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Hi, my partner and I are looking at a juke she thinks they are cute and it will be the first car she got to completely choose because she wanted it at 50. All the other cars she has gotten were out of necessity and what was available. Having said that the Juke we are looking at has 175,000 mi and is a 2012. anything I can find says they are a decent car. Keep in mind I don't mind a high milage car, my '06 Pontiac G6 GT convertible has 181,600 mi on it. I am well versed on older American cars and their longevity. I have never owned a foreign car, I know very little from experience about their longevity besides what you hear. we change our oil and do maintenance on the schedule that is laid out by dealer. this car is very tight and sounds good from an auto perspective. I have never owned a car with a turbo so a little nervous about that, it has a cvt trans again a little nervous. we are trading a 2013 Jeep Compass because she hates to drive it. just looking for thoughts on how many miles you can get out of the 1.6T CVT combo. I know my G6 can reliably go to 300,000 if cared for, looking for the same form this car. We generally buy higher milage cars knowing the will need some work but are reliable. thank you in advance for help.

~ Jamie Lynn
 

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I personally would avoid it unless it was a manual with front drive. Can your squeeze drive a manual? Its your money and its really up to you two but I'd be looking at something with less mileage.

2016 RS CVT.
 

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with regular maintenance some members here have gotten a lot out of their Juke. being a turbo just means you need to be diligent with the oil changes. Since it is a high mileage, we'd recommend a high quality synthetic oil for the rest of its life. being a CVT, make sure you maintain it with drain and fill fluid changes every ~40k miles. being a 2012 Juke, I'd make sure the timing chain service campaign was completed. Early Jukes were prone to the chain stretching, causing the tensioner to bottom out and break the plastic chain guides and possibly break the chain. Other than that there was a fuel pressure sensor service campaign to make sure it was tightened down to factory spec.

Personally, I wouldn't buy something that high mileage. If you're comfortable with standard maintenance items and brakes, suspension, wheels when needed then I say go for it.
 

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I would not touch it at any price.

CVT are rare to make it to that high of a mileage. That was a well cared for car. However, it’s typically $4500 to get a new CVT installed if something goes wrong, about equal to the price of that used Juke. They are great little cars, small, handle like a little sports car. The 1.6l turbo engine has good power and torque if not spectacular. You don’t mention if it’s AWD but that is also a bonus. Japanese quality is usually very good but Nissan tank near the bottom actually. The engines are great though, well engineered.

It’s a judgement call but you gotta accept the fact that the CVT will go out very shortly after you buy it. If you said 60k miles I’d say maybe but I’d have to see the service history as many have failed even at that mileage.

There are ways to tell if the CVT is going out but it would take an extremely skilled mechanic to look it over for a solid day to get in there and inspect it.

I don’t think it’s worth the headache.
 

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I would like to add a few things here if I may:

1. With the amount of miles that thing has if it's on the original CVT it would suggest that the car was highway driven a majority of its life as a commuter car. That means that there is significantly less wear on the drivetrain components.
2. What is the service history like? Was the trans fluid ever replaced?

I would stay away from this car. Nissan CVT's are pure and utter junk and will go bad even on unmodified cars being maintained. Like Gene said, not worth it because once the transmission goes out which it will 100% do soon you will easily be spending what you paid for the car at which point you should have just bought a used Toyota or something and just had zero headaches.
 

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If you can get the car cheap. Then put away $3000 for a new CVT. Then yeah.
 

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Lots of CVT bashing going on in here haha.

I would say that I would never purchase that high of a mileage of a car regardless of the brand, transmission, etc.

You don't know what the previous owner did maintenance wise is the key. If they changed the CVT fluid yearly and did plugs, coils, etc at 100k and shocks and springs by 150k then sure. But for all you know it's on OG everything and a mile away from catastrophic failure.

It may be being dictated by your financial situation so I understand it may not be an option but shop for cars under 75k miles. Super high mileage used cars are a serious gamble. If you're going to get a used Juke I'd also recommend going Nismo or Nismo RS and second gen (2015+). She would probably like that more as they are a good bit neater.

The RS is hard to find but there are a good number of regular Nismo's and those might appeal to her more as a used RS is likely to be modded and sound very racey, and also the Recaro seats are difficult to get in and out of. I'm a pretty agile person and I still get my ass assaulted everytime I get out of my RS. The regular Nismo has lovely seats that are easy to get in and out of.
 

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I don't have a lot to say about the Juke as I've had mine for less than a week, but as for the Jeep Compass you are trading in, unless it's a manual transmission it should be a CVT. I don't think the American market offered a non-CVT auto for that first generation. With that said, FCA (Jeep) CVTs and Nissan CVTs are probably different animals. Also, I'd be wary of any first generation Juke with that many miles, as the first gen had an older style CVT that was improved in the 2015+ models, which is why I got a 2016.

I can say that in the few days I've had mine I absolutely love it, and apart from my wife's Saab it's the most fun I've had in a car since my Honda ricer phase in the 90s.
 

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Nope, Jeep used a Jatco CVT. The Jeep Compass of that year had a JF011E (RE0F10A) for the CVT, very similar to the Juke CVT transmission which had the JF011E (RE0F10B). The differences are small and almost all components are interchangeable though possibly the AWD differential would not obviously. About 15% of my entire transmission is now from a Nissan Altima donor, they changed very little over the years. The Jeep Compass, Mitsubishi Lancer, Nissan Altima, and the Juke 1st Gen shared a near identical transmission. They all were notorious for CVT issues. Should go onto the Jeep Compass forums, ton's of CVT tech goin on over there as the problems are identical to what we have been going thru.

The 2nd Gen CVT is much improved, I've seen very little data on failures for the JF016E (RE0F10D).
 

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75% of the CVTs out there are Jatco. I love seeing people online talk about how Nissan CVTs are trash and then say the CVT in some other car is way better when they are virtually the exact same unit varying only in throttle body and programming.

Early first generation Nissan CVTs were bad and had issues. Second and now third generation iterations were perfectly fine with a fail rate in line with other automatics.

The transmission is the most likely fail part in most modern cars. When a non Nissan transmission fails its "ah, bad luck" but when a Nissan transmission fails it's "ah this piece of Nissan junk". Nissan gained a poor image in the mid to late 2000s and they have not done much to correct it. It's a public perception issue.

I saw a guy online once say he worked as a tech at Nissan and replaced lots of CVTs as though that meant they were bad. Of course if he worked at Ford he'd be swapping DCT and 10 speeds all day.

Whole thing is just silly. If you search the forums here, going back a decade, there aren't any more mentions of transmission failure than you'll find on an other car forum.

Is the CVT some hyper reliable long hauler you know will last 300k? Absolutely not. Is it a reliable unit in line with modern standards that with proper maintenance will last the life of the car? Yep.
 
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Nissan are pulling away from CVT somewhat. The Juke in Europe is a 7spd-DSG. The 2022 Pathfinder will be a 9-automatic.

The JF011E was a poor design. The newer JF016 was better, but still had some issues with the oil pump. It has a better valve body, eliminated the unreliable ratio control stepper, and a much better design CVT pushbelt that grips the pulleys better with much more contact surface area as well. I think the technology can work. The WRX CVT and the Lavorg are putting down some serious torque numbers, some guy had 360 whp on one. Seems the weakness on that car is the torque converter.

I think the chain drive is totally the way to go and Nissan went that way in the JF017 on the Maxima.

Any 1st Gen Juke CVT is going to have problems eventually, more so than a normal automatic.
 

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Jamielyn just wanted to add:-

I'm not sure about the Nismo RS recommendation from a parts availability point of view. There are roughly some 200-odd NISMO parts in the RS that make it a NISMO Juke. Mostly in the brakes and suspension. When I had the master cylinder recall on my RS I had to wait some >3 months for the dealer to get the replacement cylinder.

The RS is hard-to-find so your most likely not going to run into any.

2016 RS
 

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I purchased my used CVT RS with only 7k miles on it. (with all service records) If it wasn't for the low mileage I would not have gotten it. I love my RS but once in a while I'm afraid to even push it hard.
 

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Jamielyn just wanted to add:-

I'm not sure about the Nismo RS recommendation from a parts availability point of view. There are roughly some 200-odd NISMO parts in the RS that make it a NISMO Juke. Mostly in the brakes and suspension. When I had the master cylinder recall on my RS I had to wait some >3 months for the dealer to get the replacement cylinder.

The RS is hard-to-find so your most likely not going to run into any.

2016 RS
Me and my friend who also has an RS are collecting as many RS specific pieces as we can to put in storage so we have some leeway. One thing that sucks about having an RS is that depending on what breaks an OEM repair can be very time consuming or even impossible. The front A Arms are a good example. Made to order, cost a fortune, ship from Japan. An OEM repair on these for a fender bender isn't a 3-5 day process like most cars.
 
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