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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey y'all! I'm new to the forum community as I recently bought a 2011 MT SV juke. I'm on the site because I'm worried about oil consumption. I went on a road trip of about 1400km a couple weeks ago and went through, no joke, 5 entire quarts of oil.


Going to replace the PCV valve this week and doing a compression test as well. The car doesn't leak and it also doesn't leave any blue smoke you'd get if it was being burnt. Obviously If the compression test looks worrying then I'll have some larger issues to deal with possibly piston rings and what not but I need some advice.


I'm aware that the turbo may be leaking oil into the exhaust because of a broken gasket or what not. It's what I'm expecting the problem to most likely be since the car has 150.000km on it. I'd like you're advice and experience if you guys have dealt with similar issues on the juke.

If I need to replace the turbo, I would also like to get a slightly beefier option. I've researched that the Subaru vf-28 is possibly a good alternative. Has anyone here ever installed that turbo? If so how hard was taking the OEM one out? Do I have to fabricate anything myself for the new install?


Hope to hear from anyone who's interested in helping me out! Cheers:)
 

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The subaru turbo does not bolt up. You have to build a kit to make it work…i mentioned in one video that i like that turbo on the juke and for some reason everyone thinks its a bolt on and go option. Its not. Its required custom flanges. Lots of welding. Lots of custom work to get it in.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The subaru turbo does not bolt up. You have to build a kit to make it work…i mentioned in one video that i like that turbo on the juke and for some reason everyone thinks its a bolt on and go option. Its not. Its required custom flanges. Lots of welding. Lots of custom work to get it in.
I just wasn't sure because I had also seen your video and I assumed it would need some modification but I didn't realize it needed a lot lol. You wouldn't happen to be able to show me a couple pictures of what you had to build eh? Because as a machinist, I have access to CNC machines and have my own stick welder. I might be able to figure something out without too much complication.


Also have you ever run into the juke burning a lot of oil tho? As I mentioned previously like almost 5 quarts within 1400km? Just want to pick your brain.
 

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You cannot stick weld these parts. Tig weld only. There are photos on my website of builds i have done with subaru turbos. Build photos and images here

Burning lots of oil can be from bad rings, bad turbo, or a valve-train issue. Rarely a pcv issue can do this. But. By rare i mean almost never. It needs to be properly diagnosed. Compression tests. Leak down tests. And removing parts to access the turbocharger to check for shaft play or seal leaks.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ran a compression test on the juke, all cylinders are fine. I know you mentioned in your earlier replies to attempt a leak down test, how would you do that? Do I have to remove the turbo to do this? Removing the turbo isn't an issue I just need to know what has to be done.
 

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Leak down test is done using a leak down tester, a compressor (with a high storage volume), and having a means of rotating the crank to get and hold cylinders at TDC. Nothing to do with the turbo.

What where the compression test numbers? Did you do it dry or wet? Hot or cold?

Removing the inlet of the turbo lets you check for shaft play or excessive oil leaks. unbolting the downpipe lets you check the same stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Leak down test is done using a leak down tester, a compressor (with a high storage volume), and having a means of rotating the crank to get and hold cylinders at TDC. Nothing to do with the turbo.

What where the compression test numbers? Did you do it dry or wet? Hot or cold?

Removing the inlet of the turbo lets you check for shaft play or excessive oil leaks. unbolting the downpipe lets you check the same stuff.
So I did the test cold if by cold you mean 30 mins after the car was run while I was taking stuff apart. I did the test dry. Without oil if that's what you mean. How would I check for play? Would I take exhaust inlet off or the intake inlet off?
 

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Dry means no fuel system on. If the injectors where still enabled then your test is not accurate, adding oil just confirms compression loss is related to rings after you do a dry test. Cold means a cold engine. Overnight cold. It should be done warm. So just checking.

What numbers did you get??

You check for play exactly how i just said. take the turbo inlet off. grab the shaft, see if it spins freely, see if it spins freely with slight sideward pressure.

Your not touching the exhaust inlet. You would remove the downpipe off the turbine outlet side of the turbo. But, you only do this to see if you can identify oil residue there.

Something tells me you are way in over your head. I highly recommend taking it to a repair center, pay the $100 or so and have it properly diagnosed. The amount of time your going to spend poking around and not getting a solid answer, can be saved by having it looked at.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Dry means no fuel system on. If the injectors where still enabled then your test is not accurate, adding oil just confirms compression loss is related to rings after you do a dry test. Cold means a cold engine. Overnight cold. It should be done warm. So just checking.

What numbers did you get??

You check for play exactly how i just said. take the turbo inlet off. grab the shaft, see if it spins freely, see if it spins freely with slight sideward pressure.

Your not touching the exhaust inlet. You would remove the downpipe off the turbine outlet side of the turbo. But, you only do this to see if you can identify oil residue there.

Something tells me you are way in over your head. I highly recommend taking it to a repair center, pay the $100 or so and have it properly diagnosed. The amount of time your going to spend poking around and not getting a solid answer, can be saved by having it looked at.
In that case I did the test warm as my car had been running 20 minutes prior to me getting the equipment installed and the spark plugs out. I had no idea I was supposed to disable the injectors. I was getting a reading of between 107psi and 112 across all 4 cylinders after doing the test 3 times on each cylinder.


I appreciate the concern of me not being able to figure this out on my own but that's why I'm on this forum. I don't mean to come off as rude to you at all since you obviously have much more experience with this stuff than I do but I just need to know where to look properly before addressing the issues.


I did not take my downpipe off as I had to put everything back together so I can use it tomorrow but that's a good tip I'll try that out soon enough. In your experience of taking care of jukes and addressing issues, what might be the main cause of failure for abnormal oil consumption? Like is it possible that it might be the oil return line that's clogged or possibly the bearing housing that's leaking into the exhaust?
 

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107?!?!?!?!?!?!! That should be closer to 160!!!! Do that test again. Dry. If its lower than 140 you have some engine issues. Pull the fuel inj fuses from the fuse box in front of the battery.

Your letting it crank over 4-8 strokes right? Those are really really low numbers.
 

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The reason to deactivate the fuel injectors is to limit oil being stripped from the bore walls during cranking which'll tend to cause wear/damage and diluting the oil in the sump with fuel which is also something you don't want to be doing. If you did (3) cranks per cylinder, this is why they are low. I'll typically do (8-10) cranks when hot though it puts more strain on the starting system. I've seen around 170 psi across the board with that method on my 2012. You have (1) cylinder down by 5 psi which is within spec limit of 14.5 though it's tough to tell with the 105, 112, 112, 112 readings. I'd actually suspect carbon deposits on the intake valve on that cylinder as these Juke's are infamous for carbon deposits. To confirm that if the oil is added to the compression test and the compression numbers don't all come up then it's not ring wear. A leakdown test would actually pin-point an intake/exhaust valve leak, piston leakage, major head gasket leak, etc.

Leakdown test I'd always do last anyway because it's even more difficult than a compression test for a DYI but not super hard. You have to know what your looking for, set the piston at TDC, and so forth. Easier for a mechanic to conduct it.

Blown turbo, possibly. Pull the intake charge pipe at the throttle body and feel if oil made it up to the throttle plate. There will be some in the intake tract up to the turbo compressor and even in the intercooler but rarely up to the throttle plate unless something serious has happened. If it's clean......not the compressor or turbo seal. Turbine oil leaks can and do happen but had that happened to any significant level you would be throwing a cat converter code burning that much raw hydrocarbon into the exhaust pipe and fouling the 02 sensors and cat. Make sense? Probably neither is happening. Intake/Exhaust valve guide seals........at high mileage you can be losing oil thru here.....yes. Mine were leaking oil enough to clog the intake ports @ 80,000 miles yet I was not burning oil noticeably between oil changes.

My opinion is simply take it to a mechanic but it's your call.


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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The reason to deactivate the fuel injectors is to limit oil being stripped from the bore walls during cranking which'll tend to cause wear/damage and diluting the oil in the sump with fuel which is also something you don't want to be doing. If you did (3) cranks per cylinder, this is why they are low. I'll typically do (8-10) cranks when hot though it puts more strain on the starting system. I've seen around 170 psi across the board with that method on my 2012. You have (1) cylinder down by 5 psi which is within spec limit of 14.5 though it's tough to tell with the 105, 112, 112, 112 readings. I'd actually suspect carbon deposits on the intake valve on that cylinder as these Juke's are infamous for carbon deposits. To confirm that if the oil is added to the compression test and the compression numbers don't all come up then it's not ring wear. A leakdown test would actually pin-point an intake/exhaust valve leak, piston leakage, major head gasket leak, etc.

Leakdown test I'd always do last anyway because it's even more difficult than a compression test for a DYI but not super hard. You have to know what your looking for, set the piston at TDC, and so forth. Easier for a mechanic to conduct it.

Blown turbo, possibly. Pull the intake charge pipe at the throttle body and feel if oil made it up to the throttle plate. There will be some in the intake tract up to the turbo compressor and even in the intercooler but rarely up to the throttle plate unless something serious has happened. If it's clean......not the compressor or turbo seal. Turbine oil leaks can and do happen but had that happened to any significant level you would be throwing a cat converter code burning that much raw hydrocarbon into the exhaust pipe and fouling the 02 sensors and cat. Make sense? Probably neither is happening. Intake/Exhaust valve guide seals........at high mileage you can be losing oil thru here.....yes. Mine were leaking oil enough to clog the intake ports @ 80,000 miles yet I was not burning oil noticeably between oil changes.

My opinion is simply take it to a mechanic but it's your call.


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So I did let it crank 8-10 times I simply meant I purged the line and did the test 3 times per cylinder just to get a good average. I Would assume that since they're all within a couple of psi that there would be a common denominator between all of them causing that pressure to be so low right?

I'm just looking for your personal opinion because as you mentioned the variation between cylinders is within allowed tolerance. I have not taken out the charge pipe yet but I do know that the inlet tube was clean and dry when I took it apart for cleaning if that's any useful information for diagnosis. I'll take the charge pipe out for a look anyways for sure.

Thanks a lot for your help this is really useful stuff man. I've messed with engines and cars before but I've never had to deal with such insane oil consumption before so it's just worrying me and throwing me for a loop. Thanks again pboglio!
 

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5 quarts of oil used. Really bad rings. To me that means a low compression engine.
 

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If you cranked it that many times and your compression is that low and your consuming oil, that tells me piston rings are bad for sure. Put a cap of engine oil down the spark plug tube and do the test again, if the compression skyrockets, then that confirms it. Once your compression is that low, weather or not it is the same across the board ceases to matter.

Its not turbo related. Take that out of your mind haha As soon as your said it compression was in the low 100's, then your pretty much there. 150,000km is a little on the low side for one of these engines to go bad, but its not unheard of.
 

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So I did let it crank 8-10 times I simply meant I purged the line and did the test 3 times per cylinder just to get a good average. I Would assume that since they're all within a couple of psi that there would be a common denominator between all of them causing that pressure to be so low right?

I'm just looking for your personal opinion because as you mentioned the variation between cylinders is within allowed tolerance. I have not taken out the charge pipe yet but I do know that the inlet tube was clean and dry when I took it apart for cleaning if that's any useful information for diagnosis. I'll take the charge pipe out for a look anyways for sure.

Thanks a lot for your help this is really useful stuff man. I've messed with engines and cars before but I've never had to deal with such insane oil consumption before so it's just worrying me and throwing me for a loop. Thanks again pboglio!
Yeah, stick with the compression testing. I do the test "hot". Run engine and quickly stop and immediately pull the plugs and deactivate the fuel injectors. You want to pull ALL of the spark plugs at once when testing. The throttle plate is supposed to be opened but I never do as the extra cranks compensate but YMMV. If the compression doesn't come up to 170-172 psi on (8-10) cranks then you fall back on the leakdown test which'll confirm the piston rings. At this point I'd add engine oil to the cylinder bore(s).....1 tablespoon or so and redo the compresson test if it wasn't mentioned already.

It does sound like a cylinder leakdown test might be needed if you still can't bring compression up to 170 psi minimum and go from there. Hard to believe a set of piston rings could be completely worn out at 94,000 miles on a stock vehicle. It can happen say if you are overfueling the vehicle at idle washing down the cylinder bores or running a really terrible airfilter. But my 2012 had excellent compression and piston bore & ring wear was almost nothing at 80,000 miles of hard driving. Where you running synthetic engine oil with regular oil changes?

These are tricky to diagnose. My GF Honda Pilot was loosing about 5 quarts every 3,000 miles. Straight away I figure piston rings are wasted since the engine has 350,000 miles. Zero leaks anywhere I could see under the car. I did everything I said here plus the PCV, valve cover gaskets, everything. Ended up being a loose oil control solenoid that lost a bolt. When driving it would blow oil right onto the exhaust and vaporize it so no obvious drips......though later it was blowing oil out the back. When engine was stopped there would be zero leaks absolutely nothing. Took me 4 hours with a boroscope to trace back the oil dripping off that solenoid. Every mechanic missed it.

Thus, these can be frustrating to trace back. My GF thought we needed to replace the engine. Nope, 350,000 miles and now the oil usage is down to maybe 1 qt per 3,000 miles and keeps improving.

Hopefully that gives you some hope.
 
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Something you might try to bring up the compression numbers after all of the recommendations:

Purchase some Sea Foam Spray and slowly inject into the intake manifold after the t-body while running the vehicle and follow the instructions closely. Doing this very slowly in bursts will prevent a cylinder hydro-lock but this is at your own risk, never had an issue myself. I like using Sea Foam Deep Creep for the cylinder bore soak by fogging it directly in the bore, do not run the vehicle when you do that. Let that sit overnight and then crank the engine with the sparkplugs removed and injectors deactivated. Throw a cloth towel over the spark plug hole to catch any debri from ejecting out of the cylinder(s) as you crank it or use a Mityvac to suction that back out. You don't want to leave liquid in the bores at all before putting the spark plugs back in. After all this your going to want to do an oil change to avoid diluting the oil with naptha if your going to drive it hard afterwards. The spark plugs will get fouled and the vehicle will probably throw a CEL mis-fire code but eventually it'll clear. Typically I remove the plugs and replace or clean/dry them out and reinstall.

The idea here is to loosen any carbon deposits on the intake/exhaust valves and piston rings. Stuck piston rings don't have good oil/compression control and it's worth a shot to see if it improves compression. The intake valves will almost certainly be heavily caked with oil/carbon at that mileage and this might bring up that one cylinder that's low.

Worth a shot before you bring it to a mechanic.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Something you might try to bring up the compression numbers after all of the recommendations:

Purchase some Sea Foam Spray and slowly inject into the intake manifold after the t-body while running the vehicle and follow the instructions closely. Doing this very slowly in bursts will prevent a cylinder hydro-lock but this is at your own risk, never had an issue myself. I like using Sea Foam Deep Creep for the cylinder bore soak by fogging it directly in the bore, do not run the vehicle when you do that. Let that sit overnight and then crank the engine with the sparkplugs removed and injectors deactivated. Throw a cloth towel over the spark plug hole to catch any debri from ejecting out of the cylinder(s) as you crank it or use a Mityvac to suction that back out. You don't want to leave liquid in the bores at all before putting the spark plugs back in. After all this your going to want to do an oil change to avoid diluting the oil with naptha if your going to drive it hard afterwards. The spark plugs will get fouled and the vehicle will probably throw a CEL mis-fire code but eventually it'll clear. Typically I remove the plugs and replace or clean/dry them out and reinstall.

The idea here is to loosen any carbon deposits on the intake/exhaust valves and piston rings. Stuck piston rings don't have good oil/compression control and it's worth a shot to see if it improves compression. The intake valves will almost certainly be heavily caked with oil/carbon at that mileage and this might bring up that one cylinder that's low.

Worth a shot before you bring it to a mechanic.

Dude I don't know how to say thank you enough. I haven't responded all week because I thought it would send me notifications. All that to say I wish I had seen this sooner it has been super helpful man. Everything you've said so far makes sense and is very much within my capabilities. The only slight confusion is over the 94'000 odo numbers.... I don't know where you saw that number and it just threw me off. Because my car actually has 200'000 on the odometer and literally had that exact ratio of oil loss as well.

Also I know I mentioned it has 150'000 at the very top of the posts but I wrote the wrong number it's 200'000 for sure. Lol my bad.

I just have one question for you, how do I deactivate the ful injectors on the juke? I'm assuming I need to get underneath the intake manifold which is on top of the fuel rails to get access to them?


But last time dude again this has been nothing but really helpful information!
 

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Glad to help. Yeah, I converted km to miles so 94k miles is 150k kilometers. Still 200,000 km is a lowish mileage for low compression but it's possible.

You can pull the BCM/fuel pump relay (#4) fuse in the passenger compartment fuse box. The fuel injector connectors are nearly impossible to access without removing the fuel rail brace/bracket especially on #1 cylinder and thus the BCM/fuel pump relay fuse is the best method. The service manual doesn't state it but you want a good battery/starting system to crank the engine fast so I'm assuming that is the case here otherwise I'd trickle charge it overnight before the compression test.


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Step 6 tells you to fully depress the accelerator pedal while starting the engine, this is clear flood mode and will automatically disable the injectors from the ECU. Engine will crank but with no fuel.
 

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Squirtbrnr,

Nice find, never realized that. I was always lazy and never did pull the fuel pump relay fuse and was wondering why I never smelled fuel and just rolled with it. On the EVO X I do have to pull the actual fuel pump relay but I do it out of habit from working on older vehicles and most definitely you can smell the fuel pouring into the cylinders if the pump isn't killed.

Anyhow, seems the OP is still getting 130-135 psi regardless so my understanding is a cylinder leak-down test might be needed at this point.
 
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