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Lets hope it wont burn up.

Did you blow torch a small piece to test it ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #722 · (Edited)
Good point Mac. It'll get tested on the vehicle but I'll be carrying a fire extinguisher from now on for sure for many other reasons.
Elbow is rated 60*F-450*F (ASTM E84 25/50 for Flame and Smoke) and the woven fiberglass is good to about 1100*F ignition temps.

Keep in mind my setup also has full ceramic coating of the CHRA and turbine/manifold/downpipe/testpipe. Cerakote supposedly have tested the ceramic coating and skin temps don't run higher than 915*F with an EGT of 1690*F based on their lab testing.

The setup doesn't have the turbine heatshield or downpipe shields in place yet, working on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #724 · (Edited)
I want to see your juke exhaust glowing red hot! Haha
I'll do my best....lol. If it goes up in a ball of fire at least it'll be glorious, you guys get first dibs on the video.

Think I've settled on a downpipe/testpipe heat shielding solution that I can accept. Definitely not going to pipe "wrap" the downpipes as this causes pipe oxidation and overheating. Heat-Shield Products makes a very well engineered aftermarket exhaust pipe shielding. OE designs are probably better but require some serious tooling to form the steel shields. To compare, I've reviewed some of my stock downpipe/midpipe OEM designs (Juke/EVO/STi) and sure enough it's just a steel clamshell over an exposed fiberglass matting so the concept is sound.

You can see that these particular Heat Shield Armor shields have their Biocool insulator matting. However, there is a pre-determined "gap" in the shield that is required to prevent meltdown. It's specifically designed for the pipe diameter you specifiy and leaves about 1/4 of the pipe diameter exposed for heat release to prevent meltdown. I'm running full 304 stainless downpipe so it can easily handle the temp increase even with the ceramic coating. I also like the hook/wire design as it prevents from crushing the shielding though it's not as clean/pretty as the stainless steel zip ties. They do offer 304 SS springs to attach the shield as well if you want to go full-out. Common problem is crushing/wrinkling the shields but you can see in the link if it's installed correctly the shields end up looking fairly crisp and non-wrinkled.

Motoiq have a really good review on a Dodge Viper and they "pie" cut the shielding to form around bends and use the stainless zip ties and it looks immaculate. They kind of make fun of the disco style "gold" foils which are nowhere near as effective.


I'll be running a 2.5" diameter x 12" section and then custom cutting another to about 8" length. The stock OE upper downpipe heatshield is going to get slightly modified, removing the riveted ear portion, and then double-ceramic coated and I'm putting that back on as well since it'll be tough to form something around that bend without it looking like an arts/crafts project.

Turbine heatshield I've designed a custom version on Solidworks and getting quotes for laser cutting and CNC press brake forming.


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Discussion Starter · #725 · (Edited)
Just received my Heatshield Armor kit (12" x 36" x 1/2") for the downpipe/testpipe heat shielding. Purchased the rivet hook/wire kit(s) for securing the heatshield and keeping it tight without crushing it. Also purchased some 5/16" wide stainless steel zip ties as an alternative for mounting. A steel hole punch kit was added for punching clean/crimped holes thru the shields for various bosses & 02 bungs. Final price w/shipping came out to $198 from Summit Racing.

This shielding is rated to 1800*F continuous/2200*F intermittant & the insulation sits directly onto the tube/pipe. For those that might wonder if using header wrap would work better, no it won't based on their own testing. There is a lot of debate over header wraps but I won't touch that crap. The Heatshield Armor has a similar texture to the OEM aluminum heatshielding but a little bit thinner at .008-.010" though it's still quite rigid it still can be easily formed over tube/pipe. It's recommended to install with a 1-2" gap running lengthwise along the tube/pipe for heat dissipation and preferably towards the ground/road.

There's still some work in tracing out a profile template onto 22"x28" poster board and creating the flat blank. I laid out a trial fitment with some aluminum foil to see where the material will wrinkle and require some relief cuts.



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Discussion Starter · #726 ·
Upper downpipe shielding installed. It took awhile to cut template after template to make sure it fit right. The shielding is about 1/2" thick and this causes the material to shrink when you wrap it so you lose material length. So in retrospect you need to cut an additional 1" to account for the bend wrap or shrink. Then another 1" for a 0.5" wide 90* folder over on each edge to seal up the insulation as recommended.

I know it looks like terrible but the gap in the shielding is there on purpose to prevent the downpipe from melting down. Heatshield Products recommended a 2-3" gap on turbocharged engines and it's right about 2-2.25" on the 2.5" downpipe so I'm right there. You can see I'm aiming the gap back towards the exhaust manifold heatshield for the upper wrap since there is no other safe direction to orient the gap. The 2nd piece for the lower downpipe the gap will be rotated towards the ground, this is why I split the shielding in (2) pieces. I left some extra material for that lower downpipe shield to wrap over the top of the 1st piece to finish it off. Additionally, every edge has to be folded either 90* or a hem edge like I did near the downpipe flange. This is to prevent water from entering the insulation

Overall a very difficult material to work with but if you take your time and pie cut the flat blank and add additional length to trim and fold back it's not too bad. There are always going to be some wrinkles but because the material is heavily dimpled it's kinda stiff as well. You kinda have to form it and bend it into position and work it into place. The stainless zip ties are really the only way to go as they are 5/16" wide and don't crush the shielding when pulled tight.

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