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Would you ever try this diesel fuel motor flush?

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Hello Everyone. New to Juke forums. Just purchased my stock 2011 DIG 1.6 TURBO 2 weeks ago. Bought it dirt cheap at my store where I work as a salesman. 1500$. My customer who I sold a New 2020 kicks to had traded in the vehicle so I had 1st dibs. Has 173,892 Miles in her. One 75 year old owner. She drove it quite a bit but car runs like new.

I have the ticking in the passenger side of motor which I think is the timing chain or its tensioner.

The first thing I did was change the oil myself. bought 2 different filters. A 4 dollar filter and a puralator one premium filter. I bought mobil 1 fully synthetic as the oil.

Also stopped by and bought 3 gallons of diesel fuel. Keep reading...

Step 1 drained all the oil and removed filter. Let the warm oil drain out completely. Attached 4 dollar filter and drain plug.

Step 2 proceeded to fill the crankcase with 4.5 quarts of diesel fuel only. :devilish: No oil.

Step 3 Ran engine. Idle for 15 seconds then 1500 rpms for another 15 seconds. Ticking noise on timing chain was a bit louder as I expected. No other valve noises or knocking at all.

Step 4 Drained diesel fuel from engine until the last drop. This stuff was completely black. Emptied 4 dollar filter and re attached filter and plug.

Step 5 repeated step 3. No issues. This time diesel drained out clean as when it was poured into engine.

Step 6 repeated step 4. This time I replaced with premium filter and 3.5 quarts of Mobil 1 fully synthetic Oil. Also added 1 quart of Lucas oil stabilizer for high mileage engines.

Runs like a dream. 馃槑Almost cant hear the ticking compare to before engine flush.

I want to push this car to the 300k mile mark. Any suggestions of other preventive fixes or inspection are greatly appreciated. Working as a sales associate at a dealer I know to never bring my car into service for any issue whatsoever. The techs are lazy and service advisors 馃挬only want to bill work never performed.
 

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DO NOT DO THIS. Modern engines are very complicated machines. There are an array of plastics, seal materials, etc. designed to work with a specific formulation of motor oil- diesel fuel is not good for them. Even if this did not destroy your engine this time, it is a VERY BAD IDEA. Maybe it works on lawn mowers, but not in a modern turbocharged car. In addition, if there is sludge buildup, the diesel fuel has a chance of breaking it off in chunks, which can clog narrow oil passages (e.g., the turbo) and destroy your engine. You want to use detergents that will break deposits down slowly over time. Nissan recommends against any kind of oil flush, much less diesel fuel.

If you are worried about deposits inside your engine, use a GF-5 or GF-6 certified "high mileage" oil and change it more frequently than recommended in the manual. For example Valvoline MaxLife Full Synthetic. These oils have higher detergent content but are tested not to damage your engine.
 
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That's amazing. Seems like you did the big stuff. I'd check on the timing chain service history, probably be the first thing I did and if I was in there the oil pump & water pump would get replaced too.
 

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2011 Juke - make sure the fuel pressure regulator has been torqued to factory spec. It was an early service campaign.

welcome to the forums.

your oil change probably cleaned out the oil feed line for the turbo and the turbo bearing itself. I would just make sure the turbo doesn鈥檛 have any play in the shaft now. I have no idea the differences between diesel and synthetic oil (I only know they鈥檙e both derivatives of crude oil through the refining process) I鈥檇 be concerned the turbo shaft bearing ran 鈥渄ry鈥 for any period of time. You鈥檒l probably also want to do an induction cleaning to clear the intake manifold and valves of any carbon build up, not to mention any diesel particulate and vapor that accumulated due to blow by or venting through the PCV. Diesel can contain trace amounts of zinc, sodium, and other metals that a gas engine and exhaust isn鈥檛 built to handle or clear out.

I would not be surprised if the engine develops an oil leak at the crankshaft pulley, valve cover, in a spark plug well, or at the PCV valve. While the diesel may not hurt the internal components, my guess is it will rapidly dry out a gasket, causing it to crack and disintegrate or at the very least leak due to shrinkage. Since diesel contains trace amounts of zinc, sodium, and other metals; anything like the oil pump, turbo bearing, crankshaft bearings or even like the valves, valve guides, and cams are now susceptible to increased wear from metal on metal contact or particulate scraping through.
 

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There are so many things wrong with this. Even back in the day, they would only drain one quart and then use one quart of flush chemical. But that was back when there was far less plastic in engines, engines were relatively simple and less optimized, oils did not contain as much detergents, tolerances tended to be greater... Filling it completely with diesel is asking for trouble. As some is likely still in the engine, I would drain out all the oil that is in there now to get more of the diesel out.

If the engine was totally clogged with sludge or seized up, then you could try something like this or filling the crankcase with MMO as a last resort alternative to scrapping it. But doing this to a running modern engine is a very bad idea.

@squirtbrnr One more note on the metallic anti-wear additives you mention. These additives like to stick to metal, essentially galvanizing it. However, they especially like to stick to precious metal catalysts used in gasoline cars, like the ones in your spark plugs, O2 sensor, catalytic converter, etc. This can cause false readings and mess up air fuel ratio, poison the catalytic converter, etc., and cause costly damage. The only thing that should go in the crankcase on these cars is motor oil in the correct specification and viscosity.
 

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I would have so many emotions going through me if I were too fill my crankcase with diesel fuel.


Not good ones, either.
 

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That is super scary....

An ounce of Seafoam per quart of oil and a week of driving would have been a much safer and less scary approach!!
 

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DO NOT DO THIS. Modern engines are very complicated machines. There are an array of plastics, seal materials, etc. designed to work with a specific formulation of motor oil- diesel fuel is not good for them. Even if this did not destroy your engine this time, it is a VERY BAD IDEA. Maybe it works on lawn mowers, but not in a modern turbocharged car. In addition, if there is sludge buildup, the diesel fuel has a chance of breaking it off in chunks, which can clog narrow oil passages (e.g., the turbo) and destroy your engine. You want to use detergents that will break deposits down slowly over time. Nissan recommends against any kind of oil flush, much less diesel fuel.

If you are worried about deposits inside your engine, use a GF-5 or GF-6 certified "high mileage" oil and change it more frequently than recommended in the manual. For example Valvoline MaxLife Full Synthetic. These oils have higher detergent content but are tested not to damage your engine.
I highly reccomend doing this. This car is running like adream now.
 

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2011 Juke - make sure the fuel pressure regulator has been torqued to factory spec. It was an early service campaign.

welcome to the forums.

your oil change probably cleaned out the oil feed line for the turbo and the turbo bearing itself. I would just make sure the turbo doesn鈥檛 have any play in the shaft now. I have no idea the differences between diesel and synthetic oil (I only know they鈥檙e both derivatives of crude oil through the refining process) I鈥檇 be concerned the turbo shaft bearing ran 鈥渄ry鈥 for any period of time. You鈥檒l probably also want to do an induction cleaning to clear the intake manifold and valves of any carbon build up, not to mention any diesel particulate and vapor that accumulated due to blow by or venting through the PCV. Diesel can contain trace amounts of zinc, sodium, and other metals that a gas engine and exhaust isn鈥檛 built to handle or clear out.

I would not be surprised if the engine develops an oil leak at the crankshaft pulley, valve cover, in a spark plug well, or at the PCV valve. While the diesel may not hurt the internal components, my guess is it will rapidly dry out a gasket, causing it to crack and disintegrate or at the very least leak due to shrinkage. Since diesel contains trace amounts of zinc, sodium, and other metals; anything like the oil pump, turbo bearing, crankshaft bearings or even like the valves, valve guides, and cams are now susceptible to increased wear from metal on metal contact or particulate scraping through.
Its running amazingly
 

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I highly reccomend doing this. This car is running like adream now.
I have done something similar on an old Ford tractor with my dad back in the day that was seized up to get it moving. I am familiar with the technique. This is not an old tractor motor. The engine is filled with plastics, sensitive sensors and coatings microns thick that you can severely damage doing this. You are putting your car massively at risk. There may be underlying damage that has not reared it's head yet. NOBODY SHOULD TRY THIS ON A RUNNING MODERN ENGINE.

You got lucky that you didn't destroy your engine. As my dad would say: don't confuse lucky with smart.
 

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I have done something similar on an old Ford tractor with my dad back in the day that was seized up to get it moving. I am familiar with the technique. This is not an old tractor motor. The engine is filled with plastics, sensitive sensors and coatings microns thick that you can severely damage doing this. You are putting your car massively at risk. There may be underlying damage that has not reared it's head yet. NOBODY SHOULD TRY THIS ON A RUNNING MODERN ENGINE.

You got lucky that you didn't destroy your engine. As my dad would say: don't confuse lucky with smart.
I wish it was a tractor motor. Might be easier to work on then. 馃ぃ Lmao but yeah. Gotta agree. Oil is oil. Diesel is fuel.
 
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I wish it was a tractor motor. Might be easier to work on then. 馃ぃ Lmao but yeah. Gotta agree. Oil is oil. Diesel is fuel.
An old carbureted, flat head cast iron tractor motor would be a lot easier to work on... but wouldn't be very fast, lol.

I feel kind of bad for the OP, as I am sure he means well. But I think most people have no idea how much testing and engineering goes into the formulation of modern motor oil or how dependent modern engines are on a range of lubricant performance attributes.

As you mention the difference between oil and fuel, one of the performance metrics that got a lot of attention in the development of ILSAC GF-6a and API SN Plus went to reduce volatility and prevent LSPI in GDI engines. In contrast, putting fuel intended to compression ignite (or any volatile petroleum distillate) into the crankcase is just waiting for the right combination of engine speed, heat and compression to go boom when it is not supposed to...
 
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I just couldn鈥檛 put myself in a position where I ran the turbo without oil. It鈥檚 already a nightmare to get off (it breaks almost every bolt off trying to get it off, happened when I switched pipes). For that matter running anything without oil. Just can鈥檛 do it. Trying to push mine past 200k without yanking it out for a rebuild.
 

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Not a counter but something to consider and why a quick additive like the BG products cleaner may do some good. These DGI motors can get 1%-3% fuel (or more) in the oil depending on if you idle it a lot or the type of driving is done. The Juke seems to be one of the DGI systems that can be susceptible to this. So where I dont say pour diesel into your oil fill. I can see a product doing some good to clean the engine and not do any short or long term harm.

If someone does a full blown OP type event. I would hope they would change the oil numerous times to Flush all that was cleaned and any residual diluted diesel.


An old carbureted, flat head cast iron tractor motor would be a lot easier to work on... but wouldn't be very fast, lol.

I feel kind of bad for the OP, as I am sure he means well. But I think most people have no idea how much testing and engineering goes into the formulation of modern motor oil or how dependent modern engines are on a range of lubricant performance attributes.

As you mention the difference between oil and fuel, one of the performance metrics that got a lot of attention in the development of ILSAC GF-6a and API SN Plus went to reduce volatility and prevent LSPI in GDI engines. In contrast, putting fuel intended to compression ignite (or any volatile petroleum distillate) into the crankcase is just waiting for the right combination of engine speed, heat and compression to go boom when it is not supposed to...
 

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Not a counter but something to consider and why a quick additive like the BG products cleaner may do some good. These DGI motors can get 1%-3% fuel (or more) in the oil depending on if you idle it a lot or the type of driving is done. The Juke seems to be one of the DGI systems that can be susceptible to this. So where I dont say pour diesel into your oil fill. I can see a product doing some good to clean the engine and not do any short or long term harm.

If someone does a full blown OP type event. I would hope they would change the oil numerous times to Flush all that was cleaned and any residual diluted diesel.
It's a good point. Some fuel does get past the rings, particularly in GDI engines, and there are actually additives in ILSAC GF-6 motor oil intended to deal with that relatively small amount gasoline to prevent problems. There are also additives associated with ethanol in the fuel getting past the rings and the associated water content. Those additives are not in most oil treatments, reducing protection (regardless of the marketing claims on the label). Fuel getting past the rings is also why the oil should be changed after an induction cleaning. But those are relatively small quantities. Generally speaking, you are recommended to just use spec motor oil. If you do add anything to the crankcase in a GDI engine for some reason, it should not be anything that can also be used in the gas tank or has a flammability warning on it.
 

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Yeah. Using say the BG engine cleaner would be a last ditch effort in my book to "solve" a problem or you are buying a beater and it had poor maintenance.
 
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