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came across this tidbit at MSN autos:

Aside from the expense, the biggest potential drawback to turbocharging is the process itself. That boost in pressure, as well as the cycling of exhaust air back into the engine, can lead to overheating, among other problems. The answer, traditionally, has been money, namely the price of fancier engines and frequent synthetic oil changes. But the cost of adding direct fuel injection to engines, which can offset climbing turbo-related temperatures, appears to be dropping. Gasoline direct-injection is sometimes called GDI or, in the case of the newly announced Nissan Juke's turbocharged 1.6-liter 4-cylinder DIG (direct-injection gasoline). Nissan hasn't announced the mileage on the sub-$20,000 crossover, but another advantage of direct injection is improved fuel efficiency, making it even more of a natural fit for the newer, more sensible influx of turbochargers.
Here's my stupid question for any car people: So does that mean that in a hot climate or under hot conditions, overheating might be a problem still?

Here's the link to the article about turbocharging: http://editorial.autos.msn.com/listarticle.aspx?cp-documentid=1137225
 

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came across this tidbit at MSN autos:



Here's my stupid question for any car people: So does that mean that in a hot climate or under hot conditions, overheating might be a problem still?

Here's the link to the article about turbocharging: http://editorial.autos.msn.com/listarticle.aspx?cp-documentid=1137225
Very rare will you find a factory installed turbo system making a car overheat. I have owned and still own turbocharged cars and very familiar with the mechanics. Without going into full detail as to how and why. The main reason for the air to heat up a lot is due to the turbo being placed very close to the engine. Thats why all factory installed turbo systems have an intercooler which cool the air coming from the turbo before it enters the intake manifold. This is how it is on most factory systems. Another way of preventing heatsoak is by mounting the turbo as far from the engine as possible aka the rear of the car. This is more expensive to do which is why you wont see it on factory systems.

Anymore questions about turbocharging or supercharging just post it up and I'll answer it to the best of my ability.
 

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Inline 4 Driver,
I used to own a Suzuki Cappuccino sports car with a turbo, some years ago.
It stated in the manual, that the driver should let the car idle (tick over) for 5 minutes at the end of a ride, before switching off. I think to allow oil to lube the system?
Would this apply to the Juke??
Thanks in advance for any info.
 

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Inline 4 Driver,
I used to own a Suzuki Cappuccino sports car with a turbo, some years ago.
It stated in the manual, that the driver should let the car idle (tick over) for 5 minutes at the end of a ride, before switching off. I think to allow oil to lube the system?
Would this apply to the Juke??
Thanks in advance for any info.

Older turboed cars had a poor cooling system (turbos get really hot) Modern turbos are oil cooled and the oil pump with run after you shut the car off cooling the turbo. In other words you can drive your car for 500 miles shut it off and walk away with no problems.

Also no need to worry about oveheating your car. The worst that can happen is the intercooler gets heatsoaked causing you to loose some power but nothing to worry about (for example you drive around down and stop in a parking lot when its 110 degrees... once you get moving it will cool of, nothing that will shut the car down)
 

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I have a turbo PT and I would reccomend using synthetic. The hot turbo fan is oil cooled in the PT and there were reports of regular oil breaking down or coking in the turbo oil lines. That could cause premature failure and is why they recommended running the engine for a while to cool it down if you were racing it. Seems like a good idea to use synthetic anyway with a turbo just to be as safe as possible. I've got 60,000 miles on my turbo and no problems at all with synthetic oil.
 

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I have a turbo PT and I would reccomend using synthetic. The hot turbo fan is oil cooled in the PT and there were reports of regular oil breaking down or coking in the turbo oil lines. That could cause premature failure and is why they recommended running the engine for a while to cool it down if you were racing it. Seems like a good idea to use synthetic anyway with a turbo just to be as safe as possible. I've got 60,000 miles on my turbo and no problems at all with synthetic oil.
There is no need to run the car for a few mins once you are done on modern turboed engines. The oil pump is electric and will run untill the turbo reaches the temp ECU wants it at whether the car is running or not. Broken down oil gets thinner not thicker causing it to not coat metal properly.
 

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There is no need to run the car for a few mins once you are done on modern turboed engines. The oil pump is electric and will run untill the turbo reaches the temp ECU wants it at whether the car is running or not. Broken down oil gets thinner not thicker causing it to not coat metal properly.

Wrong. Please do your homework before spreading misinformation.

Nissan MR engines, like most engines modern or otherwise, have mechanical oil pumps. I.e., when you shut the engine off, the oil pump stops. Modern BMW's and a few (not many) other stock turbo cars are equipped with electric oil pumps and turbo timers. Also, oil CAN burn and bake in the turbo.

That said, Juke drivers fear not. I would highly recommend using synthetic oil, but as long as you change the oil regularly, you shouldn't have anything to worry about with the turbo or engine in stock form.

Also, overheating shouldn't be an issue. Nissan has been making turbocharged cars for quite a while and they test drive their US bound cars in the southwest US in the summer, and work out all of the kinks before they go on sale.
 

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Wrong. Please do your homework before spreading misinformation.

Nissan MR engines, like most engines modern or otherwise, have mechanical oil pumps. I.e., when you shut the engine off, the oil pump stops. Modern BMW's and a few (not many) other stock turbo cars are equipped with electric oil pumps and turbo timers. Also, oil CAN burn and bake in the turbo.

That said, Juke drivers fear not. I would highly recommend using synthetic oil, but as long as you change the oil regularly, you shouldn't have anything to worry about with the turbo or engine in stock form.

Also, overheating shouldn't be an issue. Nissan has been making turbocharged cars for quite a while and they test drive their US bound cars in the southwest US in the summer, and work out all of the kinks before they go on sale.

You say i am spreading misinformation while you agree with me??? I can't find how the turbo is cooled but i bet its oil cooled. And just like the coolant, the oil will cycle through the turbo untill its cooled to whatever spec nissan decided. This isn't the 80's / early 90's.
 

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You say i am spreading misinformation while you agree with me??? I can't find how the turbo is cooled but i bet its oil cooled. And just like the coolant, the oil will cycle through the turbo untill its cooled to whatever spec nissan decided. This isn't the 80's / early 90's.

I didn't agree with anything you wrote.

Turbos ARE oil cooled, that was never mentioned by you or disputed by me. You said all modern turbocharged cars have electric oil pumps and turbo timers that run the pump after the car is turned of --WRONG-- very few stock turbocharged cars feature electric oil pumps and stock turbo timers; newer BMW's being one of them. MOST cars, old or new, Juke included, have mechanical oil pumps. When you turn off the engine, the pump stops.
 

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from my experience driving 2 different turbocharged cars, i havnt had them over heat. one was a 2002 SAAB 9-3 and the other was a 2005 Subaru Legacy. the environment was the Chicago summer heat + humidity, brutal combo. i have no doubt in mind that the juke will put up a good fight against over heating. i have some faith in Nissan, they make the GT-R (skyline) afterall:)
 

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Nissan did a TON of extensive testing in super hot and really cold climates on all their vehicles. Zero issues were found "when stock"

If your planning on flashing or buying a EBC (electronic boost controller) than your will run into overheating issues. Basically thats what your intercooler is for. Discharge hot air and suck in some cold air. Upgrading your intercooler does help but also good in fact increase your turbo lag (time the turbo takes to actually spool up).

If you find it over heating perhaps buy a performance rad cap (as dumb as that sounds) it will help keep temps down as it effects your psi in the rad.
 

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I have a turbo PT and I would reccomend using synthetic. The hot turbo fan is oil cooled in the PT and there were reports of regular oil breaking down or coking in the turbo oil lines. That could cause premature failure and is why they recommended running the engine for a while to cool it down if you were racing it. Seems like a good idea to use synthetic anyway with a turbo just to be as safe as possible. I've got 60,000 miles on my turbo and no problems at all with synthetic oil.


Im sorry to hear you have a PT cruiser
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
well, no, I'm not planning on "flashing or buying a EBC" since I don't even know what that is, lol.
 

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Im sorry to hear you have a PT cruiser
I'm not. It is a great little car and has a lot in common with the Juke . It has been the most fun car I have ever had. It has a turbo, all disk brakes and very good handling with a high driving position. It is an 05 and out of production now so I will have to replace it eventually.
In some ways it is better - I have plenty of storage - the rear seats are actually removable. The Jukes biggest weakness is the cramped rear area and the limited carrying ability. I even have a towing hitch setup. If you are saying the PT is ugly well that's like the pot and the kettle. People say the same thing about the Juke.
:cool:
 
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