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Discussion Starter · #541 ·
Lol, that's true.

I'm going thru the engine block now and analyzing the oil galley passages. There are about 5-6 plastic hole plug sizes I need to purchase for all ports required for the vapor blast cleaning process. The main oil galley is about 18" long which feeds the mains, timing chain, etc. Also ordering up some different dia. nylon rifle brushes which work really good to clear any difficult debri out. There are (2) factory oil galley plugs that when removed allow almost every passage to be cleaned with a rifled brush by physically pushing it thru to the other side. The way the galleys work is if you first remove all the plugs you can start cleaning by pushing from an open branch first, then follow back to the main galley and clean that last. Sort of like sweeping a garage floor from one corner and pushing it out the door. Overall it looks pretty clean since I used good synthetic engine oil, but there is a little bit of debri here and there. When the glass starts flying things will change so all these galleys being plugged shut will make the final cleanup a lot safer/easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #542 ·
My block is bolted to the engine stand waiting at this point for me to start building it, I'll post some pics of that mid-week after the block is clearanced for the ARP rod bolts and the rings are gapped.

Engine/Compressor mapping:
Here are some numbers I'm crunching for the engine tune while I'm bored. I enter the boost pressure, then it calculates airflow (cfm), horsepower, torque, etc. I used Desktop Dyno 2000 and input my engine bore, crankshaft stroke, camshaft profile, intake/exhaust valve dia, engine compression, boost level, cylinder head flow, etc. What it gives me back is a VE value (Volumetric efficiency) and horsepower (not shown here). This is important value for how the engine breathes for any particular engine setup (i.e. cams turbo, exhaust, etc.). With those values I now have a full theoretical engine map of the airflow. Then I put that V.E. value back into my spreadsheet calculator which now mimics the Desktop Dyno software. The boost pressures, intake air temps, and rpms can now be altered to design my engine tune and boost tuning. My Juke has been on a dyno @ P&L Motorsports but with all the new mods the data is fairly useless now.

Below you can see the engine power/torque mapped. The red dashed line is the CVT pushbelt limit before belt slippage of around 285 lb-ft (@crank). The green dashed line is the Bosch recommended max CVT pushbelt rating of 257 lb-ft (@crank) for reliability. I've mapped the boost to slowly ramp up to that belt reliability limit. The idea here is to limit engine torque to about 257 lb-ft at peak power but bring it in smoothly while still having some nice torque in the low/midrange. Then the curve tapers back at high rpms just a bit to keep the belt happy. The max power is now close to 342 h.p. (crank) @ 7250 rpms while still keeping the torque at 257 lb-ft when I need it for racing or whatever. The airflow is about 34.3 lb/min which is easily achievable with the Mamba 19T/TD04HL @ 20 psi (2.36 PR or bar). The MHI 19T compressor map is shown below (34.2 lb/min = .235 m^3/s conversion). The turbo compressor efficiency at that flow rate is about 67% (see the 19T compressor map) give or take which isn't too bad for a small bolt-on turbo. You can see the turbo will now operate comfortably between 63% and 76% efficiency everywhere in the rpm range without surging or choking. Keep in mind this compressor map is the older MHI 19T cast wheel. The newer Mamba billet 19T extended tip is about 5% higher in flow as an estimate with about equal efficiencies if not better. This is a well matched turbo for my 1.6L tune although the turbine housing is a little bit restrictive, it'll still get the job done nicely for my modest goals.

I threw in some turbine work calculations to show horsepower lost with different compressor efficiencies.

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Discussion Starter · #543 · (Edited)
Finally got around to doing a deep internal block cleaning. Previously I had vapor blasted and pressure blasted the engine block. Visually it looked clean. In reality there was quite a bit of glass bead left over in the cylinder head bolt holes.....not good but I was expecting it. If I were to do it over I would have also put plastic plugs in the head bolt holes, would have made the job easier.

Purchased 4-5 different sized nylon rifle brushes to clean all the bolt holes & old galleys out. You can see the 3" cylinder bore nylon brush, I didn't bother using it as the wooden handheld one worked plenty good. Had to get a scrubbing brush and hot soapy water to get the cylinder bores immaculate as there was glass bead and grinding grit in the honed bore surface finish as well. I read a pretty good engine building article and they recommended against just using solvent & rag, just doesn't work. Good old nylon brush and hot soapy water cleans everything & then finished off with air blast at 60 psi and some WD40 for now to protect the bores.

I bought a thread chaser set. I tried (1) bolt hole on the side of the block and it started cutting threads which isn't good. So I decided this isn't worth it and the threaded holes are in immaculate condition anyway. In the future I'll make my own by putting a notch cut in a standard bolt which will grab any debri in the hole.

Up next: I'll be ultrasonic cleaning the oil squirters and reinstalling them along with the oil galley plugs torqued to spec. Probably tomorrow I'll load up the main bearings & bolts and crushing them down to get accurate main bearing I.D. with the bore mic. Then I'll be gapping the piston rings now that the bores are cleaned up. This is necessary because I have to loadup the rods/pistons just to check the rod/block clearance for notching the block to clear the aftermarket ARP rods bolts. Going to be a lot of assembly and re-assembly but it should go quickly.

In case any one wonders, I'm going by the Factory Service Manual on this build. I can't reprint the manual for this build to due copy right issues. But I've also got an engine rebuild checklist with cleaning, torque, lube specs, o-ring install, etc. It'll also reference the manual pg # and step to check off the list as completed. Bolts as always will be painted and marked once they are torqued down to spec.

The build should start picking up at this point, I have almost everything I need except the engine mounts and cam phasers which I'll order a bit later.


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Discussion Starter · #544 · (Edited)
The oil squirters were ultra-sonically cleaned,rinsed, and installed. They have a check valve inside and open above a certain oil pressure. I didn't pressurize them to confirm but I'm sure they work. Used blue loctite and 20 lb-ft torque to secure them down just in case. They were painted with an inspection marker as well. Typically wouldn't use loctite inside the engine but here the torque spec wasn't available so a little bit extra precaution doesn't hurt. Anything else will be torqued with engine oil to factory specs.

Saga continues.

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Discussion Starter · #545 ·
About to grind the top/middle piston rings. I've calculated a .018" top ring gap and .022" middle ring gap per Carillo specs. I really wish I had Auto Machine do the cylinder bore/hone now. I re-read the Carrillo piston specs and boy do they hold things tight. Roundness to within .0002" and Surface finish of Ra = 15-35 micro in. with a 35-40 degree crosshatch. Piston wall clearance of .0037" which isn't tight because it's forged. And they recommended, almost made it mandatory to machine with a torque plate, which I didn't have available.

So, the cylinder roundness I'm still good & within .0002" variance but #3 and #4 the piston-to-wall clearance is creeping up to about .0049", not so good. I think I'm gonna get some piston slap on those cylinders but at this point I can't do anything about it. It should break-in fine without too much oil burn as the roundness is more important and I'm good there. I'll do my best to get the best break-in and ring seat. The Nissan bore taper spec is .0004" and I'm sitting at .0004", .0004", .0006", .0006" variance from top to bottom within the bore. Little bit out on #3 & #4 but again not much I can do. This might produce some ring flutter but again for a street car not big problem, for a race car maybe a few ponies might get lost. Oddly enough these numbers AFTER machining are very similar to the BEFORE machining results, just with the larger bore size for the bigger pistons.

Again, this is where street engine build and race engine build differ. I found the right machine shop, just a bit too late for this build. When I ever build a pure race engine it'll be done with a torque plate and Auto Machine, Inc. will do the machine work. For my STi I'll have AIG doing the block as those guys do NASA level of block prep work for the EJ255. We are talking full CNC, liquid Nitrogen, torque plates, etc.

Is what it is but I expected it the minute I measured the block machine work. Good enough will have to suffice.

Pics to follow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #546 · (Edited)
Some pics of the piston gapping process.

I've shown a picture of the Carrillo specs for piston ring gaps and also the engine boring specs for the pistons. I didn't give the engine machine shop the specs on the piston ring & bore surface finish, wish I had but should be good enough, that's my fault. I put together an engine rebuild checklist in excel, mostly random tasks needed in addition to the service manual. I'm still screwing around with some of the steps so some of it's thrown out of sequence but that'll get corrected. I might highlight the service manual points to show them completed as I walk thru them along with the step # and page. This would then guarantee after every step that I've completed the critical points, without having to worry about it. When building an engine over a long period of time this really helps to make certain steps were completely. I'm using inspection paint as well to mark parts where I can, similar to the factory.

The piston ring gap clearance depends on the actual machined bore, for every +.001" beyond 3.1692" bore I.D., the ring gap increases by .00314". The base formula for a turbocharged engine is "Piston Bore x .0055" = ring gap, in addition to the adder I mentioned previously. My spreadsheet takes the average of about (6) measurements per bore as the diagram in my spreadsheet shows, then I calculate the correct piston ring gap from that. In this case, Piston ring #1 would have about a .0189" top ring piston gap. The picture I have has the ring gap ground to about .0170" so I have some left to go. For Piston Ring # 3 using the Carrillo formula I will have to increase the ring gap to .0207" top ring gap because the machine shop over-bored the bore a little too much on average. So a spreadsheet really helps with tracking what's going on and where to make the adjustments.

To summarize: Piston ring gap of .015" minimum is needed to prevent the ring ends from butting under high temperatures. Without this gap the rings would warp and engine compression would be lost. Turbo cars require more ring gap due to higher effective compression and heat. I follow the Carrillo specs to the letter on this

I'm using a cheap ring grinder and it's a fiber reinforced wheel which is pretty lumpy and takes forever to grind the hardened rings. It probably took about 150 rotations to get .005" gap increase on the rings with the hardened top piston rings, but this is dependant on how much pressure is applied, moderate pressure is recommended. I take about 10-20 rotations of the grinding wheel, then test fit and measure with a feeler gauge. The oil control ring is much softer so the material removal is much quicker. A diamond coated wheel would be faster and also more precise and they are also available. Additionally, there is some technique to grinding the gap "square" as it's easy to screw this up, so grinding a little bit at a time this can be corrected to get a nice square ring gap. When the gap is finally set correctly the edges are deburred to prevent from scratching the bores. The rings then get cleaned in the ultrasonic cleaner to remove the grinding wheel dust. Also the cylinder bores then need another round of cleaning to remove the grinding dust as it's impossible to avoid with the gapping process. I used non-Synthetic engine oil to lube the piston bore for gapping the rings. Tilting the ring upwards then lowering it into the bore works the best. The piston is then used to square up the rings otherwise the gap measurements get skewed. Takes a bit of practice to get repeatable results. Good technique also minimizes scratching the bore with the rings but it happens, no big deal.

Once I finish up all (8) piston rings getting gapped correctly I'll show the rings being loaded onto the pistons and the process of "clocking" the rings in relation to each other to stagger the gaps before install. Also, the rings must be orientated with the laser etched P/N facing upwards to get the top piston ring and oil scraper ring geometry correct as this is super critical. Pistons will then be numbered for each specific cylinder bore and an arrow showing direction towards the front of the vehicle for the DI injection/squish pocket. After the pistons are loaded then a piston-to-deck measurement will be made. Because I have after market rods & pistons, plus material removed from the cylinder block deck & cylinder head deck, & a valve job performed, eveyrthing is sitting in different positions. A deck drop gauge will be used here to measure the TDC position of the piston in relation to the deck. And finally I'll need to check the piston-to-valve clearance using engine clay.

Lot's of stuff to go thru coming up a bit later.

Here's a great video by Mahle for gapping rings and how to do it right.


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Discussion Starter · #547 ·
Found this article a couple months back and found it interesting.


Looks like the Nissan VQ37VHR motor (370Z) uses the same size head bolt size as the Juke. The Juke head bolt size is M11 x 1.25m x 126.5mm length. In this case MotoIQ are actually using Juke head bolts as upgrades on their build so the lengths are probably bang on too, the article explains why. Well Motoiq prefer the Juke torque to yield head bolts for their 370Z motor upgrades due to minimizing head/bore distortion.

What this means is ARP already offer a head stud kit that has a very high probability of fitting a Nissan Juke, #202-4701 head stud kit for the VQ35/37.
I'll put some on order and let you guys know how they fit. This should round out my engine upgrades quite nicely as I'll have all the bases covered at that point. Always nice to have some additional options.

Found it here for $240:

 
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Discussion Starter · #548 · (Edited)
Figured I'd update a bit.

Got around to ultrasonically cleaning the crankshaft. Worked out great, fits perfectly in the basket. I previously cleaned it with acetone and brake cleaner to get rid of the 400 grit sandpaper and polishing compound. As I mentioned before, I had re-polished the main & rod journals myself as they were needing a touchup. The factory micro-polish the crankshaft journal surfaces for low friction but they had gotten a little scratched up after 80,000 miles. I can state right now that Acetone and/or Brakecleaner are really poor for cleaning parts. The hot soaking at 130*F in the Simple Green industrial cleaner & DI water using ultrasonics is another level of clean. It comes out squeeky clean that solvents can't match. A little bit of spray rinse in the kitchen sink and then quick compressed air-blast prevented any flash rust or water spots. In the future I might get a 2nd ultrasonic cleaner for a clean DI water rinse/dunk but for now this works well. The stock factory crankshaft is forged out of a high nickel steel, probably a 4140 or chromoly and so it doesn't really rust anyway. As I mentioned, the machine shop wouldn't even touch it for re-balancing as they stated Nissan OE balancing is bang on.

Made a rooky mistake ordering main crankshaft bearings. I ordered P/N A2208-1KC0A which is the main crankshaft bearing-set. I didn't realize these are US-25 or essentially under-size bearings. These are only used when you are line honing the main bores due to some serious warpage or using high strength main bolts where a complete line hone is required. I had to re-order the correct PN 12207-1KC0A which are Grade=0 and identical to what came out of the engine block. There are some differences between main bearing requirements #1,#4,#5 and #2 & #3 which required different bearing Grades. But the factory installed Grade=0 on all 5 main bearings on my car so that is what I used.

Anyway, lesson learned here but I caught that when I installed the new bearings to re-measure the ID journal using the Mitutoyo bore mic. Another great reason to document all the engine measurements on an engine build-sheet so there is no chance of something slipping by.

I built up the 2J rods and Carrillo pistons and gapped the rings according to the Carrillo spec and those are waiting to drop in to the cylinder bore once the crankshaft is re-installed. I spent a lot of time deburring the gapped rings because my ring grinder chipped the ring edges a little bit. Using 400 grit sandpaper I got the filed ring edges cleaned up nicely, then dropped into the ultrasonic cleaner for complete decontamination. I'll probably buy a diamond wheel ring grinder for the future instead of the stone grinding disc style.

No major issues but the rings were a PITA to install onto the pistons. I used the ring installer tool but switched over to carefully spreading the rings by hand (NOT twisting them) as the ring installer was over-spreading the rings to my liking due to the design. I'm using a Moly-based engine lube for the bearings and for the rings I'm using Non-Synthetic engine oil to lube them up before install into the cylinder bores. The cylinder bores were plateau honed and the Carrillo piston rings are designed to seat quickly. I've heard of people using WD40 for lubricating the piston rings for break-in but I'm using Non-synthetic engine oil with high zinc content (i.e. break-in engine oil). I'm using a method from AMS to break-in the motor and it's nothing fancy, just a lot of common sense and it's a safe engine break-in method. The valve springs require a break-in method, and so do the camshafts as well, so that is added to my checklist.

The rod bearings are Nisssan RS bearings Grade=3/4 and Grade= 4 which are an upgrade over the non-RS Juke, pictures show the difference on the upper bearing shell which looks like beryllium copper or something similar as opposed to the aluminum material used on the lower bearing. These measured out perfectly with the oil clearances coming in at the higher side of around .0025", with the factory upper limit spec at .0028". For a race motor running 10W30 oil, this'll still work out well but something closer to .0020" would have been better. The Grade=4 bearings are the thickest bearing you can buy and these were purchased because the 2J Rods large end ID were coming in a little bit larger than stock rods. Additionally, the crankshaft journal re-polishing took off a few tenths so this pushes the oil clearances up a touch, no big deal. The 2J rod also does not have the upper oil relief/vent hole like the factory does, but I think this may not be a problem since the bearing clearances are now a little bit on the higher side around .0025" and I should have decent oil flow out the sides of the bearings. Going to be running synthetic 10W30 racing oil so this should work out nicely.

Pictures to follow as I'm concentrating now on just building the motor up. Hoping by Monday I'll have most of the entire short block assembled on the stand.
 
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Discussion Starter · #549 ·
For those attempting to run the stock connecting rods on a modded setup, you might want to read this: I measured my rod caps actually flexed and spread open. This increased the rod bearing oil clearance significantly to nearly .0029" (spec range .0015-.0019, limit .0029") even though there wasn't any actual bearing wear I could see. Bad things start happening once oil bearing clearances get near .0035". I was maybe running 260 h.p. (crank). Keep that in mind if you are trying to run high rpms or high torque/acceleration on a stock setup. I would not trust the stock connecting rods or rod bolts on anything above 300 h.p. Same goes for the stock pistons. The stock piston ring gaps are extremely small, running high boost and abuse can overheat the rings/piston and shatter the stock pistons even though they are actually a heavy duty design.

I think +350 w.h.p. on a stock Juke engine is suicide.
 

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Yay! An update!

Itching to see the photos. I still laugh and can’t get over the fact you’re doing this in the kitchen.

so I won’t pretend to know everything you said, but one thing you mentioned was the 2J rods not having the oil relief hole like stock. Can you post a photo and maybe explain why that hole is there on the stock ones or what it does?
 

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Discussion Starter · #551 · (Edited)
I will load all the pics over the weekend, going to be plenty.

Lol.....kitchen it the best place. I'm now kind of doing it in my living room and garage....hahahaha. With my new house, my girlfriend has banned all car parts.

Factory rod bearing oil "vent" hole is to allow oil to flow from the crankshaft oil feed hole out the top of the rod or something like this. So the crankshaft has a large diameter in the journal pin, then an internal hole feeding oil, then the rod bearing, then this vent hole out the top of the rod. The factory have tight bearing clearances, so for total oil flow to remain high, they need an exit hole for oil to flow. Aftermarket don't use this "exit hole" in the rod because it seriously weakens the rod. I've heard it's not necessary, and the slightly larger bearing clearances I have now allow oil to fall out the side of the bearing which achieves the same thing. I was worried about this at first, but almost no aftermarket rods use this feature. The 2J rod DOES still have an oil hole on the piston pin journal to lubricate the piston pin, but the oiling requirements aren't as great.

The pics will make this clear, I'll put the stock rod/piston against the 2J/Carrillo for comparison. It really is a very nice upgrade and I'm glad I'm doing it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #552 ·
Here are some comparison pics of the stock vs. 2J pistons/rods.

You can see the RS bearings are clearly different as I described. The upper bearing shell is beryllium copper and I read somewhere it can carry more load capacity, the lower is the same as the non-RS. They aren't any wider or thicker, just different material. The stock rod bolts are ridiculously small at M8x1.0, while the ARP rod bolts are M10x1.0. These ARP rod bolts are about $120 but are included in the 2J rod kit which is great.

The 2J rods are heavy duty forged 4340 chromoly steel. The rod cap is heavily reinforced with ribs and much thicker as well. Entire rod is shot peened and the big end has nice buttress support. This is an I-beam design which guys prefer over the H-beam design for heavy duty turbo applications. Total weight is about 980g vs. 880g (2J vs stock). Normally this extra weight would hurt the ability for the motor to rev quickly, but the compression is bumped up from 9.5:1 to 10:1 to offset that. The tradeoff is well worth it.

The Carrillo pistons are also heavier duty forged aluminum, nothing ground breaking here. They aren't teflon coated like the factory pistons but for this application I think they'll be fine. Carrillo will coat them upon request but I didn't think it's a big deal and I didn't feel like sending them out. Like I already mentioned, the stock rod oil relief hole is missing on the 2J but I don't think it's super critical to have it.

There you have it, some comparisons of stock vs. upgraded.

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Discussion Starter · #553 · (Edited)
OK, just received the factory Nissan 1KC0A bearings, these are Grade = 0, this being the thinnest bearings they sell at .07865" thk. So the bearing clearances on the mains are now sitting at about .0030", .0029", .0024", .0027", .0025" with everything assembled. The spec limit is about .0026" from Nissan. Partly because I re-polished the crankshaft, and partly because the factory 1KC0A Grade=0 bearings I just bought are actually smaller than what I was expecting. You cannot really trust what anything is marked or stamped as, you have to physically measure everything with a dial bore indicator and micrometer to know exactly what you have. All Nissan bearings from Grades 1 thru 7 are on national backorder. I would probably need a Grade 5 thru 7 to correct the main clearances to something more like .0018" across the board. That is Option 1 to put in an order and wait 2 months.

Option 2:
I found King Bearings have for the Nissan MR18DE a bearing set that measures almost identical to the factory crankshaft and main bores, which is P/N M5781SI. All dimensions are what the MR16DDT require and this bearing would be considered a Grade = 2/3 which is a mix of Grade 2 and Grade 3, bearing thickness of about 0.079". This would tighten up the clearance by about -.0005" which would bring all the mains back within the factory Nissan spec limit.


I'll be ordering the King Bearings M5781SI from here:


And the Clevite Bearings MS2301A from here:


Other subject is the machining of the engine for the 2J forged connecting rods. 2J had mentioned the engine block would need machining or clearancing, this was incorrect. The main cap aluminum girdle needs to be notched to clear the ARP rod bolt cap as it's currently hitting it on the downstroke. 2J really need to put this information on their website or a tip sheet in the packaging of the rods. I'll take some pics of how this is done but it's fairly straight forward with a sanding drum or carbide burr.

Saga continues.
 

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What would happen if you used grade 0 in the build ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #555 · (Edited)
What would happen if you used grade 0 in the build ?
On my engine, maybe there would be more noise on engine startup. I'm over spec on 2 main journals, the other 3 are on the limit. Tighter bearing clearance keeps the oil film more stable and it'll carry the load better, while keeping the oil pressure up. Clevite/Mahle recommend using the formula 0.7 to 1.0 x Main Journal Dia/1000 for clearance in inches. So for 2.064" main journals that would be a clearance of .0014" to .0021". This would be a perfect range for a blueprinted engine. The Nissan factory manual is extremely confusing but there is a sizing "chart matrix" which is actually technically correct, tells you which grade # to use. But the numeric specs section is 100% wrong which states for #1,#4, & #5 to use .009-.0013" and #2/#3 is .0005-.0009". This is much too tight

Tighter clearance for running thinner oils, larger clearance for running thicker oils. I can almost correct this with a 10w40 oil since my connecting rod clearances are also in the .0026" range so all bearings are generally running on the larger clearance side of things. I'm running the Grade = 4 on the conn rods but I waited 2 months on backorder for those bearings cause I knew I needed them. Had I not purchased them, the conn rods would be running at nearly .0035" clearance and this would have caused a spun bearing as this is way too much clearance. On the mains I'm borderline but with the King bearings I have on order I'll get it down to about .0020-.0025" clearance and this'll be closer to ideal.

Here's a great article that explains the idea behind bearing clearances:

 

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Discussion Starter · #556 · (Edited)
Just received the Clevite/Mahle bearings for the MR18E. Not gonna work.

Thickness is equal to a Grade 0 and overall size are identical as stock, so no different than using the existing Nissan bearings I have now. The oiling holes are tiny at around .100" vs. .172" stock, this would seriously block the main oil galley ports on the block. Bearings also have oil grooves on both the upper and lower shell, stock have a full bearing width on the lower with a oil groove on the upper shell. This is preferred for higher load capacity. Overall a high quality bearing but not for the MR16DDT turbocharged requirements. The King bearings should be a better match but I'll wait and see. The oiling holes if they are undersize it's not worth the effort to resize them but I'll see when I receive them.

The pictures below compare the Clevite bearings against my used bearings. The bearings get marked up from the dial bore indicator so those are the little scratch/scuff marks, otherwise the used bearings were in great shape.

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Discussion Starter · #557 ·
So, got to talking with King Bearings.

Looks like nothing for the Juke MR16DDT is available. Well, deciding not to give up we matched up the engine block main cap dia. and the crankshaft journal pin dia. Looks like the EVO X 4B11T is an identical match for both dimensions on the Nissan MR16DDT, no idea how that is possible but it is. The only deviation are that the EVO X bearings are 18 mm wide vs. 16.6mm for the MR16DDT and the oiling holes are large slots instead of 4.5mm holes so that also works great. But there is plenty room to fit them on the Juke engine block as the crankshaft journal pins are much wider than the stock bearing widths and everything still fits neatly within the main bearing caps even being 1.4mm wider. This'll be a +8% load capacity improvement based on the width increase. Also, these EVO bearings are a King tri-metal XP compound which is both durable for the street and for mega horsepower applications and are typically +24% higher load bearing than a standard OEM bi-metal bearing. The only fitment issues are the locating tabs which need to be carefully ground/sanded off flush since the Juke doesn't use locators for the bearings. This operation is critical to get this notch below the surface to avoid pinching the crankshaft. Cost is about $110 per set. I found them in a +.001" size which means they are .0791" thick or a Grade 3/4 equivalent to the Nissan bearings which will bring the main bearings into nearly perfect spec, though STD size is available which is equal to the Grade 0 as well. This'll now bring most of my bearing clearances to within .0014" thru .0020" which is spot on for this motor. They look like the set below with a special black wear coating. The critical thing here is that the lower bearing is mostly smooth with some small oil grooves, while the upper bearing is the standard 180 deg oil groove and large oil feed slots.

If they work out great it might be worth having King Bearing simply remove the notching/tab operation and make them available for the MR16DDT application instead. I'll post some pics once I receive the bearings and do a test fitup. Should be a nice un-expected main bearing upgrade to go along with my RS rod bearing upgrade.

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So, got to talking with King Bearings.

Looks like nothing for the Juke MR16DDT is available. Well, deciding not to give up we matched up the engine block main cap dia. and the crankshaft journal pin dia. Looks like the EVO X 4B11T is an identical match for both dimensions on the Nissan MR16DDT, no idea how that is possible but it is. The only deviation are that the EVO X bearings are 18 mm wide vs. 16.6mm for the MR16DDT and the oiling holes are large slots instead of 4.5mm holes so that also works great. But there is plenty room to fit them on the Juke engine block as the crankshaft journal pins are much wider than the stock bearing widths and everything still fits neatly within the main bearing caps even being 1.4mm wider. This'll be a +8% load capacity improvement based on the width increase. Also, these EVO bearings are a King tri-metal XP compound which is both durable for the street and for mega horsepower applications and are typically +24% higher load bearing than a standard OEM bi-metal bearing. The only fitment issues are the locating tabs which need to be carefully ground/sanded off flush since the Juke doesn't use locators for the bearings. This operation is critical to get this notch below the surface to avoid pinching the crankshaft. Cost is about $110 per set. I found them in a +.001" size which means they are .0791" thick or a Grade 3/4 equivalent to the Nissan bearings which will bring the main bearings into nearly perfect spec, though STD size is available which is equal to the Grade 0 as well. This'll now bring most of my bearing clearances to within .0014" thru .0020" which is spot on for this motor. They look like the set below with a special black wear coating. The critical thing here is that the lower bearing is mostly smooth with some small oil grooves, while the upper bearing is the standard 180 deg oil groove and large oil feed slots.

If they work out great it might be worth having King Bearing simply remove the notching/tab operation and make them available for the MR16DDT application instead. I'll post some pics once I receive the bearings and do a test fitup. Should be a nice un-expected main bearing upgrade to go along with my RS rod bearing upgrade.

View attachment 190310
Can you post some pics of the OEM vs King.

Thats a great find if they do indeed work better than OEM.
 

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Discussion Starter · #559 ·
For a higher horsepower build I think they'll work out nicely. Seems to be a popular upgrade for the EVO X guys. Once it ships I'll take pics side-by-side to compare them.

I might end up just notching the block & main caps with a dremel grinding disc to fit them up properly, still debating which way to go. I'll also take pics of the main cap girdle modification I did to clearance the 2J connecting rods. Too bad 2J couldn't just sell a machined girdle to go along with the rods, would make the engine rebuild a straight drop-in upgrade.

Once I'm done with the engine project I'll have to gather up all the part numbers and suppliers and the modifications I did in a short list for anyone who wants to build their own motor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #560 · (Edited)
Whilst I'm waiting on parts, had some fun with the EVO X.

Seems my rewire on my damaged harness shorted the ECM. I used the butt splice connectors but they cut thru and shorted the harnesses. I'll be using a bare wire splice technique with solder to repair/reconstruct the harness again with some heat shrink. Fried the coil driver (i.e. power transistor) on the ECM for the exhaust camshaft oil solenoid. Getting an annoying P0013 code. Drives fine, but no exhaust cam phase operation, so it's running lean at idle as well. Scored a 2015 EVO X ECM used for reasonable money. Now I have to buy the Mitsubishi MUT-III to reprogram the used ECM with the new VIN so the immobilizer will recognize it. Plus I then have to reflash with my current ECMFlash tune onto the used ECM as well to get my tune back. It's a huge pain in the rear but at least now I can reprogram the TPS sensors any time I want without having to hit the dealership.

All of this because of my neighborhood squirrel chewed thru the wiring harness.
 
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