Nissan Juke : Juke Forums banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,629 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a little concerned about keeping the non-metallic trim on the car looking good. There's a lot of it--the door handles, around the windows, around the wheel wells, on the front underside . . . thing. I don't know what this is made of: rubber? plastic? rubberized plastic?

I live in a very hot, harsh climate, and the trim around my present, 9 year old car has just disintegrated and flaked off. Looks crappy. Admittedly, I did not "do" anything to it -- maybe I should have been Armour-alling it this whole time; dunno.

Any tips for keeping this stuff intact and functional over the years?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
It seems it is made of a very hard rubber. I agree with you, I am not too crazy about it either since I live in a area that snow and salt are a common thing almost 6-7 months out a year....sucks.. The product I would try would be clear liquid wax or there is a product out there called BACK TO BLACK which I have used it on black trims of my previous cars and worked great, but the thing is you have to keep your eye on them and keep them clean most of the time, when they are dirty the car just doesnt look good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
447 Posts
There's no reason not to at least annually treat all vinyl, leather, glass, alloy, and fabrics in your car wither either Armorall or Meguiar's various protective products, maybe even twice a year if you live in a very hot and dry climate -- pre summer and post-summer.

If you keep everything in a cool, indoor protected place, all the wipes and polishes will last nearly the life of the car.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,629 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
alas, no cool cover available to me. I'll do better with my next vehicle.

can you treat glass?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
alas, no cool cover available to me. I'll do better with my next vehicle.

can you treat glass?
Yes. Rain-X for the outside and Fog-X for the inside. Aside from their obvious purpose they also help keep dirt of the glass. Even in the event that they do get dirty, it is very easy to clean them off.

For me here's what my schedule is for cleaning the car.

full detailing - once a year
wax and polish - once every 2 months
car wash - once a week/sometimes more if it rains or if its really dirty
tire shine and rim cleaner - same as car wash
leather cleaner - once every 2 weeks.
trim restorer - twice a year
metal polish - once a year(i use this for any metal finish like the muffler, etc..)

most of the products i use are meguiars except for a select few like for my rubber/plastic trim.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
447 Posts
alas, no cool cover available to me. I'll do better with my next vehicle.

can you treat glass?
I mean, the products themselves. Don't keep armor all in a hot garrage or it will evaporate! and Scratch-X will solidify :)

Glass will need treating after 24 months, you get buildup and small spots embedded in the top layer of the glass that automotive glass cleaner wont take off easily. For this i recommend 3M Orange Adhesive Remover. I've seen higher end detailers carefully use a razor blade to scrape off residue and then polish using some high end glass polish, but that's overkill imo. Then to protect, use Rain-X and Fog-X like I4 stated
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,629 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
oh! I get it now. and I forgot about the rainx stuff--I've never used it, but have heard about it. thanks; good info!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,629 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm bumping this thread up with a question. The worst problem with the non-metallic trim on my present car is the trim around the windows. Strangely, most of the other rubberized trim is okay. I want to do better with my next car (Juke!), so I'm posting a pic, and asking for your best tips on how to prevent it, and what products you think are going to be good for treating the Juke's trim.

My climate is frequently hot, windy, and dusty, and I do not have a garage.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
Unfortunately, there's not much that's very effective in desert environments, except a car cover. ArmorAll contains silicones which actually dry out plastics and it does does nothing to block UV. If you're going to spray anything on your car, 303 Protectant is a much better product.

I got used to ALWAYS covering my cars when I lived in Arizona. Now that I live in Northern California, I still do it even if the sunshine isn't as harsh here. People will counter that car covers scratch your paint and I say BS. Even if they do, it's a lot easier and cheaper to buff your clear coat than it is to replace EVERYTHING soft that gets destroyed by UV rays.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,629 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
hmm. Unfortunately, I can not see myself covering it in the parking lot at work where it sits all day. At home and on the weekend, fine, but . . . there's obsessive, and then there's obsessive!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,376 Posts
I'm bumping this thread up with a question. The worst problem with the non-metallic trim on my present car is the trim around the windows. Strangely, most of the other rubberized trim is okay. I want to do better with my next car (Juke!), so I'm posting a pic, and asking for your best tips on how to prevent it, and what products you think are going to be good for treating the Juke's trim.

My climate is frequently hot, windy, and dusty, and I do not have a garage.

That looks like a total Honda issue. You are right the extreme heat and exposure to direct sunlight will cause that to turn brittle and start cracking apart.
It took my wifes CR-V about 9 years for that to show up. It's ugly so I just scraped it all off to expose the chrome.
The next car you get with that kind of trim should be treated with some kind of protectant on a regular basis.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,629 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
yes, it's a 2001 Honda. I thought about scraping it off, too, but decided that would look crappier and probably wouldn't be effective. Depending on how I decide to dispose of my car, I might just have the trim replaced.

So, some trim treatment--without silicone?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,376 Posts
yes, it's a 2001 Honda. I thought about scraping it off, too, but decided that would look crappier and probably wouldn't be effective. Depending on how I decide to dispose of my car, I might just have the trim replaced.

So, some trim treatment--without silicone?
LOL, I've seen some Honda owners take the easy route and use electrical tape to mask the cracking. They have to replace it every so often.

I say products containing Silicone is ideal. Products containing Petroleum Distillates is a big "no no" when it comes to rubber. Over time it deteriorates it.

I've used protectants like:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
The worst problem with the non-metallic trim on my present car is the trim around the windows. Strangely, most of the other rubberized trim is okay. I want to do better with my next car (Juke!), so I'm posting a pic, and asking for your best tips on how to prevent it, and what products you think are going to be good for treating the Juke's trim.
I'm a polymer engineer in the automative/rubber industry. I'm telling you that so you can understand my background and where this information is coming from.

The damage you see to the trim is from severe oxidation. Rubber is about 50-80% made up of synthetic and natural polymers. These chains of atoms contain double bonds that are vulnerable to oxygen and ozone. Oxygen attacks the double bonds and breaks the polymer chain. This is exacerbated in the presence of high temperatures and UV radiation.

The trims properties degrade over time due to this aging. The compounds will become hard, inflexible, and more brittle. This will cause a crack. What you see in your trim is severe aging.

Polymer engineers (called compounders in the industry) use anti-ozonants, anti-oxidants, and wax to slow this aging process. Oxygen preferentially reacts with the anti-oxidants instead of the polymer. Incidentally, this reaction is why aging tires turn brown on the sidewall. The waxes act as a micro-layer barrier that protects the component when it is not flexing. This barrier breaks when the rubber flexes and more blooms to the surface.

You should already be able to see what you can do to increase the life of the trim. You can cover the car so it is exposed to direct sunlight as little as possible. You can make the car ugly by putting a wax over the trim. You can replace the trim. Your best bet is going to be to just replace the trim.

If you have another idea that works. Let me know and we can patent it and retire early.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
LOL, I've seen some Honda owners take the easy route and use electrical tape to mask the cracking. They have to replace it every so often.

I say products containing Silicone is ideal. Products containing Petroleum Distillates is a big "no no" when it comes to rubber. Over time it deteriorates it.
It depends entirely on what the oil product is. If it's a solvent like gasoline or mineral spirits that's a big no-no. It it's a wax or some other chemical it's probably OK.

The problem with these products is that once you've used them, you've often removed the protective surface off of the surface you were trying to protect. Now to protect the vinyl dash for instance, you have to keep using it. It's an excellent business model.

These products are essentially waxes and anti-oxidants often with a chemical to make them finish shiny. If you use it weekly/monthly you'll be OK. If you put it on every couple of months you're better off not using it at all.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,629 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Okay. I sort of feel better now, sounds like it's a very normal and expected result, and not due to my negligence.

what do you use on your own vehicles, Mr. Cycle4Fun?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,376 Posts
It depends entirely on what the oil product is. If it's a solvent like gasoline or mineral spirits that's a big no-no. It it's a wax or some other chemical it's probably OK.

The problem with these products is that once you've used them, you've often removed the protective surface off of the surface you were trying to protect. Now to protect the vinyl dash for instance, you have to keep using it. It's an excellent business model.

These products are essentially waxes and anti-oxidants often with a chemical to make them finish shiny. If you use it weekly/monthly you'll be OK. If you put it on every couple of months you're better off not using it at all.
Thank you for your sharing your professional knowledge.

What do you use for your vehicle when you want to detail it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Okay. I sort of feel better now, sounds like it's a very normal and expected result, and not due to my negligence.

what do you use on your own vehicles, Mr. Cycle4Fun?
I don't use anything. I live in "sunny" Akron, OH. I have to worry about salt, not sun. For that, a car wash once a month is adequate.

If I did happen to live where the sun shines I would look for a non-silicone based protectant. I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that 303 isn't silicone based, but armor-all is. Don't take my word for it. I'm sure there's more out there.

I also wouldn't start using it until 1-2 years into ownership. Before that let the designed chemicals in the trim do their job. Whereas I never need to apply more anti-oxidants because my trim ages much more slowly, someone in Arizona will see much faster aging.

Think of it like sunscreen for your rubber trim. Don't bother to put it on your tires. It will never stick unless the car is just sitting in the sun. In that case it should be covered anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
That might be just black paint on some of the window trim flaking off. Looks like it.
Not sure how to prevent it but you could have it repainted at a body shop.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top