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OUCH. Now that sucks and squirrel damage is real.
 

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Discussion Starter · #562 ·
Yep,

They hit my EVO back in 2016 and took a bite out of the main harness. Came back again late last year and again cut thru the main harness right at the firewall which was hell to repair, the exhaust cam oil solenoid harness, power steering switch, hood latch sensor harness. Also ate the top of the coolant bottle clean off. Only thing that saved the engine harness from total obliteration was the Plastic Engine Cover otherwise it would have been a massacre. Most of it I repaired and you can't tell, but they like to nibble on the connector itself which are near impossible to buy without the main harness, so the little bastards do some serious damage. The entire fuel injector harness was protected under the engine cover otherwise I'd be looking at $2,000 to replace it.

He also took out the Juke as well, but I replaced most of the damage. My neighbor's truck took a hit for $5,000. He started placing traps......and it worked. Other neighbors are a bunch of complaining babies so he took some heat for the dead squirrels. He beat me to the punch on laying traps, I was thinking other methods of the projectile variety but given I'm in a townhouse neighborhood that's a no-go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #563 ·
Ordered the MUT-III programmer for the Mitsubishi and should be coming in around June 9th. I'll register the used ECM I got off of ebay to the VIN and then reflash to my latest tuned EVOScan & ECUFlash firmware. Really amazing how complex these modern cars are. Even something as simple as registering new TPMS sensors isn't possible without the dealer tool or another aftermarket handheld programmer. So hopefully the MUT-III will allow me to replace ECMs in the future without the hassle of having to hit the dealership. All in with the used 2015 ECM and MUT-III programmer it's coming in around $890 with tax/shipping which isn't too terrible. Had I went to the dealership and bought a new ECM and had it registered probably it would be in the $1200-$1500 range.

Going to be redoing the harness repair and double confirming the short has been completely eliminated.

I thought I was careful with the wire repair using multiple layers of heat shrink tubing but those butt-splice connectors are kinda tricky to deal with and it abraided thru the heat-shrink and shorted the ECM. The heatshrink tubes shrunk so much they pulled and stretched over the sharp butt-splice connector and cut thru the jacket. Next time I'm using bare wires inter-twined and soldered directly which will produce the strongest joint and without any sharp edges, then heat shrink over that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #564 ·
Received the ebay MUT-III programmer. Holy hot hell what a mess that was. It'll only load in Windows 7 and uses Internet Explorer 11 as the software. The VCI device which is a brown box was sort of working and now not working so Windows is turning the communication off. The software installation was intensive and some things like service manuals weren't loaded. Basically this is a $500 paperweight. The software I can use with a solution below, but it was an expensive lesson on buying China Ebay products. The MUT-3 software is too powerful to not try and get to work as it controls literally everything on the car plus calibration of all critical sensors.

Luckily, I found this down below for writing the existing VIN into a new ECM:


This generally does many of the same functions as the Mitsubishi tool as VIN registration of the ECM and ETACS computers but not the Key fob programming, that costs extra for another software, this one was free. It uses the Tactrix Open 2.0 cable I already own for the ECUFlash I run, so this was actually a zero dollar solution to get me rolling. The used ECM cost me $252 and it was the same 2015 make/model year of my car and looked in great condition.

Additionally, the vendor also offers a Mut-3 Driver or Bridge software. This uses the same Tactrix cable instead of the Mitsubishi VCI brown box and software to communicate with the Mitsubishi MUT-3 software which still is extremely powerful. This will be a long term solution to getting every functionality the Mitsubishi Dealer has and is a good investment for things like new ECMs, TPMS calibration, key fob registration, ETACS/ECM/ABS/KOS/AYC reflashing to the latest firmware, etc.


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Could probably find a win7 ebay laptop OR run vms (virtual machine) with win7 as the OS. The only hard part (without having researched it) would be getting win7 installed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #566 ·
Yep, was looking for ebay laptops then I kind of calmed down and starting working the old google search......life saver.

There is an Oracle Virtual Mut-3 bridge software called "ETACSDecoder" that'll run in Windows 7 just fine in virtual mode and it communicates between the Mut-3 Diagnostic software and the Tactrix Open 2.0 (i.e. JF2534 OBD plug). It's a little bit convoluted for my tastes working in a virtual window, but it works pretty damned good and basically helps communicate with the MUT-3 and the Tactrix plug. There is a youtube link for how it works.That is my backup plan if all else fails since I already paid big money for the MUT-3 software, VCI, and cables so I want to salvage that functionality. The MUT-3 interface is hideous but what it can do is insane. I also found the Key fob password codes for all Mitsubishi vehicle for registering new key fobs, something you typically have to call Japan to get access to.


I like the Russian software "Mut-3 Driver" because it's just a simple piece of bridge software that installs on Windows 7 normally that basically handshakes the hardware and MUT-3 software to facilitate the ECM connection, much like the VCI does. The VCI box is a bastard to work with and I think mine is completely fried. Keep in mind this is an Ebay China clone, not the real Mitsubishi MUT-3 setup. The Tactrix OBDII plugs are like $150 or cheaper on ebay and that is mainly what I use on ECUFlash and EVOScan, so it's really nice because it's so damned reliable.

I just flashed the used EVO X ECM to the current vehicle VIN in 5 minutes using the freeware software. Then I flashed my custom ECUFlash 23 psi/Big MAF tune in another 5 minutes and I was ready to rock and roll. I believe I fried the coil driver (MOSFET/FET) on the old ECM that pulses the VVT-exhaust cam oil solenoid due to a short circuit in the wiring harness. But also I think the solenoid is dead or locked up too. That is how I'm deducing the difference in DTC codes (P0013 vs. P0017) between the new and old ECM's. I ran EVOScan and found the VVT-Exhaust cam was dead and not phasing according to the VVT-exhaust map, DTC showing P0017 as well. So after all this ********, the exhaust cam oil solenoid is dead or its locked up. The exhaust cam sensor is brand new so I think I found the problem. Basically the exhaust manifold cooks both the cam position sensor and the cam solenoid.

Little bit off topic but this is what we EVO X owners have to deal with.
 

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I can load you WIn7 Ultimate on a laptop etc. I would just need it here to do. Easy peasy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #568 · (Edited)
Appreciate the offer Mac, but it seems to have installed perfectly on Windows 10 on my Netbook I use for tuning, read below.

Seems the MUT-III VCI "box" or basically the OBDII-plug which has it's own circuit board and firmware which needed to be updated by running MUT-III SE software first. Then when I did that it started doing a firmware (version 3.65) download to the MUT-3 VCI box which is sort of a standalone programming handheld but also an interface with the PC. Nowhere in the owner's manual does it state there is a VCI firmware capability or requirement for this. I got lucky cycling thru menus and forcing it to download the firmware from the MUT-III SE software as it was blind luck. There is a green light and a "P<-V" symbol on the LCD of the VCI box that shows communicating is active between the PC and VCI. Also having the right VCI drivers is key as the USB in Windows device manager will name it "Vehicle Control Interface" but this is all automatic on the install with Win10.

{Edit: The MUT-III manual on pg 126-130 goes into the Troubleshooting section for VCI firmware update process, probably should have read that first before jumping into the installation.}

If anyone buys one of these Ebay China MUT-III setups I'll write a FAQ for getting it to work. This software loaded extremely clean on Windows 10 with zero errors, but it was also software I loaded from the MMCoding Forums and the files (version PRE-18091-00) were zipped/compressed and I'm betting "Kolyandex" from MMCoding Forums tweaked/cleaned them up to allow a perfect install. The MUT-III software in the supplied CD-Rom (version PRG-15061-00) from Ebay gave me errors on the Windows 7 Professional installs I tried plus they were 2015 files and much older. I use a small Netbook with Win10 anyway for ECU reflashing/tuning so it works out great this way. Again, everything from China needs some serious tweaking to work right, but it finally did.

Keep in mind that on that Russian coding website the MUT-3 software is FREE with download links to all latest versions of the Mitsubishi software. And he also created a MUT-3 driver software (replaces the VCI box) for $150 and another $100 for a Tactrix Open 2.0 cable that does the identical thing I paid $625 on Ebay for. So that is a better/simpler option IMHO to obtain the full Mitsubishi MUT-3 and MUT-3 SE dealer software for all vehicles. This beats paying $8,000 for the Mitsubishi setup with the Panasonic Toughbook, software, VCI, and cables. I found a good condition used OEM setup for $2,200 with full laptop and software but only I'd do it if I were running a shop as these setups also have the software license/updates for obtaining all the interactive service manuals which mine doesn't have.

Functionality is amazing as it's the full dealer diagnostic/reprogramming tool that can reflash/reprogram the ABS/AYC/ETACS/ECM/TCM/KOS and just about anything else you could want to do with the vehicle. Anyway, I'm calling it done on this software stuff for now as it finally works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #569 · (Edited)
OK, so back to the EVO X Exhaust Cam solenoid problem. So it was still throwing a P0017 which is almost always the solenoid has failed, but the ohm readings were 7.9 ohms. However, I removed it and powered it on a 12V benchtop power supply while inverting the power/ground leads to cycle it and test it. The exhaust cam solenoid was banging so I figured it was totally fine but kind of perplexing then why it wasn't working on the vehicle.

I might also mention a dead exhaust cam phaser solenoid also runs the car lean at idle, so I was throwing 02 sensor codes as well. Anyway, I threw it back onto the car running EVOScan datalogger and sure enough the exhaust cam phaser solenoid came back to life and was now adjusting at idle and while revving it......perfect. The P0017 code went away as well for now. Basically, I have a bad/flaky solenoid that likely froze/locked up. I'll probably drive around with this solenoid for awhile till next month when I have the money to throw a new one on.

Very tricky diagnostics plus that damned MUT-III install gave me hell. I might test the original ECM to confirm the coil driver was blown or not. I'm thinking it might have been perfectly fine but now I have (2) ECM's with my custom ECUFlash flash tune firmware loaded up on both in case I brick an ECM in the future.

The Juke will in any case be running brand new Nissan VVT Intake/Exhaust cam solenoids for this very reason as they get funky with heat/age.
 

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Discussion Starter · #570 ·
King Bearings are coming in tomorrow. 4 weeks lead time is kind of ridiculous but that is the new normal these days.

On the fence about grinding the bearing notches off or machining grooves into the engine block & main caps with a dremel. Probably decide when I get them. With a micrometer measuring the bearing thickness it's easy to check if there is a mistake grinding the notches down. More time and precision required but less mucking with the engine block.

Otherwise, not spending too much time thinking about the Juke these days. When these parts arrive I should be able to finally assembly the rods, pistons, crank and get the short block buttoned up quickly. The cylinder head valve lash caps need ordering and I have some machining on a few of the Ford valve retainers to lighten them before re-assembling the valves & valve guides.

This stuff is takin forever but the critical stuff will be done hopefully in another month or month and a half.
 

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King Bearings are coming in tomorrow. 4 weeks lead time is kind of ridiculous but that is the new normal these days.

On the fence about grinding the bearing notches off or machining grooves into the engine block & main caps with a dremel. Probably decide when I get them. With a micrometer measuring the bearing thickness it's easy to check if there is a mistake grinding the notches down. More time and precision required but less mucking with the engine block.

Otherwise, not spending too much time thinking about the Juke these days. When these parts arrive I should be able to finally assembly the rods, pistons, crank and get the short block buttoned up quickly. The cylinder head valve lash caps need ordering and I have some machining on a few of the Ford valve retainers to lighten them before re-assembling the valves & valve guides.

This stuff is takin forever but the critical stuff will be done hopefully in another month or month and a half.
Yeah last thing you need is the build taking longer because parts take longer to get. Haha
 

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Discussion Starter · #572 ·
Lol......it always seems that I'm waiting on parts. Like I don't order a part until I need it, then it takes a month or 2 months which just pushes everything out. It's all good though because I'm patient and doing things right takes longer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #573 ·
Got the King Bearings finally.

Tossed the micrometer on them and they are coming in around .079" thk which is about perfect vs. .0791" for the stock used bearings. Black coating is kind of interesting, some kind of nano coating. There are the locator notches which need to be ground/filed off as Nissan don't use them. The upper bearing is full grooved like stock. The lower bearing has a ramped grove for about 5-10* of rotation on each side to allow some oil to get onto the bearing face easier, stock lower bearing is completely flat with no grooves. Oil channel groove width is .117" wide vs. .077-.094" stock, so more oil flow in the groove. The King bearing width is 0.688" wide vs. 0.650" stock but the contact bearing surface is identical to stock due to the wider oil groove on the King bearing. This'll help the oil feed into the bearing surface easier. These are rated at something like +30% more load capacity than a stock bearing regardless. Only downside is the oil feed hole is more of a 0.106 x 0.375 slot vs. the 0.175" diameter hole on the stock bearing. This is because the Mitsubishi EVO X engine block main oil feed is more of a hole with a long slot groove machined into the block. For the Nissan it's just a large diameter hole.

If you can visualize that even though the oil feed hole is smaller than stock, the entire oil channel feeding the bearing is much wider. It's possible I could open the feed slot to about 0.125" to 0.150" dia. and actually still have more oil flow to the bearings. I'll go ahead and hand ream the King Bearing oil feed just in case.

Anyway, it'll take me a good couple of days to modify these bearings to fit properly and properly dress them so there are no burrs. Little bit of work but this is typically how engine building goes I suppose. Sometimes you gotta custom fit stuff to make it work but in the long run it'll be worth it.

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They look cool. So the coating will mean better everything ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #575 ·
The black coating is basically the ceramic coating to improve wear resistance, although the black is the color but not the actual ceramic coating. Aftermarket bearings are strong but wear out quickly which for daily drivers is no bueno. These with the ceramic coating are about equivalent life/mileage of a stock aluminum oxide OEM bearing, but much higher load capacity.

I attached the King Bearing tech sheet explaining the many features of this bearing design. I think the stock bearings are good for 10,000 psi load capacity, these are like 17,000 psi rated.

You can see I already added a hole in the center of the slot to maintain the stock oil flow/pressure requirements. This is like the King Bearing "elliptix" feature on other vehicle applications of this bearing but I added it to maintain the stock Nissan 0.175" oil feed diameter. I used the stock bearing hole location to measure off the new hole on the King Bearing, then opened it with a small round hand file. Then carefully deburred the backside with a pocket knife as to not interfere with the bearing crush. Finally I'll sonic clean the bearing to get any remaining debri off. Still need to knock the locator tab down, otherwise this is what the final bearing will look like.

Yep, overall a really nice bearing that needs a little bit of detail/custom work but worth the effort.

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How much do you have to knock off the locator tab ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #577 ·
I had to take off about .035". I taped the bearing with painters blue tape to protect everything, then just start filing it down. But I had to carefully use a micrometer to keep measuring the bearing thickness as it should be dead even with the rest of the bearing surface. You don't want to take too much off around the tab because the backside transfers some heat to the engine block, but it's not too difficult. If it's even .0005" too tall, it'll contact the crankshaft and probably spin the bearing. I would probably recommend to most people to simply notch the block/main caps with a dremel grinding wheel as that would be mindlessly easy. I always installing the bearings with the main cap & bolts without the crankshaft and re-measuring the bore just in case because there is only one shot at it.

The bearings are worth the extra effort even if I don't push the car anywhere it's limit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #578 · (Edited)
King Bearings are fully modified.

You can see the oil feed slots have been modified with a larger 0.200" diameter central hole to mimic the stock bearing. I consider this mod overkill as the existing wide bearing slots would mate perfectly with the much larger engine block feed holes anyway, making the larger bearing hole an unnecessary step. The locator notches have been very carefully filed off and checked using a micrometer to make certain the bearing thickness is consistent with the rest of the bearing. I got the thickness within +/-0.0001" of the bearing thickness so being accurate is critical. Having a simple 1" micrometer allowed me to periodically check the thickness and compare, so in reality it just takes a little more time when measuring but much safer. For reference the notches are about .035" tall. A belt/wheel sander would also have worked well and probably a lot faster. For guys who are willing to rebuild a motor I consider this bearing modification worth the extra effort. You will be grinding piston rings and modifying the main gridle anyway, so this isn't much more work regardless.

These MB5722XPC.026 bearings as I've mentioned before are nearly identical in thickness to the OE Nissan bearings I took out of my 2012 engine, which were marked as a Grade 0 but actually closer now to the current Grade 4 or 5 Nissan bearings that seem to be a perfect fit for a stock/rebuild Juke. Keep in mind these are the ceramic coated +.026mm versions of the EVO X bearing, which are +.001" oversize and are non-standard but available thru King Bearing (MB5722XP.026). The standard MB5722 bearings will be un-coated and closer to a current Grade = 0 Nissan Bearing which may or may not work for your application.

Probably took me a solid 15 hours over a week to modify the bearings to fit the Juke. I might ask King Bearing to simply eliminate the notch and they would be a perfect fit for our Jukes. Even with the 4 week lead time and modification, still faster than waiting on Nissan's 2-3 month lead time from Japan for non-standard bearings.

In the pics you can see the chamfered oil feed hole is a gold color, that is the copper layer of the bearing. This chamfer is critical to avoid scratching the crankshaft but also helps get the oil up and out of the hole into the crankshaft journal. I didn't mention but I also had to chamfer the backside of the bearing, any burrs here will lift the bearing up which'll cause the crankshaft and bearing to contact....no bueno. One of the bearings has some slight marking/discoloration that came that way out of the box, purely cosmetic and doesn't affect anything.

The black coating on the inside of the bearing is partly a nano-coating and then a hard ceramic below that about equal to the hardness of the stock bearing aluminum oxide which is extremely durable and designed for high mileage applications. Interesting to note that the backside of these bearings have some type of black oxide coating and are a lot grippier than the stock bearing, better at preventing them from spinning I'd guess. But the black ceramic inside coating is very slippery but not smooth, like little tiny microscopic dimples. Hard to describe but the surface finish would hold oil better while also letting things slide over it much easier. These bearings are highly engineered.

Will my modest build need these bearings.....heck no? These were bought because they came in the perfect thickness I needed without having to wait months from Nissan.
Stock bearings are proven and would have been perfectly fine. Someone running 400-450 h.p. then I would definitely say an upgrade would be in order as these bearings are physically wider, have better oil feed into the lower bearing shell for more load capacity, etc. They were designed for the big horsepower EVO X builds so they will take absolutely anything a Juke can throw at it by a huge factor.

Anyway, I need to remeasure a few things with the micrometer then toss them into the ultrasonic cleaner and I'm done with the main bearings.

Next up will be finishing the modification of the main crankshaft bearing girdle to clearance the rods which should take a 1-2 days and then re-assembling the pistons to drop into the block over the next couple of weeks then the short block should be wrapping up nicely. It's coming along slowly but surely.

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How will the elongated oil slots work with the oem oil passage ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #580 ·
How will the elongated oil slots work with the oem oil passage ?
Good question. The pictures below will demonstrate.

The hole in the OE bearing is about 0.196" in diameter. King Bearing slot is about 0.130" x .396". But the block oil feed hole is about 0.300" in diameter though I will measure it later but it's enormous as the picture shows. Thus it almost completely fills the slot anyway plus some. The King Bearing slot is centered on this feed hole but the C/L angles are slightly off since we are talking different engine applications, but it's close enough that it wouldn't matter much. This is why my hand machined hole in the pictures looks like the hole is off-center of the slot.....this is by design to line up perfectly with the factory oil hole location which I measured off the OE bearing.

The EVO X block is different, there is a deep feed hole in the block followed by another oil groove also machined in the block that sits under most of the bearing like a gutter drain, thus the slots in the bearing get fed from (2) spots and not the (1) in the Juke. These King Bearings kind of improve the Juke main oil feed with deeper/wider oil grooves and a nice oil feed transition into the lower main cap bearing which can be seen as these mini "ramps" on the solid/full face bearings.

I was checking the bearings this afternoon on the engine block and they will just fit nicely on the crankshaft as if they were designed for them but not much room to spare on the journal. The end bearings (#1 and # 5) will sit a little bit inboard/offcenter on Mains #1 & #5 so they don't overhang the crank journal, but Mains #2, #3, #4 the bearings will sit dead center on the caps if that makes sense. This is where I use the calipers to make sure everything is centered and sitting correctly otherwise the bearing overhangs the crankshaft journal and that's not desirable as the crankshaft can dig into the bearing that way. Little tweaks like that but no big deal.

I'll snap pictures later of what I'm talking about when I reinstall them. Otherwise they fit quite nicely



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