fact NONE of the car is. When you understand how a complex machine works, it's remarkable they can go 5 years with the abuse and neglect owners give them.

I don't know if it's YOU escalating it with your lawyer or the other way around, then looking for other 2013-2014 owners to justify your case. It almost appears to be an attempt at a class action..........and I don't see it happening......nope I don't. If you had lost an engine.........then maybe lawsuit time, even then you were out of warranty at that point. No, that didn't actually happen from what you stated unless I missed something. That is what really bothers me. I know it's $1600-$1700, it sucks and not everyone is rich but please get over it already. Like I said, dealer should just have done it for cost IMHO to keep a happy customer.

There are probabilities of failure, Weibull distribution curves and all that good stuff. I did quite a bit of research on Bosch CVT belt reliability and came away a bit surprised about failure modes, cycles to failure, etc. There are no guarantees at all. The product doesn't have much over design, those that fall under the expected life.........they get a warranty. That's how she works boys and girls. Cheaper to warranty those few then over design for everyone else. Yes, I do new product development. Yes, I do DFMEA during product development. Yes, I do failure mode analysis of existing production products. Yes, I have a predicted failure rate which is acceptable to my field....which is much higher than automotive actually. Yes, we do component/product running changes/revisions to increase reliability. I calculate cost added to a product to achieve a certain SAFETY margin and failure probability, which is difficult to ascertain on product launch. Yes, I do reliability testing. I design my DVP&R test plans, run them thru accelerated life cycle. Yes, I conduct field trials for those same products in the real-world. All that good stuff a Nissan engineer would do as well. It's not perfect, sometimes real world trumps lab testing. But I believe Nissan did the best they could with the corrective actions they implemented in terms of the timing chain TSB, that's my opinion. You got caught outside the warranty period, which sucks but isn't all that common either. Most will get 100k on their chains with frequent oil changes and normal driving.

You/friend now have the best timing chain components they can offer. I'm stating right now: have your friend run 100% Synthetic engine oil and change oil filters every 3-6k miles and this doesn't happen again for at least 100k miles. Don't tell me about timing chain tensioner shoe design and all that BS, you are NOT an automotive design engineer. I showed you mine with 80K of HARD brutal miles and it was no where near failing. I'm expecting the timing shoe to be ULTEM material which is pretty durable especially to high engine oil temps, but without a material analysis I have no idea. I checked the updated timing chain slack and it was within factory spec, ZERO wear on the chain pins and journals.....ZERO wear and ZERO stretch. I think that illustrates they might have effectively corrected the problem. I have no idea about the ORIGINAL timing chain.....and I don't care, cause it was covered under the TSB. The timing tensioner shoe had wear but again it was nowhere near failure, what would you expect from sliding friction surface anyway. Run the synthetic.....and come back when it fails, cause it won't. That service cost was competitive too, I doubt you can get quoted much lower anywhere else. You don't buy a $25,000 complex piece of equipment with ZERO investment in maintenance. It doesn't work that way, you gotta pay to keep equipment on the road. It will PAY OFF by not having to buy a new vehicle later, probably equal to (3-4) car new car payments before payoff, that is actually extremely reasonable.

What I'm talking about is a LONG term investment mindset. I seriously don't think you have a concept of how that works.....cost of ownership. Probably that timing chain service will allow the Juke to stay on the road another 100k miles with reasonable maintenance. Again, it's SAD you spent this much time lawyering up. You know it's almost like you took this personally with Nissan and are just not letting it go. Good luck and hope you figure it all out but I don't think anyone here can help you further, but if they do then thanks to them.
My friend always had the oil changed as required with the right 0-20W Mobil 1 synthetic grade. I'm looking at the Nissan dealer invoice showing milage at 1066,824 km, it's a 2014MY manufactured on November 26, 2013, and the cost to repair was $2,442.20. When we took it into the dealer, the engine was "rattling" as observed by the Service Manager. I said it sounded like the timing chain and he said they'd do an analysis because it has a sensor. Their electronic analysis diagnosed it as the timing chain being at fault, and if we didn't bring it in, it could have broken and destroyed the engine. Took them 11 days to repair it. FYI, I have taken mechanical courses in community colleges for engines pertaining to auto, marine, and aviation, so I do have knowledge of combustible engines. I do all my own work, even on my own airplane, under the observation of a certified A.M.E. Also, I notice that the guide tensioner has the two side "dog" clips that hold it in place to the rail guide were broken off, so I'm not sure if that happened when it was taken out by the mechanic or if it may have been the cause of the chain going off the rail and started the chain to slap around due to losing tension? As for the timing chain, it does not appear to be stretched as others have reported, and until I compare it to a new one, that cause of stretching will be unknown. Why they would use plastic on a rail guide in a hot oil environment, is beyond me. With time, the wrong plastic material gets brittle and can break with little tension.
 
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