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I have a 2013 Nissan Juke S FWD with 138k. I usually change the oil every 3500-4500 miles and noticed it’s consuming quite a bit of oil. Previously I’ve had to replace the Turbo due to the bearing going out from the supply line being clogged. New turbo and better oil supply line (braided end to end) added about 15k ago. I’m noticing it is burning/consuming about 2 qts every 1500miles. No leaks and no smoke out the exhaust. Any ideas? Thanks.
 

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Possible the rings are worn, valve guide seals are worn, PCV isn't working properly, turbo is pushing oil thru the gap rings, etc. It's either leaking or you are burning it, no other options.

Pulling the upper intercooler pipe and looking at the throttlebody will tell you if it's making it into the engine thru the turbo. Compression test will tell you how bad the ring seal is. You might want to switch to high mileage synthetic oil if the compression results don't show good. The mileage doesn't sound like it warrants high oil consumption but you don't state what oil you've used. That 2 qts/1500 miles is extremely high.
 

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I use pennzoil platinum full synthetic 5w-30 API SN Approved. Wouldn’t I have white smoke out the tail pipe for piston rings or valve stem seals?
 

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Depends on how bad the leakage is. A compression test will answer the ring condition pretty fast without speculating. The intake/exhaust valve guide seals there is a trick to check it using a boost/vacuum gauge and idle stability or something like that. If it's not leaking, you are burning it. The PCV system can draw in oil during engine vacuum too, same as the guide seals. Have you ever replaced components in the PCV system or checked its function?
 

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PCV is the cheapest easiest thing to check, replace, and start with.
 

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I second Macgyver's PCV statement. Made a HUGE difference in my Z. Now I change them regularly. Not that expensive.
 

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I have a 2013 Nissan Juke S FWD with 138k. I usually change the oil every 3500-4500 miles and noticed it’s consuming quite a bit of oil. Previously I’ve had to replace the Turbo due to the bearing going out from the supply line being clogged. New turbo and better oil supply line (braided end to end) added about 15k ago. I’m noticing it is burning/consuming about 2 qts every 1500miles. No leaks and no smoke out the exhaust. Any ideas? Thanks.

First I want to say I am sorry that your having car issues, second I won't sugar coat it but I hate to tell you this but if your consuming large amounts of oil in that time frame you most likely have 1. a bad piston ring w/ bad piston that is getting ready to meet it maker or 2. The oil return line that feeds the turbo cartridge that connects to the cylinder head by the downpipes. Its a small bolt that has a copper sandwich washer on it. If that bolt is loose, partly loose or the washer is worn out it will leak oil out.

I would stop the car immediately or if its your only wheels to get around at least monitor the oil capacity chronically thru out the day. That way you don't ru the car dry. When your free on time to spare go to a general automotive store like ( Advance Auto parts, Orellys, Napa, Harbor Freight, or Autozone ) get you a compression hose kit tester with the fittings like a Innova Compression Tester. They are supper affordable and easy to utilize. Each piston with out the spark plug and with the compression tester inserted into the spark plug shaft / hole should read 122-130 PSI or better to run efficiently with out any large oil consumptions. If you need assistance shot me a reply and I will be more than gladly assist you. Good luck man
 

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First I want to say I am sorry that your having car issues, second I won't sugar coat it but I hate to tell you this but if your consuming large amounts of oil in that time frame you most likely have 1. a bad piston ring w/ bad piston that is getting ready to meet it maker or 2. The oil return line that feeds the turbo cartridge that connects to the cylinder head by the downpipes. Its a small bolt that has a copper sandwich washer on it. If that bolt is loose, partly loose or the washer is worn out it will leak oil out.

I would stop the car immediately or if its your only wheels to get around at least monitor the oil capacity chronically thru out the day. That way you don't ru the car dry. When your free on time to spare go to a general automotive store like ( Advance Auto parts, Orellys, Napa, Harbor Freight, or Autozone ) get you a compression hose kit tester with the fittings like a Innova Compression Tester. They are supper affordable and easy to utilize. Each piston with out the spark plug and with the compression tester inserted into the spark plug shaft / hole should read 122-130 PSI or better to run efficiently with out any large oil consumptions. If you need assistance shot me a reply and I will be more than gladly assist you.Also check by the turbo hot side if the valve cover gasket is cracked. You won't notice that its leaking because the juke has this weird metal horizontal plate in the back that traps grimme and oil.


Get a catch can also running from the PCV valve rerouted to the other end of the valve cover. Eliminate the return to the cold side intake system and the intake manifold because you will basically be reintroducing grime sludge back into the valve train and the turbo cartridge. A bad PVC valve won't cause that much oil loss, thats unheard off in newer model imports.

Good luck man
 

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I plan on running a compression test to check for worn piston rings. Is 122-130 the psi spec for the engine? As I do the test I plan on replacing plug checking the oil supply line washers and replacing pcv valve. If it comes down to pistons ill most likely do a full rebuild because with the mileage it’s at I feel that would be good for the engine. Will keep this updated for results.
 

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Well to be honest unless the person who assembled the engine with a micron meter tool the initial psi of the rings will differentiate. Any number from 120-125 and up is good to be consider oem speck with out having any piston knocking on the block when the engine is idling. I did a compression test on my second daily juke and each cylinder was fixed at 125.3 which is damm good considering 158,000 miles on the engine with inconsistent oil changes. It has a turbo cartridge upgrade ( oem oil feed line occluded ).

GET a pen /pencil + pad of paper , snap a picture also for future reference ( it helps to keep record of it incase you need it as reference later)

Incase you do have a bad ring and bad compression do this man, open all the spark plug holes up, (removing the spark plugs out, (get a syringe) pour 10ML of oil into EACH of the combustion chamber holes, let it sit for a few hrs (5-6hrs or over night), cover the upper section of the hood to avoid the future oil mess ( the black sponge insulator on the hood), cover the other sections of the engine compartment with towels. After a few hrs passes the injected 10mL oil will have crept into the rings if you truly have a bad ring. Next crank the engine with no plugs, crank it like 3-4 times, clean all the expelled oil that shot out from the spark plug holes, re test the compression on each cylinder independently. If the psi on any of the cylinders increased after doing the oil leak test then that is your weak or soon to fail piston ring. A true ring will not allow any penetration period, unless is water but then thats an another issue.

Also when you replace the washer on the oil line make sure you align the bolt correctly, again make sure you mark it or align it ( The bolt has a big R engraved on it with 2 holes laterally. Either mark it with a sharpie marker, or wedge a mirror or use your phone camera in reverse to help you align the bolt. If the bolt is not set right you will have drips and many drips of oil leaks from the oil feed line. I am using a AN8 oil line with fittings because the oem line is to small and occludes very easily from oil build up. If you use your oem stainless line make sure you clean it or let it sit in gasoline to knock out all the internal oil build up.

In regards to the PCV, Honestly I would get a catch can with a 2' breather filter and two lines. One from the PCV hole and the other from the right side plastic tube that sticks out and points towards the battery and the coolant neck filler. Since you are using non oem turbo a plain catch can will help, vent it to atmosphere with a 2'breather filter. That way you keep the valve-train, plastic intake plenum, intercooler + pipes, turbo cool side, and sensors clean and free of oil grime. But if you wish to your good with a replacement pcv valve. Hope that helps man
 

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I also have oil consumption problems, looking for a engine rebuilder at this time to replace timing chain. As the one on the I don't trust. Any help ?
 

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I plan on running a compression test to check for worn piston rings. Is 122-130 the psi spec for the engine? As I do the test I plan on replacing plug checking the oil supply line washers and replacing pcv valve. If it comes down to pistons ill most likely do a full rebuild because with the mileage it’s at I feel that would be good for the engine. Will keep this updated for results.
KISS.

Easiest thing is the PVC. It takes just minutes. Yes a PVC can dump a lot of oil into the combustion process.

Second thing that is easy is to check for Turbo Seal oil blow by. You can take off the Hot pipe off the turbo. 10mm wrench.

If your rings are that worn. You will have a lot less power and will be seeing blue smoke out the back.
 

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I also have oil consumption problems, looking for a engine rebuilder at this time to replace timing chain. As the one on the I don't trust. Any help ?
Like i stated in the earlier post regarding oil consumption. Check the compression on the pistons, also inspect the valve cover gasket, and specially the bolt that inserts into the oil feeding line to the back left side of the cylinder head.

In regards to the timing chains I never seen a bad Nissan chain go bad. In reference the Juke timing chains sorta look similar to a HONDA TODA timing chains / they are cosmetically assemble the same way.

If you have noise coming from the engine compartment its probably worn out plastic guides that ware over time ( 2 plastic guides that help align the timing chains).

Honestly I reuse both of my chains on my recent built , chemically and electro cleaned both chains and re installed. They are running strong as oem speck with new plastic guides. Not many people rebuilt ( Juke engines ) at good reputable machine shops. It sorta a small engine and time consuming. If your willing to ship it to Houston TX I can result it at Nissan for you. Everything will be Nissan from scratch. Thats not including any machine shop process like decking, resurfacing, boring and honing the cylinder block or head. You would need to build a good wooden crate thought to ship it. At this time i don't think driving is an option since state borders are closed off for incoming passengers from out of TX. Hope that helps.
 

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OK, this is my opinion only so if it contradicts anyone, understand I'm speaking on my experience and it's an opinion based on that.

I highly recommend NOT venting the PVC to atmosphere. On part throttle conditions, you'll lose the intake manifold suction that'll clear the sump of combustion gases that can contaminate the oil. Under boost conditions, you will lose the turbo vacuum draw on the valve cover/sump. This is going to ramp the crankcase pressure up something fierce. It will be even more brutal IF you already have ring wear issues and low compression to begin with. The solution being presented will make things even worse. Think of the factory closed PVC system like a cheap factory racing vacuum pump. People that do this venting mod start popping dipsticks out the engine block under high boost/power. It's also brutal on the environment, and smells nasty like you would not believe, and it leaves a nasty vapor mess in the engine compartment. Yes, this is based on my experience.

I suggest getting a very high quality catch can that is SEALED that can work either between 1) Valve cover and turbo compressor 2) Valve cover and intake manifold. Plenty of threads on this site for catch cans. A sealed catch can on each individual circuit would be best.

I know you said you don't have oil coming out the exhaust, just put that aside for now because it is stopping you from conducting a systematic troubleshooting. I know oil burns, but realize at part throttle you are always burning some tiny amount of oil vapor and don't even see it in the exhaust. The question is "how much" oil can burn and be visibly detectable.

Couple of ways the oil can exit a vehicle:

1) Fluid Leakage (turbo oil feed line, turbo oil return, oil sump pan, valve cover case, timing cover case, block end seal (auto/manual trans) etc.)
2) Piston ring wear leakage (i.e. burned in combustion chamber)
3) Piston ring carbon buildup (i.e. affecting piston oil ring control)
4) Valve guide seal wear (i.e. under vacuum draw/part throttle, burned in combustion chamber)
5) PVC failure (i.e. combustion gas NOT drawn in under vacuum, pushing oil out elsewhere)
6 Vacuum draw turbo (i.e. oil drawn into intake and burned in combustion chamber)
7) Pushed thru turbine gap ring out the exhaust directly (ie. blocked turbo oil return, potentially NOT burned in combustion chamber, maybe not even burned at all, but pushed out the exhaust exit as vapor)

Conducting the PVC function check, compression test, leakdown test, inspection of the exhaust pipe/rear bumper (i.e. oily vapor residue) will help you/mechanic diagnose the problem.

Finally, compression of 125 psi is NOT the factory lower compression spec limit. In fact the Nissan factory spec lower limit is 172.6 psi for the MR16DDT. The motor is a 9.5:1 compression ratio.

You should ideally be doing a "hot" compression test on a good battery/alternator. Even with the throttle snapped shut and checking hot I'm up near 170-180 psi on the Juke with 7-8 cranks, that is critical to get the pressure readings up. I check my compression (1) yearly after doing a carbon combustion chamber cleaning before and after. If you are getting 125 psi on all cylinders then the compression test isn't being done correctly OR the engine is wornout/carbon buildup and of course it's going to burn oil. I get 150-155 psi compression on my EVO X with 9:1 compression ratio, for example, that is within spec.

Find a very good shop/mechanic and tell them what is going on and let them give you the diagnostics, then go from there.

See below the specifications for 2012 year Juke Gen1.

188090


188092
 

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Venting does prevent further break downs cause by sludge build up on the intake runner side of the valve train. Also aswell as the turbo hot side. Let me give you an example. The juke comes oem with this supper small oil feed line that after a while it does get clogged up and potentially damages the 2 race bearing inside the oem compressor turbine. It should be a recall but its not, why upon ask well because its easy dealership and parts money. I seen many customers at the dealership walk out with an easy $800-1000 maintenance fee j+ fuel treatment synthetic to clean the fuel and emission system of the Juke.
what causes it is simple, its sludge carbon build up on the return lines, excessive build up on the intake ports, low resistance on the injectors, or even oil contaminated intercoolers. I tell you this because I assess this many times issue at work, write out an estimate of the labor time + parts included for this simple situation. It's an easy fix just by venting to the atmosphere. But then again everyone is entitled to their own opinion, will I will state, and respect. Im not arguing with you, Im just giving you a clear rational based on evidence base practice from me replacing parts for service + seeing the cashier hefty bill for the client service.

Why do you think BG cleaners, and others like Lukas fuel injection systems are in business. Example we use and sell BG synthetic fuel treatments (380$ fuel treatment which is pretty much sea foam pressurized through the emission lines)

You don't loose pressure because the pressure builds up and comes from the intake plenum / brake booster + the turbine compressor that rotates. Another example is my fully built Juke w/ a 4T turbine, dino on a mustang platform. The numbers safely cut off at 785HP with e85 with out any cylinder pinning, knocking, or detonation. This juke has open vent catch can system w/ duel 2' K&N filters coming from the valve cover, open blow off valve, and external waste gate. The fuel injectors are stock w/ an upgraded fuel cell pump in the tank. I haven't lost any power period on the dino by running all open systems to the atmosphere. I will agree with what you say thought but that is unless your pushing 1,000HP which you is impossible on the 1.6 litter. Only then I would see a need for a Juke to utilize a dry sump- fully enclosed catch can oil system like Toda Racing Japan uses on their Time Attack Tsukuba S2000 for aggresive competitive circuit racing. My evidence is cold hard 8x5 sheets with mustang platform dino numbers and sad + upset clients at work who empty their wallets servicing clogged up valve trains, or emmission related issues due to oil debris. Hope that help man


OK, this is my opinion only so if it contradicts anyone, understand I'm speaking on my experience and it's an opinion based on that.

I highly recommend NOT venting the PVC to atmosphere. On part throttle conditions, you'll lose the intake manifold suction that'll clear the sump of combustion gases that can contaminate the oil. Under boost conditions, you will lose the turbo vacuum draw on the valve cover/sump. This is going to ramp the crankcase pressure up something fierce. It will be even more brutal IF you already have ring wear issues and low compression to begin with. The solution being presented will make things even worse. Think of the factory closed PVC system like a cheap factory racing vacuum pump. People that do this venting mod start popping dipsticks out the engine block under high boost/power. It's also brutal on the environment, and smells nasty like you would not believe, and it leaves a nasty vapor mess in the engine compartment. Yes, this is based on my experience.

I suggest getting a very high quality catch can that is SEALED that can work either between 1) Valve cover and turbo compressor 2) Valve cover and intake manifold. Plenty of threads on this site for catch cans. A sealed catch can on each individual circuit would be best.

I know you said you don't have oil coming out the exhaust, just put that aside for now because it is stopping you from conducting a systematic troubleshooting. I know oil burns, but realize at part throttle you are always burning some tiny amount of oil vapor and don't even see it in the exhaust. The question is "how much" oil can burn and be visibly detectable.

Couple of ways the oil can exit a vehicle:

1) Fluid Leakage (turbo oil feed line, turbo oil return, oil sump pan, valve cover case, timing cover case, block end seal (auto/manual trans) etc.)
2) Piston ring wear leakage (i.e. burned in combustion chamber)
3) Piston ring carbon buildup (i.e. affecting piston oil ring control)
4) Valve guide seal wear (i.e. under vacuum draw/part throttle, burned in combustion chamber)
5) PVC failure (i.e. combustion gas NOT drawn in under vacuum, pushing oil out elsewhere)
6 Vacuum draw turbo (i.e. oil drawn into intake and burned in combustion chamber)
7) Pushed thru turbine gap ring out the exhaust directly (ie. blocked turbo oil return, potentially NOT burned in combustion chamber, maybe not even burned at all, but pushed out the exhaust exit as vapor)

Conducting the PVC function check, compression test, leakdown test, inspection of the exhaust pipe/rear bumper (i.e. oily vapor residue) will help you/mechanic diagnose the problem.

Finally, compression of 125 psi is NOT the factory lower compression spec limit. In fact the Nissan factory spec lower limit is 172.6 psi for the MR16DDT. The motor is a 9.5:1 compression ratio.

You should ideally be doing a "hot" compression test on a good battery/alternator. Even with the throttle snapped shut and checking hot I'm up near 170-180 psi on the Juke with 7-8 cranks, that is critical to get the pressure readings up. I check my compression (1) yearly after doing a carbon combustion chamber cleaning before and after. If you are getting 125 psi on all cylinders then the compression test isn't being done correctly OR the engine is wornout/carbon buildup and of course it's going to burn oil. I get 150-155 psi compression on my EVO X with 9:1 compression ratio, for example, that is within spec.

Find a very good shop/mechanic and tell them what is going on and let them give you the diagnostics, then go from there.

See below the specifications for 2012 year Juke Gen1.

View attachment 188090

View attachment 188092
 

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It's very resourceful and I welcome the insight. I am working on upgrading and maintening critical parts. I picked up my Juke on the East Coast then brought it back to Michigan(GM Town). I would like to travel out of state to have a rebuild as the local repair shops know very little about small foreign cars with turbos. So 90% percent of my attention is under the hood right now. Starting with the main problem of replacing the intake gaskets making the top of the engine wet with oil. It's a common problem I heard. Waiting for a reply. Thanks 😊
 

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OK, couple of points here:

  • The oil feed line was a Nissan TSB if I recall correctly, I could be wrong. That line came with a heatshield wrap to protect it. No idea why it fails but mine was perfect at 80k miles, so was the turbo. I believe maintenance has much to do with it. I never hot shutdown my turbo cars.
  • I am now wondering if the OP is now running without an oil feed restrictor. It's recommended to maintain 40 psi at the CHRA and avoid pushing oil thru the compressor/intake system and also out the turbine section into the downpipe, killing the catalytic converter in the process. All the symptoms he mentions would occur with high oil feed pressure at the turbo.
  • MHI journal bearing turbos all have oil feed restrictors from the factory (i.e. Nissan, Mitsubishi, etc.). I've never have had one fail/clog in 30 years.
  • Yes, venting eliminates the possibility of sludge formation in the intake runners. I still don't recommend it. The intake/exhaust valves still get full of carbon from the DI and lack of fuel wash. Currently there is no practical solution for it without teardown and disassembly. OEM are simply going back to auxilliary port fuel injectors + DI to clean them off.
  • I didn't recommend a dry sump on a street car, but the comparison is valid about vacuum in the valve cover helping ring pack seal which is a side benefit of it.
  • I wouldn't recommend anyone reuse a timing chain. The chain costs $75, the labor a whole lot more than that.
The other stuff you mentioned about your racecar.....I don't know. The fuel requirements for 750 whp on E85 are 2000cc per injectors and 187 lb/hr of fuel pump flow. It's not happening on a stock Juke injector or mechanical fuel pump, sorry I don't believe it unless you added a full auxiliary port injection fuel system. No car on Earth from the factory has that much overhead on the fuel pump and injectors. Let alone the stock fuel line from the fuel tank to the fuel rail having the fuel flow capacity. This is pure fantasy. My EVO X FE is almost having to replace the fuel rail/fuel line just to run 500 hp on E85, and it already comes with 303 hp from the factory. The Juke engine block handling that much power is within the realm of possibility.....if it were sleeved. Any dyno chart you showed me wouldn't convince me to be honest.

You mentioned it, so I commented. To the OP, good luck with your ride.
 

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According to my tuner. An E85 tune wont happen with UPREV. A new Custom ECU yes. Even ECUTEK is limited and can only run a Base E85 map.
 

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TurboTroy,

If you just recently switched the oil feed line to an aftermarket part, that is probably the cause. No car just starts using oil overnight, ring wear doesn’t work that way.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
No this has been happening since I got the car in 2017 with 86,000 miles. The turbo and turbo supply line replacement is just added info so y’all know what has been done and the history of my vehicle. Been monitoring it and fighting it for awhile. Just wasnt sure if these juke are notorious for anything specific.
 
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