Nissan Juke : Juke Forums banner
741 - 760 of 771 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,226 Posts
Discussion Starter · #741 · (Edited)
Spent some time reviewing where to improve the Mamba 5cm^2 turbine housing. After running a few simulations on the CFD computer flow analysis I kind of settled in on where to make the changes. Pulled the turbine housing off the turbo without disconnecting any lines so I could port it out some, took me 15 minutes. The porting took me 3-4 hours though it could be done quicker if I didn't polish the housing and left a stone finish. I've got some options for future turbo upgrades so this is mostly experimental and just making use of the Mamba 19T until I can afford the Garrett G25-550 or retrofit the Subaru FP 68HTA I have laying around. For now, I'm playing with this smaller turbo to max it out. Also, this turbo is a cheap engine "break-in" turbo and serves a purpose.

Turbo porting improvement:

1) Ported the turbine volute "web/tongue", removed 0.5" length, increasing turbine inducer slot area: + 19% increase
2) Ported/moved turbine volute nozzle to ~1.178 in2: +23% increase (equivalent to a 7cm^2 housing)
3) Ported wastegate opening to 0.950" (from 0.860"): +22% increase

Below shows the "before" & "after" of the port work for Item (1). The shiny/machined area between the (2) black marker lines in the left picture is where no flow happens and the turbine wheel is shutoff, not good. This actually isn't a problem on the stock turbine wheel as it's much smaller and that area actually flows exhaust. The larger TD04HL and subsequent machining has now caused this to become a significant flow problem. This is going to be hard to describe but the the turbine volute nozzle is narrow at the right 1st black marker line which is stock. The 2nd marker line is where the volute nozzle is actually a "lot" bigger internally and coincides with the turbine volute just narrowing down to meet the wheel where I modified that slot. This is exactly where I removed material which both unshrouds the turbine wheel but also shifts the A/R ratio up higher into the volute where it's physically bigger. For lack of a better explanation, I've increased the A/R from 5cm^2 to about 7cm^2 though a true 7cm^2 housing would be bigger everywhere, this would still be a big improvement. Also, by doing this I've added +0.5" arc length increase to the turbine inducer slot which will increase flow thru the inducer +19%. Basically this has potentially increased exhaust flow on the "entry" & "exit" of the turbine wheel.

Automotive tire Fixture Rim Carbon Gas
Automotive tire Camera lens Motor vehicle Rim Cameras & optics


For Item (2) on the turbine inlet I don't have much room to work with. But the turbine housing is thicker near the center wall where the wastgate channel sits. The wall thickness generally is approximately 0.145" and care has to be taken to avoid punching thru the housing. Also, there is a step with a sharp 90* bend feeding the wastegate which is not really that good for flow and was an obvious area of improvement. The 2nd picture shows how I increased the A/R ratio by kicking that wall about ~15* off the vertical to create a lead-in nozzle to reduce turbulence (circled red) and also added a blending radius. This also has the effect of increasing the A/R ratio since this spot sits almost exactly where the turbine wheel is now breathing. Again, the first picture is deceptive because the area where the stock housing opens to the turbine wheel is much deeper down and necks down significantly & sits well below the wastegate port, it's hard to show how small the volute nozzle is down there. The 2nd picture the wheel is now venting almost directly across the wastegate where the volute nozzle is much bigger. All of the engine exhaust flow has to pass thru this area until the WG opens, so it's worth fixing this restriction. That area is technically now equal to a 7cm^2 housing though this would still probably flow less it's still a big improvement over stock.

Audio equipment Gas Composite material Auto part Bicycle part
Gas Audio equipment Auto part Electric blue Titanium


Below is a slightly ported 7cm^2 housing off of a 16g-TD05H turbo (not my turbo). This turbine housing size can flow +400 whp all day long believe it or not. Area circled in "red" is the actual flow area. Note how the turbine exducer slot is actually visible in the upper right corner, this is where the A/R location is measured from and it's located high up in the turbine volute. This is precisely why I modified the Juke turbine housing this way, because Mitsubishi already does it and it works. Bigger A/R is better and I currently run a 12cm^2 twin scroll on my daily driver and it spools up as fast as a 7cm^2 with ridiculously low turbine backpressure but either way less backpressure is better. You can also see how the WG passage isn't impeding into the volute nozzle while the Juke favors the WG over flow to the turbine. The way I ported the turbine inlet is more along the lines of what a stock 7cm looks like but I had some limitations on how much material I could remove.

Automotive tire Automotive lighting Rim Gas Automotive wheel system


For Item (3) I'm increasing the wastegate orifice diameter. The WG flapper is 34.85mm and is fairly huge while the WG orifice is only 0.860" diameter. This is fine for a 275 h.p. turbo, not so good for a 350-380 h.p. turbo. Typically if you want to run higher boost levels I say don't touch this. For lower boost you almost will be forced to port this to avoid boost-creep and keep the boost low, depending on exhaust restrictions in the turbo-back. On an unported housing, boost creep wouldn't typically occur because it's just so restrictive the WG bypass will always prefer to go out the WG instead. But having just significantly ported it, I now have to deal with the potential that the stock WG orifice won't keep up and flow might prefer to go back thru the turbine instead. This little mod sort of fixes that problem.

Problem here is the increase in flow area now puts more backpressure & force on the WG valve and will try and lift it while your spooling-up. Thus you still need to run a higher WG spring to clamp it securely if it's ported bigger. So this is a tuning issue and easily solved with a few different WG springs to keep a happy balance. As the pictures below illustrates it's now ported to about 0.950" vs. 0.860" which is a +22% increase in WG flow. Typically you'll want 35-40% WG bypass flow while the remaining exhaust goes thru the turbine wheel, this mod helps keep that happy balance of power/backpressure. From memory this is about the size of the stock WG orifice on a 16g if not bigger so I went with that. Other reason is to maintain plenty of sealing surface for the WG flapper to seal which is also important to maintain spool-up. To port the WG orifice I used a dremel & stone wheel followed by a small 80 grit flapper wheel to make the hole "round". The edges where deburred with a razor blade so the WG flapper will sit flush.

Finally, I cleaned up the big machined step left over from the larger turbine wheel exducer (exit) machining which is situated right near below the wastegate (circled in red). Mamba were kind of lazy not eliminating that machined step. This surface is actually polished and that's kind of important since the gas speeds are up around 1600 ft/s. Any polishing is going to be beneficial so where I could reach I polished it.

Electric fan Corded phone Motor vehicle Kitchen appliance Automotive design
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,226 Posts
Discussion Starter · #742 · (Edited)
Build continues.....

Bought the remaining engine sensors & ignition components from Rock Auto which came out to $870. Oddly enough the OE Nissan coil packs and knock sensor are Chinese brand. I went with Hitachi ignition coil packs, MAF sensor, & Map sensors. The front & rear 02 sensors are Denso & the knock sensor is from NTK/NGK. Also purchased (2) sets of OE NGK Iridium spark plugs but might also look for (1) step colder plugs for higher boost. Highly recommend Rock Auto as the prices are about 40-60% of Nissan and better quality in some cases. All of the old sensors & solenoids are being kept as backups just in case.

The Intake manifold assembly is being reconditioned as well, nothing glamorous. Below is a picture of the vacuum hose routing for the Intake Manifold. I have on order all the gaskets, hoses, clips, bolts, check valves, purge canister etc. to do a proper intake manifold refresh. The stock purge solenoid will be reused but tested as it costs $100 and I won't replace it unless it goes bad. The Intake manifold will get an ultrasonic cleaning and various brackets media blasting and painted gloss black to freshen them up and shiny new bolts installed. This is typical of what it's taking to get everything factory fresh and why these types of builds take a long time. I won't throw any rusted parts or old rotting hoses onto a high performance build and this gives me an opportunity to guarantee there are no vacuum leaks as well. Might replace the throttlebody as the Hitachi T-body from RockAuto is $277 vs. $670 (Nissan/Hitachi) which is a decent price and I'd like to use the original as a backup anyway.

Next up will be the front subframe getting dropped and reconditioned with upgraded subframe polyurethane inserts and a fresh paint job.

Product Packaging and labeling Material property Packing materials Font


Slope Line Font Urban design Parallel
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Very nice, had some free time and read through. Looks like this is going to be a nice little sleeper beast on the street though, I can bet you will end up pulling away from quite a few cars that think they can keep up. With my factory AWD Nismo I had a pickup try to be a major derp one day and pass me on the right when he absolutely shouldn't have even tried. Even with 3 hefty guys (probably around 800 pounds) in the car I closed the gap before the pickup could even get past my back bumper.

I can second RockAuto for parts though. Had to replace the front wheel bearings on my 03 Dakota a few years ago and I was able to get both front bearing assembly for less than the brick and mortar store could do for one side. Later on I swapped injectors because they had all of 200K miles on them and went for the ones from a 2.3L Ford Focus of the same year. Was able to upgrade from a 2 hole injector to a 12 hole injector for 140 bucks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,226 Posts
Discussion Starter · #744 ·
It'll definitely be a sleeper. Most of the engine/trans mods are hidden so only the bolt-ons give it away. Probably will try and get it up to 300 w.h.p. on the dyno but it's going to most likely take a bigger turbo upgrade so that might be a little further into the future. This thread is mostly about building it to be reliable and fun so no pressure on power figures but eventually I'll start pushing the CVT limits.

The AWD/CVT are kind of sneaky quick from a roll. Even off the line it's most times quicker than my 6spd EVO unless I purposely launch it hard. The Rock Auto stuff worked out great except when I purchased the DI fuel injectors, Rock Auto mis-labeled them and they are the wrong injector for the Juke
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,226 Posts
Discussion Starter · #745 · (Edited)
Just wrapped up some of the last of the painting on the engine parts though I still have various ECM brackets and suspension parts to paint.

Engine paint scheme is going to be mostly black at this point. All the zinc plated brackets & vacuum/boost hardlines in the engine that were rusted are now satin/gloss black. I could have zinc plated them but they'd just rust again. This is going to provide low maintenance for cleaning the engine. The VHT SP-139 paint I purchased is almost a dead match for the factory black paint on the various OE painted brackets and motor mounts. The new motor mounts will get painted all black too since they tend to get crusty with the road salt. The valve cover & intake manifold are staying raw black plastic for now as it's too much work to get them painted perfectly and it gives an OE factory look, I'll figure something out later. For charge pipes I might repaint the throttle body charge pipe & compressor outlet pipe wrinkle black. I'm trying to get a little bit less wrinkle then the last time I painted the compressor housing so it's a bit more shiny & harder surface and less matte. The problem is this VHT wrinkle paint is kind of soft when the wrinkle is laid on thick compared to powder coat so it takes some dialing in to tweak that. That softness is making it tricky as the paint tends to easily dent/nick but I think laying down a thinner coat will improve that, more trials are needed.

Anyway, bunch of hard vacuum/boost lines and brackets for the Intake manifold were pretty crusty so they got refinished a satin/gloss black. Little bit tricky painting galvanized parts. Used some 120 grit aluminum oxide blast media @ 40-60 psi, 360 grit Scotch brite, Dupont Paint Prep Solvent, Dupont Etching Primer DAP-1690, & VHT SP-139 Satin Black 550*F paint. Anywhere the temps are higher than 250*F I'd recommend a high temp primer but for this stuff the Dupont DAP-1690 Primer held up to a 285-300*F oven cure so it should work out nicely. Not a professional painter but this VHT paint is damned tricky to spray and nothing like a paint gun in terms of consistency. The Dupont primer lays on super easy, but not the VHT paint. Either getting paint runs or shooting dry. I had to go back and use some Meguire's Ultimate Compound to buff out the paint where there were some dry spots which worked great to correct it so that is my strategy. This paint takes a 200*F @ 1hr over cure which I followed up with a 1-week air harden/cure to get the full surface hardness. I hit a test piece a few times with the tip of a box wrench and it's very difficult to ding/nick the paint or even scratch it. Ironically this VHT SP-139 paint is much tougher than the Cerakote Ceramic coating by a large margin. Previously I tried some Rustoleum Etching Primer on some other parts and the topcoat paint just chipped/flaked off, so I'm sticking with the Dupont Etching Primer as the paint adhesion is extremely good using that. The Dupont Etching primer dries with a rough but consistent ~120 grit surface finish which I just leave without sanding and dry for 2 hours followed by (3) layers of topcoat over it. Seems to be working out for me so I'm sticking with that.

Got the rest of the engine bolts, hoses, brake booster, etc. ordered up from Bill Kay Nissan using the July 4th 15% off Nissan promo. This kind of the last of the "engine" related stuff I needed ordering to finish up the engine build and install the new wiring harness & engine mounts. The engine harness cost me $518 back in January which was a decent price actually. With the war in Ukraine going on & which happen to manufacture many OEM engine wiring harnesses........the latest wiring harness price is $1570. So I'm glad I got most of the critical parts purchased otherwise it'd have cost me a huge amount of money and who knows how long on backorder. Oddly enough most of the OE vacuum hoses are on national backorder for some reason but I'll just have to sit and wait it out but it won't hold me up too much.

I'm now taking a look at the engine bay and prepping to fix some spot rust here and there and laying down primer where I can. I have to remove the brake booster to fix a rust spot and repaint that. Overall the rust situation is very minor but I'd like to take care of it before it spreads. There's a big "surface" rust spot where the front sway bar wasn't centered from the factory and rubbing on the unibody, that's getting fixed. As far as the engine bay color I'll probably get the olive green OE engine bay paint color matched up and purchase a bigger HVLP paint gun. Little bit of a weird color but I kind of like it and being lighter color makes it easier to spot oil/grease for maintenance purposes. The factory had painted the firewall area black, then OE gunmetal gray near the fenders, and the gloss olive towards to front. Kind of a mishmash of color schemes that looks totally bizarre which I'd like to correct. So I'll probably be taking the fenders off the unibody and doing a ton of masking and scuffing the existing paint down to prep it in the next month. Hoping to knock that out quick if I can.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ausjuk33

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,226 Posts
Discussion Starter · #746 · (Edited)
Pics of the Intake manifold after ultrasonic cleaning and the before/after vacuum painted hardlines and solenoid brackets. Took me about 3-4 hrs total to media blast, scotchbrite scuff/smooth, & prime/paint/oven cure all that including waiting between coatings without too much labor. Painting/priming the parts one-by-one seems to work better for me so it takes a bit longer. Getting the correct prep & painting procedure down was really the goal and I made big improvements in paint quality just by using 360 grit scotchbrite after media blasting to smooth things out & switching back to the DP-1690 primer. Rattle can painting can be a real bastard but I think I got it down to a manageable level.

The wire harness zip-tie anchor(s) need to be trimmed down to pass a new zip tie thru it when the engine harness is reinstalled for a secure harness fit. Can't seem to find these as replacement parts so that's how I'm handling that but I could probably find them aftermarket. They are a (1) time use type deal or at least they are when you're in a hurry to yank off the wiring harness....lol. But I'll repurpose the zip-tie anchors in combination with brand new high temp zip ties.

All the engine vac hoses, clips, bolts, purge canister, & purge solenoid are getting new replacements which cost me a small fortune. I plan on keeping all of the OE emissions equipment as much as possible with a few exceptions. Also ordered up a brand new brake master cylinder assembly and all related vac hoses, etc. Regarding vacuum lines, the brake booster vac line has a sneaky check valve built into it with "engine" painted on it so orientation on the intake manifold is critical. Each of those vac hoses requires an expensive $3.50 spring clamp. I'll eventually be switching over to stainless Oetiker clamps on the rest of the boost/vac line fittings where possible but on the intake manifold the plastic nipples require the OE spring clamps to avoid breakage.

The intake manifold looked to be in great shape and never seen above 17 psi so it's getting refurbished which is saving me $517. I'll have to do an intake system 30 psi pressure leak test once the entire engine is buttoned up with the intercooler core just to make certain there are no problems. Also refurbished the plastic valve cover even though I can get it for $127 brand new there was nothing wrong the original. Cleaned up some light oxidation on the sonic brass threaded inserts with a wire wheel dremel attachment. Mahle make the OE Nissan Intake manifold so it's kind of spendy but high quality PA6-GF30 and very tuff stuff. Being plastic this is like having a big phenolic manifold/throttlebody spacer so it's actually an upgrade over a metal intake manifold. This is primarily why the Juke doesn't heat soak near as bad as other vehicles. Weight is 4.6 lbs which is helping to keep the vehicle CG low and centered so another upgrade in that respect. Pretty good design with 9-11" long runners it's more of a mid-rpm type manifold with a decent sized plenum appropriate for a 1.6L motor. Since I'm not going to be spinning the engine higher than 7,500 rpms it'll be plenty enough & pairs nicely with my upgraded Crower cams and Supertech springs. The 60mm OE throttlebody I'm replacing with a brand new Hitachi unit (OEM supplier) from RockAuto since the original has seen 80,000 miles and I can get it for $277.

Name of the game is reliable power so even though I really didn't want to spend in some places I also didn't want to have to keep going back to fix random little things if I can do it all now especially once the engine is reinstalled. Except for the typical aftermarket upgrades (i.e. turbocharger, pistons, rods, headgasket, valve springs, etc.) every other replacement part was purchased directly thru Nissan dealership or the high quality originals/replacements from OE suppliers (i.e. Hitachi, Denso, NGK/NTK, etc.) with few if any exceptions. I learned my lessons with the wrong Bosch injectors purchased from Rock Auto and the cheesy aftermarket timing chain components that you just do not want to substitute for cheap replacement internal engine parts. This is primarily why I wait until Nissan run their periodic online parts sales.

Ironically, although the engine is heavily modified/upgraded in many areas I still tend to prefer to keep stock OE components or modify them where possible since they are factory tested for reliability and fit much better than aftermarket parts. Just the way I build my cars.

Once the latest engine parts I just ordered today come in I can quickly install and button up the engine & move onto other areas of the vehicle.

Light Wood Audio equipment Cable Hardwood



Bicycle part Automotive tire Gas Wood Auto part
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ausjuk33

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,226 Posts
Discussion Starter · #747 · (Edited)
Still waiting on some backordered vacuum hoses for the intake manifold.

Whilst I'm waiting I bought some equipment for my home HVAC replacement. Bought a TurboTorch Extreme brazing kit, Harbor Freight welding table, 4" vise, & other related stuff. Oddly enough this is the first time I've ever owned a vise. The folding welding table is good enough but eventually I'll buy a bigger weld table with a fixturing kit for any serious builds, for now it'll be enough to get me by with the Tig welder.

Never have high temp brazed before so this was kinda fun and frustrating. Got the Turbotorch Air/Acetylene extreme kit. If you guys have ever used a MAPP/Pro torch with silver solder this thing is another dimension and lots closer to an Oxy/Acetylene setup without the hassle though the heat is less concentrated/focused. Little bit shocking as the torch sounds like a jet engine on full after-burner. The flame temp is about 2700 *F vs. 2150 *F for Mapp/Pro gas. Got a -5A and 8A torch tip extreme for 1/4" & 1/2" HVAC refrigeration lines. The gas use is about 5.7 & 8.5 cfh rating and tank is an MC tank 10 cft, theoretically about 1-2 hours of brazing capacity. Brazing rod is Sil-fos 15 which is 15% Silver, 5% Phosphorus, 80% Copper with a melt point of about 1475 *F. This isn't silver solder though but does have silver in it. I overcooked a few fittings using the -8A torch with the LucasMilpaut (Braze mfr) recommendation getting them "red hot" and then touching off the joint with the braze rod. Didn't like the amount of joint oxidation that level of heat produced but the braze penetration was outstanding with the braze flowing out the other end forming an internal pipe fillet. Next I dropped down to the smaller -5A torch tip & tried what pretty much everyone does which was to use the torch heat to bring the copper pipe to a cooler "dull-gray" color and then just dip the rod into joint while bringing the torch outer cone flame into it to melt it. Using the torch flame to pull the braze thru the joint by heating the coupler. Finished off with a bit of a fillet cap on the outer joint to seal-up any areas that might not have filled completely in the lapp-joint. This braze rod doesn't "flow" like solder as it stays kinda "muddy" and you push it around with the braze rod, fully capable of filling large clearance gaps unlike silver solder. Anyway, I then quickly quench the solidified joint with a wet rag and most of the oxidation comes right off. Seems the guys using Oxy/Acetylene can get a nice shiny silver joint but with my rig this is about as good as I can get it and close to what most guys using a TurboTorch can achieve and what my current HVAC setup looks like.

This technique allows me about 60-70 s of torch time and used maybe 15% of the 20" braze rod for (1) joint. The MC tank (10 cft) is lasting a bit longer with the smaller -5A tip and the HAZ zone is much smaller and things don't overheat near as much. Probably a skilled guy could braze 30-40 joints with the smaller MC acetylene tank which is great for a DYI setup. Cost me $35 to refill it locally and it's a bit safer having a smaller/portable tank though definitely expensive vs. filling a bigger B-tank (40 cft). I'm not showing the Nitrogen back purge thru the inside copper pipe as that kit is coming later. Final pic is me sectioning the finished joint and polishing it so I could check it under magnification for the braze penetration which is visible as a silver color against the copper. There is (1) small gap where the tube clearance was basically zero so the braze couldn't quite fill it but that is what the braze fillet is for to cap that off just in case. Think it should hold fine for an R22 or R410A HVAC setup. I briefly considered push-lok o-ring fittings (Zoom-lock) but figured it was better to simply spend the money for a brazing rig & learn how to braze and do it right. I could also have Silver Soldered which is way way easier that brazing but it's much less durable and NOT recommended for R410A pressures. The brazing joint strength is something like 60,000 to 100,000 psi tensile strength if done correctly.

LucasMilpaut have a hyper detailed FAQ for braze joint clearance vs. tensile strength and all the brazing technical data.


Still on order is the Nitrogen purge kit to backpurge the HVAC lines during brazing, purging, and for high pressure testing the system. Need to also get the refrigerant recovery pump, vacuum pump, recovery tank, weight scales, etc. Then I can service the entire system complete. Brand new A/C system is +$5,000. I can get the evap A-coil for about $550, TXV valve for $120, and Condensor/Pump for $1250 shipped. So.....I'll be doing the install. With all the tooling + HVAC setup I'm still under $5,000 but now I have the tooling to do an A/C repair/replacement any time I need to. Kinda puts some Juke upgrades on hold but the build will continue as planned.

Also bought a bunch of toys for the AHP Tig welder but still waiting on the Argon Tank (80 cft.) and a tungten electrode grinder. At some point I'll go over that setup so I can start fabbing up the 2.75" downpipe and 3" catted midpipe. Got some fun projects for the aluminum compressor inlet pipe and a nice CAI setup. That'll come probably over the winter as I'm slammed trying to fix my HVAC and the Juke at the same time.

Gas Automotive exterior Machine Auto part Electronic device


Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Natural material Font


Drinkware Light Automotive lighting Kitchen appliance Fluid
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,494 Posts
you're becoming a jack of all trades. HVAC is one of those things I'll leave to a pro. I've watched a number of YouTube channels on commercial and residential HVAC service. I understand most of it, but those guys have some serious skill with not just servicing a unit, but sizing a unit for air flow, tonnage, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,226 Posts
Discussion Starter · #749 · (Edited)
Yeah, spent the last 2 weeks watching YouTube channels to prep for this...lol. Kinda like cramming for an engineering test. It's tricky no doubt but with the correct tooling and service procedures definitely doable for a DYI if one were inclined. Didn't want to do HVAC but having (2) homes is almost forcing me to become an expert in pretty much whatever needs to be fixed.....sigh. When I'm rich I'll outsource this and all the car stuff to the pros and sit back with a beer and watch.

My refrigeration book is coming next week since the procedure's are insanely complex it's almost mandatory but very doable if the correct steps are maintained, almost like a cook book. The link below is for AC Service Tech LLC. That guy's YouTube channel(s) are so methodically detailed and by far the most knowledgable A/C site I could find. I'll be buying his $68 HVAC book to prep for my install while I wait on equipment to come in. I'm upgrading to a 2.5 Ton A/C setup which is a small upgrade over my existing 2 Ton and just about what my current electrical line can support to keep things simple and easier.


Here is a masterful Oxy/Acetylene HVAC install making it look so damned easy, definitely this dude is a pro.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I am going to be doing some HVAC stuff as well but probably next year sometime. Currently using window AC's and heat is a couple spacer heaters and a gas wall unit along with some GPU's hashing crypto. Actually used to used the GPU's to heat my apartment and only on the coldest days did I need much more than that but this house SUCKS for that stuff. Insulation is still going in and sometime next month I am going to order 24 sheets of the XPS foam insulation and pick up a few rolls or 24" cavity R19 insulation for the ceiling of the front porch which is actually the floor for part of the upstairs.

I am doing mini splits on my install but everything there will be flare fittings though the two for the upstairs I am probably going to have to make my own line sets since the factory ones are only 10 feet. Actually debating cutting the line sets for the downstairs to the exact length I need and do away with the extra line as well. But by the time I am done installing 8 mini splits I should be about as expert as you can get. Honestly I think this place is huge and it's actually going to be bigger when I get done since the house is growing by 3.5 inches all the way around on the outside and upstairs there are two sections where it will be simple to take down a couple walls and grow the rooms by about 15 sq feet instead of wasting the space. It was sold as being 1400 sq feet but the footprint of the house is about 50 X 30 and the upstairs is about 20 X 50 so I don't see how that is possible and figure it's closer to 2100 sq feet. But when I am completely done there will be a exact measurement done of each room and hallway. That is why it's 8 mini splits, 6 rooms downstairs and 2 will be upstairs not including the bathrooms (got to build the 2nd one upstairs) and the back porch.

Downstairs is a combination of 10.5 and 10 foot ceilings but those will drop to 9 foot ceilings when I am done since I am running the electrical and datacomm lines along the ceilings of the rooms. The height helps some in the summer but sucks in the winter so dropping them down to 9 foot will help keep it a little warmer in the winter while also helping to reduce noise from upstairs to downstairs. I think that getting the insulation in and the crawlspace sealed up will help a ton with the cooling and not be effected as much by the ceiling change.

I watch a couple refrigeration and HVAC guys on YouTube though, but have learned a lot of info I have been able to put with watching a few techs replace some outside units for central HVAC when I was in an apartment. Had like 20 of them get damaged in a hail storm so got to watch a ton and even saved one of them from screwing up because he hadn't pulled a vacuum on the unit nor had he brazed a line but was going to open the valves on the condenser unit. Not sure how much R410 costs but I wouldn't want to pay for it from a stupid mistake.

My main thing for the mini splits is I want to find something I can hook in to HomeAssistant to control things but I have heard that while they have USB ports on the units the adapter isn't actually using USB but are instead using UART for communications and you can get adapters that are already setup to work with HomeAssistant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,226 Posts
Discussion Starter · #751 · (Edited)
I'd recommend a good HVAC install manual if you are dead-set on doing it yourself. Brazing copper with refrigerant is extremely extremely dangerous, I can't stress this enough. Without Nitrogen purging you can create phosgene gas when heating R22/R410a which is insanely lethal. Secondly, the refrigerant is 100% flammable so there is a risk of a home explosion unless the lines are 100% Nitrogen purged with venting prior to brazing. This is why I'm using Nitrogen purge setup to push all the refrigerant out of the copper lines. I'm not recommending this to anyone as the risks are astronometrically very high.

R410a isn't too bad which is about $69 per lb while R22 is more like $75 per lb. Typical install is about 4-6 lbs of refrigerant. I may switch to R407c which is a direct R22 replacement but I might also switch to R410A. The 407c is about $36 per lb so I might just switch over to that. I purchase my refrigerant from www.abilityrefrigerants.com.

I'm not recommending to anyone that they do their own HVAC repair but if you must please be prepared and do your research. There is an online HVAC certification for $25 which I'm going to complete prior to my install. This will allow a DYI home owner to do an install legally.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Thankfully I don't have to braze a thing. It's all flare fittings so just need to make sure they are torqued correctly and the system is vacuumed well. Takes a lot of the stress out of figuring the install out.

BTW the 25.00 certification is only good for window A/C's refrigerators and things like that. For true HVAC units it's actually a bit more and can not be done online. https://www.hvwtech.com/hvac-certification/ The 25.00 certification is EPA 608 Type 1. The EPA 608 Type 2 certification is the required cert for residential HVAC units.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,226 Posts
Discussion Starter · #753 · (Edited)
Good luck with the flare fitting. I'll have to look into the Type 2 cert but I'm not too concerned with it for my own installs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,226 Posts
Discussion Starter · #754 ·
Yeah, so got everything needed for the engine from Nissan dealership except my new brake booster assembly, still on backorder. I just need to order up a throttlebody from RockAuto and then I'm completely done with the engine. I'm thinking maybe this/next weekend I can get the intake manifold assembly on along with the engine wiring harness. Got the (2) optional OEM engine lifting brackets so I'll probably install those as well with a set of high strength bolts. I've decided to skip painting the valve cover for now as I don't have time to waste if the paintjob doesn't come out right. The VHT wrinkle coat can be tricky and there is no easy way to strip paint off of a plastic valve cover.....thus you get (1) shot at it.

This weekend I can do the cylinder leakdown test to check the ring seal to confirm nothing is wrong. Cylinder head was already vacuum tested when I did the valve job and it was air tight with no leak decay down to 24 in-Hg. At some point I'm going to hook-up an engine oil pre-lube fixture to check for high pressure oil leaks and also pre-lube the engine prior to startup. Might do that in a few weeks but need to order up a Mishimoto oil filter housing adapter for the oil hookup.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ausjuk33

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,226 Posts
Discussion Starter · #756 · (Edited)
It's getting there, some boring stuff and some interesting stuff. This isn't as much a build as it's turning into a vehicle restoration but that'll kinda transition back into performance once the engine drops in and I get to tuning and what not. Waiting on parts from the dealership has really pushed back my schedule but also the time has helped me save up to finish the build. I have about $3,000 left to "finish" the build which is mostly chassis/suspension/braking/half-shafts etc. just to refurbish back to new condition. Inflation is starting to affect my build and I got really lucky buying most of my parts before that became a factor.

Later on I'll drop the rear suspension/subframe and do a complete refurb/upgrade but I can take my time next year in the summer when I have the EVO X to drive daily. Next I'm finishing up the last of the internal CVT transmission upgrades that are sitting here on the bench as I did some additional upgrades after I completely rebuilt the CVT, thus I have to tear it down again at least partly. That shouldn't take me more than a day or two with some custom machining required to fit that into the transmission, no big deal. Those are crucial to this build otherwise it's somewhat pointless but it's gotta be done. That'll kinda be interesting to a few AWD folks so my CVT build is going to start picking up the pace again for sure in the next month or two.

If I can get in with AMS for a baseline tune I might flatbed the Juke there for the engine break-in which is only like 5 miles from my house. I'll get into this later but I'm switching from ECUTek over to the UpRev Tuner so I can tune it myself. As much fun as I had dealing with John V. (sarcastic) for ECUTek tuning I'd rather never again deal with a tuner if I can help it though I'm sure there are great tuners out there. I've been doing my own ECM tunes since 1998 so it'll be nice to have control over the Juke ECM without having to deal with that hassle. Also getting a Nissan Consult software ($650) for pairing and reflashing the TCM with updates and advanced ECM functions. Did that with my current EVO X (MUT-III SE) and it was nice to have a dealer tool in case I need a new ECM paired or advanced diagnostic functions. Probably I'll need a 30 day exemption for emissions when I apply for vehicle registration just to get the emissions drive cycles learned on the street and I'm hoping the cams don't throw an engine code but we will see. Everything else on the vehicle will be 100% emissions legal as this is my daily driver.

Pretty much stuck to my original game plan so it's all coming together slowly but surely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,226 Posts
Discussion Starter · #757 · (Edited)
Did some work last night and got the valve cover & gasket put on so now I can proceed to some system checks. Did some polishing of the OE plastic valve cover and it came out nicely so for now I'll skip painting it, just a wax job every so often to keep it shiny. My phone camera is going out on me so I might have to switch to my compact camera instead.

OK, so I did a preliminary cylinder leakdown check.

Cyl #1 is at 1% leakage (99 psi of 100 psi)
Cyl #2 is at 1% leakage (99 psi of 100 psi)
Cyl #3 is at 1% leakage (99 psi of 100 psi)
Cyl #4 is at 1.5% leakage (98.5 psi of 100 psi)

My right side pressure gauge (cylinder side) is actually reading about 1 psi low due to a calibration issue but generally I use it anyway as a reference, doesn't need to be NASA level accurate. Might swap to a new calibrated gauge set at some point but for now I use what I got at hand. Leakdown was done at TDC which means top dead center on the compression stroke for each piston. After engine break-in this will be repeated as it may obviously change. This is checking my piston seal/gap, cylinder bore machining, cylinder head intake/exhaust valve seal, & head gasket seal. I used the Carrillo recommended piston ring gap clearances about in the middle nominal range for a boosted application so it's all pretty safe/reliable settings. All the piston rings were staggered according to the service manual and the Carrillo guidelines, seemed to have helped. I have the OTC crank pulley holder but in this case didn't need it to hold the piston at TDC but I did use it to rotate the crankshaft. Engine rotates smoothly with the expected torque though the stiffer valve springs bumped that up a little bit which was to be expected. All looks good so far basically.....knock on wood.

At this point I leave the spark plugs out so I can periodically shoot some SeaFoam Deep Creep oil in the bores to fog/preserve them until the engine fires over later this fall/winter. Little bit of a critical step to avoid rust on the piston rings & cylinder bores especially in these humid conditions but no issues with that so far. The spark plug wells get little plastic red caps to cover them until the plugs get installed.

I'll install the intake manifold assembly & new engine wiring harness possibly this weekend and it's finally done until the CVT transmission is mated. The flexplate & starter has to be installed on the engine hoist but before the transmission is mated as the engine stand is blocking me from accessing it.

Next up:

Will be testing in the next few weeks the Summit Racing oil prelube rig to check for oil leaks. Valve cover needs to come back off to confirm proper oiling of the upper cam galleries. Right before engine fireup I'll prelube a final time. Those are really about the last pre-checks aside from typical spark, fuel, oil level, coolant level/pressure testing, A/C charge, etc. etc.

Automotive tire Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Bumper Gas


White Light Gauge Scale Measuring instrument
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ausjuk33

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,226 Posts
Discussion Starter · #758 ·
Been looking at getting some additional wrenches for my older USA made Craftsman set. Kind of hard to make a decision. Not too worried about matching sets of tools as I have a mix of everything but I do usually buy full sets. I prefer the long/12 pnt closed end offset Professional Craftman wrenches for breaking stuff loose, those are a favorite as they are thin and fit in tight/deep spots. The Gearwrench ratching box/combo wrenches I almost exclusively grab those if I'm looking at getting a job done quickly. Kobalt seem pretty good too and I have a few sockets and their locking extensions are super nice and exactly what I needed to avoid dropped sockets. The FACOM brand are what I'm looking at lately as they have that Euro style and well respected. I used to design medical instruments so I definitely can appreciate a good hand tool but the choices are endless these days.

Very surprising results of a box/combo wrench failure test amongst all of the various tool brands:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,226 Posts
Discussion Starter · #759 · (Edited)
Got the engine wiring harness and intake manifold on last night temporarily. Have to adjust a few things as I need some slack on the exhaust cam position plug as it's tugging on the connector, otherwise it's mostly connected/wired up. Definitely not as easy as it looks in a few places the wiring harness doesn't route intuitively but I used a few images from the web to get my bearings and figure it out. All of the connectors are polarized and short enough that they only fit the sensor locations and nowhere else so that made it easier but I still struggled. Factory use some very nice heat shielding on the wiring harness and made improvements over the years but in (1) spot on the front timing cover there is a gap in the heat shielding right next to the downpipe which would probably cook the harness so I'll have to order up some heat shield to wrap it but no big deal. Need to install the Front & Rear 02 sensors and cap the 3rd 02 sensor position until I install the wideband 02. I'm going to swap back to the new factory exhaust manifold locking nuts which I just purchased and then bolt down the downpipe & d/p support bracket. Really just some finishing details. Once the new throttlebody comes in from Rock Auto I can connect the turbo coolant line and then any remaining liquid/electrical connections get made on the vehicle after the engine is installed. Lot's and lot's of coolant ports and vacuum ports that need to be checked/connected but not to bad actually. The factory add-on lift hoist brackets worked out great and I'm looking forward to using those for the install, they'll be permanently installed and shouldn't get in the way.

I'll shoot some pics but it's finally starting to look like a proper engine. I'm digging more of the factory look and I painted most of the engine brackets a gloss enamel black and it looks really good with the satin polish aluminum of the engine. That will basically wrap up the engine build though I'll follow up once the tuning begins.

The CVT as I mention will now take me about 2-3 weeks to wait on some parts & partially teardown and upgrade the clutch-packs and install the upgraded oil pump. I won't be able to mate the CVT and engine together until the engine is about to be installed since I don't have room in the garage to support them both on the hoist for storage.

More updates to follow but I'll be focusing more on the suspension & subframe upgrades and then it'll all start coming together.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
12,820 Posts
Anyway to make an extension for the cam phaser ?

I just put my main gaming rig in a new case. Had to buy some motherboard fan header 4 pin extensions for the top mounted fans.
 
741 - 760 of 771 Posts
Top