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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi! I have a 2013 Juke Nismo, Automatic. I have had it for about a year and. a half now and have never had a problem with it. I use synthetic oil every 3k-4k miles, and only use premium gas. A couple months ago my car started going into limp mode. No lights are on, the engine isn’t not, and there are no weird sounds. It would only happen on the highway about an hour into a drive. Stopping the engine and restarting used to fix the problem but I recently made a longer drive and I noticed my car was really struggling to accelerate. After doing more research, it sounded like I needed a CVT drain and refill. I took it to the dealership and they said everything looked fine (but they never test drove it so that doesn’t mean much), they replaced the CVT fluid and I was on my way. Well on my short drive home I just felt that my acceleration still isn’t as powerful as usual, it doesn’t have as much “get up and go”, there are still no lights, no hot engine, or any weird sounds that i have heard yet. I am assuming it could be a failing turbocharger but I just don’t know. Anyone know what the problem could be?
 

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I would double check the CVT fluid level. You can do this yourself, just warm up the car and drive it a few miles. Pull over and shutoff pull the CVT trans dipstick and it should be in the "hot" level between the hash marks. If not, then the fluid level needs to be adjusted by adding/removing. Almost always on a CVT this is going to affect performance.

The hour into the drive is a classic case of CVT overheat. The stop and reset is an easy trick but if the CVT is overheated this won't cure it for long.
They should have replaced the external filter in the CVT cooler housing. If this clogs then it will cause low oil flow thru the cooling circuit and cooling will still be affected.
Forgot to mention that.

Why the driveability isn't improved I don't know but you can start there. Anything else is going to require a vehicle OBDII scan.
 

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Shop manual says to check the CVT fluid while the engine is running fyi.

Let us know what you find out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I would double check the CVT fluid level. You can do this yourself, just warm up the car and drive it a few miles. Pull over and shutoff pull the CVT trans dipstick and it should be in the "hot" level between the hash marks. If not, then the fluid level needs to be adjusted by adding/removing. Almost always on a CVT this is going to affect performance.

The hour into the drive is a classic case of CVT overheat. The stop and reset is an easy trick but if the CVT is overheated this won't cure it for long.
They should have replaced the external filter in the CVT cooler housing. If this clogs then it will cause low oil flow thru the cooling circuit and cooling will still be affected.
Forgot to mention that.

Why the driveability isn't improved I don't know but you can start there. Anything else is going to require a vehicle OBDII scan.
I appreciate that so much, so you don’t think it could be a problem with the turbo? I feel like I’m still having sluggish acceleration, even just driving in the city.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Shop manual says to check the CVT fluid while the engine is running fyi.

Let us know what you find out.
I will definitely try to do that, but they make it really hard to get the transmission fluid cap off. I’ll give it a shot. thank you!
 

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You will almost never get a check engine light for a CVT limp mode issue, at least I never did.

You kind of have to lift the dipstick with a pick under the snap arm or small screwdriver because of the snap-on cap design. Like Mac said, leave the engine running to check it. Most important thing is the fluid has to be hot as the level rises with the extra heat and you want it bang on perfect when it's hot, not when it's cold.

I don't think it's the turbo. You could check this by monitoring the boost gauge if you have one and see if the ECM is pulling boost due to bad gas or something like this. Maybe check the intercooler hose clamps and tighten them down snug with a screwdriver. Limp mode is almost always the CVT though. Sometimes can happen with a bad tank of gas or water on the MAF sensor but much less common.

When you describe the 1 hour drive and it starts acting up, this is classic CVT issue. Mine was so bad the CVT would not let me manually shift anymore on a hot day about 1 hour into a highway drive. This is heat soak and fairly common on long highway drives. I fixed it by correcting the fluid level which was screwed up from the factory. An external CVT filter swap further reduced the CVT temps as a clogged filter severely restricts oil flow thru the cooling circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You will almost never get a check engine light for a CVT limp mode issue, at least I never did.

You kind of have to lift the dipstick with a pick under the snap arm or small screwdriver because of the snap-on cap design. Like Mac said, leave the engine running to check it. Most important thing is the fluid has to be hot as the level rises with the extra heat and you want it bang on perfect when it's hot, not when it's cold.

I don't think it's the turbo. You could check this by monitoring the boost gauge if you have one and see if the ECM is pulling boost due to bad gas or something like this. Maybe check the intercooler hose clamps and tighten them down snug with a screwdriver. Limp mode is almost always the CVT though. Sometimes can happen with a bad tank of gas or water on the MAF sensor but much less common.

When you describe the 1 hour drive and it starts acting up, this is classic CVT issue. Mine was so bad the CVT would not let me manually shift anymore on a hot day about 1 hour into a highway drive. This is heat soak and fairly common on long highway drives. I fixed it by correcting the fluid level which was screwed up from the factory. An external CVT filter swap further reduced the CVT temps as a clogged filter severely restricts oil flow thru the cooling circuit.
Wow, I really appreciate that information. I will have the filter looked at /changed. And I’ll take a look at the fluid levels when it’s hot. Thank you!
 

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This issue is why I joined this forum. Exactly the same issue with my son's 2014 Nismo. At 54,461 miles on the odometer (4/16/21), Nissan dealer diagnosed the issue and determined the CVT needed to be replaced. Since we were still under warranty, we were pleased. Got the car back on 4/29/21 but it didn't drive right. The RPMs were too high and at 57,017 miles, we brought the Juke back to the dealer (6/7/21). Sure enough, the (new) CVT needed to be replaced. Got the car back on 6/22/21. The car immediately felt better than before. Low(er) RPMs, great mileage on the highway (~40 gpm). It feels the way it should have felt all along. Background: I purchased the car with 24,763 miles and performed a CVT fluid change (OEM Nissan CVT fluid) at 30,005 miles. I am the second owner.
 

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I would advise advancing to a 30,000 mile drain & fill schedule vs the Nissan suggested every 60,000. It’s costly (specially if you aren’t doing it yourself and you’re using the Nissan branded fluid) but they really didn’t design the transmission cooling well at all. Along with myself, many have had good results with adding a trans cooler.
Heat is this CTV’s deadly enemy.
 

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Hi! I have a 2013 Juke Nismo, Automatic. I have had it for about a year and. a half now and have never had a problem with it. I use synthetic oil every 3k-4k miles, and only use premium gas. A couple months ago my car started going into limp mode. No lights are on, the engine isn’t not, and there are no weird sounds. It would only happen on the highway about an hour into a drive. Stopping the engine and restarting used to fix the problem but I recently made a longer drive and I noticed my car was really struggling to accelerate. After doing more research, it sounded like I needed a CVT drain and refill. I took it to the dealership and they said everything looked fine (but they never test drove it so that doesn’t mean much), they replaced the CVT fluid and I was on my way. Well on my short drive home I just felt that my acceleration still isn’t as powerful as usual, it doesn’t have as much “get up and go”, there are still no lights, no hot engine, or any weird sounds that i have heard yet. I am assuming it could be a failing turbocharger but I just don’t know. Anyone know what the problem could be?
John here from New Zealand. I had a similar problem with my 2017 Turbo FWD recently and after a lot of test driving by the local NissanDealer they found that the Alternator was faulty so could be worth a look. It was the Boost Pressure Sensor that had failed. The car completely lost all power but when it cooled down it was okay for a while but then it would loose power again. Cheers.
 
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