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Discussion Starter #1
Figured I'd start a new thread for my pending engine rebuild.

Backstory:


My mighty Juke AWD went down back in September 2018 due to age and modding and the end result was a wasted CVT transmission. You guys might have followed my CVT thread over the last 8 months. It probably was a 2 month build w/6 months of sitting around thinking, redesigning, getting quotes from machine shops, etc. On a difficulty scale of 1 to 10, it was a solid 10. Few parts were readily available to order. I modified and custom upgraded the transmission where there weren't parts available. Well, having 80,000 miles on the engine doesn't make sense to slap a nearly brand new CVT rebuild on it.

Goal:

Now many are thinking: Why a built motor on a CVT? I mean, the OE CVT at most can hold 260-280 lb-ft before having some serious reliability problems long term. I've owned my Juke AWD CVT since 2012 and I'm aware of the limits of the CVT. It's sobering how limited the CVT is BUT it's not unlike the EVOX 5 spd vs. 6spd DSG debate. Those DSG owners embraced the torque limitations and what the benefits of having a rapid shifting automatic offered. The CVT isn't that different when you think about it. The advantage of having a nice torque vectoring AWD automatic is hard to give up. For what I do and how I drive, I like me a nice modded AWD automatic. My other toys are a modded 2015 EVO X Final Edition and 2005 WRX STi waiting on a rebuilt engine. Nothing new I'm interested that is as quick and still has the hatchback/CUV form factor without costing a mint. I've looked at the Kona 2.0L w/DSG, probably the closest thing out there I like.

A built motor might appear completely overkill. But if you think about it, the cost to upgrade the motor vs. a standard rebuild/refurb is only about $1500 more. I'm 80k miles into my original engine, making the rebuild choice a tough one. The existing engine block, oil pan upper case, crankshaft, cylinder head all can easily be refurbished for a rebuild without any issue. A bare engine was going to run me about $4850 w/core exchange + $250 shipping. A shortblock maybe $2100, though also needing another $1500 in OE parts to make it reliable. The rebuilt stock engine with FULL upgrades (NOT bolt-on parts) is running around $3500 in parts at this point, with machine shop labor ~$4,500. The bolt-on parts will probably add another $3k-$4k as well. I already have the 19T turbo upgrade, Injen 3" catback, and ECUTek software I'm not counting since I bought those 6 years ago.

Couple points: I'll be running the RS rod bearings and stock main bearings. I was going to try the ACL bearings (5M2905H-STD) but 2J seem to have good luck with the OE mains. They recommended the RS Oil pump and I'm going with that with a Setrab external engine oil cooler. The Cometic head gasket is probably overkill but it's another 2J recommend. To allow enough airflow thru the front FMIC core, I'm switching to the RS front bumper cover and possibly the RS rear hatch spoiler to balance things out cosmetically. My boost controller will be electronic since I hate the programmed boost curves on the ECUTek reflashes......old school but it works.

Power goals are simple: 300 h.p./265 lb-ft @ crank. Maybe 280 h.p./257 lb-ft for daily driving.

Parts List:

The parts to support this are a LONG list which partially is listed below.


- Cometic Head Gasket
- 2J Forged pistons
- 2J Forged connecting rods
- RS rod bearings
- OE main bearings
- OE head bolts
- OE main bolts
- RS oil pump
- Water pump
- Honed/Hot Tanked Engine Block (decked)
- Rebuilt Head (Multiangle valve job, new guides & seals, decked)
- 2J Racing 255LPH in-tank fuel pump
- OE high pressure fuel pump
- Flowed/balanced Fuel injectors
- ECUTek retuning (MAF scaling/fuel trims, higher pump pressures, etc.)
- Exhaust manifold (light port work, Swain white lightning coated)
- Mambatek 19T turbo upgrade
- Mambatek upgraded wastegate actuator
- Mambatek TD04L 9 blade turbine wheel retrofit
- GTM 2.5" S.S. downpipe
- Fast Religion 2.5" testpipe w/flex (Swain white lightning coated)
- Injen 3" catback
- 2J Racing FMIC w/crash bar
- Injen Upper I.C. pipes (red wrinkle coated)
- Synapse Diverter Valve
- Injen 3" CAI
- Injen turbo inlet pipe
- Mambatek 2.5" compressor inlet
- RS front bumper cover
- Upgraded CVT (my rebuild/upgrade)
- Setrab CVT cooler with fanpack
- Setrab Engine Oil cooler
 

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This is getting so epic you're gonna be bought out by Disney and franchised by year's end.

I would say that's NASA level stuff, but Disney has way more cash.
 

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This is getting so epic you're gonna be bought out by Disney and franchised by year's end.

I would say that's NASA level stuff, but Disney has way more cash.
Elon Musk might have something to say.

WOW btw. Amazing.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Mac, it’s not too bad really. About $5900 for all engine internal mods and bolt-in’s but my final list probably pushes that to $8k. The CVT I already spent about $3500. That was mostly R&D on a used transmission. All this doesn’t include wheel,suspension,braking mods either. I can get by and upgrade that later as needed.

A lot of this post is mainly amping myself up to gut out the full build without compromises. The CVT was Phase 1. I thru everything I knew at building and upgrading the CVT, at some point I said I just need to get it built and run it.

This build you guys might notice I’m planning to use a lot of the off-shelf parts. I have a TIG welder (need some training though) and all the equipment to do custom exhausts and intercoolers, etc. I have access to machine shops and the ability to design what I need. The reality is I just don’t have time for fabrication and I doubt I could do it much cheaper than the vendors.

The time I do have is spent integrating the system of parts and also putting every bit of effort into the engine build and restoration. If I get time I might do a nice high flowing custom 3.5” CAI but I’d like to spend time making it look good and retuning for it.

The end date to complete the build is November this year, right before the snow hits.

The goal was to get the Juke about as fast as a new stock WRX STi, but with better reliability. The Juke is more than 300 lbs lighter. To that end I needed to change my philisophy and balance out the build. Basically upgrading everything a little bit.
 

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Elon musk was just a comment about the other comment not your build $$$. Just making a joke.. Sorry for rhe confusion.

Epic build tho. Might want to consider those cams.

Sent from my LM-G710 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Mac,

I knew you were joking, no worries.


Parts ordering:

My pistons/rods and FMIC/fuel pump are coming in a couple of days.

I've based my build on the vendor's. 2J will get ordered everything in 1-2 orders. Mambatek will supply my upgraded turbine wheel, oil/water line feeds, etc. Then Nissanpartsdeal.com for all OEM internal engine parts. That's (3-4) orders broken up over (3) months to spread things out. That'll cover about 95% of my parts orders with.

Couple things I learned is that Nissanpartsdeal.com are about 20% cheaper than any of the online Nissan dealers. This is making my build ALOT more economically feasible. Secondly, I've decided I'm using OEM Nissan for everything. Too much risk buying China made parts from RockAuto.

Also, I've been talking to Joe at 2J and I'm really liking the customer service. He answers all my overly detailed engineering/technical questions. He calls back when I leave messages. Shipment is taking a bit but the parts are partly made to order.

Turbos:

I was looking at https://www.turbobayperformance.com/products/ftw-50jxr-nissan-juke-turbocharger-upgrade and they have a killer bolt-on Juke turbo with a Garrett turbine wheel upgrade on their Stg2 and Stg3 turbo. Since I'm transmission limited and rpm limited, not much good to me but a really nice bolt-on upgrade for those 6spd guys. Not sure how much exhaust flow there is available thru the 5cm^2 turbine housing but it's an improvement in any case.

I don't feel a huge turbo on these CVT is worth it based on the engine torque limitations and rpm shift points. I'll be running the Mambatek with the big billet compressor wheel and upgraded/retrofitted 9 blade turbine. A bit small but should be good for 300-310 h.p. without generating too much backpressure and perfect for a quick hitting daily driver. I'll do a little piece on rebuilding the turbo when I put in the turbine wheel. I might have the compressor and turbine wheel dynamically balanced as a set but I think it's overkill if they are individually balanced already, gotta investigate that one.

Engine weight balancing:

OK, on this particular build I will NOT be running a lightened crank pulley. I know all you crazy Jukesters love these things but I've run mine and it was seriously disappointing. I ran the 2J pulley years ago and my CVT AWD did NOT not like it. I don't know why but I don't care either, when I switched back to stock I picked up so much bottom end torque it was like an upgrade going back to stock.

Those will say that these are crank pulleys used to reduce NVH and not harmonic balancers, but I don't feel that's the case. My built engine will be run with a brand new OEM Nissan crank pulley and if I can dynamically balance to a higher tolerance than stock I'll have it done. The pistons and rods will be matched weighted if they need it, not sure how good they are from 2J. My rebuilt torque converter was already dynamically balanced from CVC (Consolidated vehicle converters, Inc.) but I might have a shop take a look at what they can do to improve that as well. The flex plate is so light I don't think it needs balancing. A lot of this balancing is probably not needed since I won't push beyond the 6000 rpm up-shift point, an rpm that usually just starts making a difference in engine balancing, but I'm picky.

Again, I like my engine bearings in good shape and the factory know best about making them live a long time. Main bearing life can really be extended if the engine static/dynamic balancing is spot on. I'll post later a great article that goes into deep detail about this subject.
 

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I don't feel a huge turbo on these CVT is worth it based on the engine torque limitations and rpm shift points.
I'm certain you're right. YOLO 😂
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Juklear,

The Dude.....love it.
 

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But, sometimes there's a man...and I'm talking about The Dude, here. Sometimes there's a man, well, he's the man for his time and place.

Suffice it to say I've spent more than one Halloween wearing pink jellies and a bathrobe, sipping (read: not at all) white Russians and uh, green.. Russians?

To actually contribute to this discussion, I am BLOWN AWAY that you're gonna forgo the pulley. That's one of the very few things I've done to my car that I didn't feel like was subjective. Just better, not matter how you slice it. Very interesting development, but hey, go with what you like.

You may have given early estimates, but what are you figuring you'll be able to squeeze out of that motor mileage wise, with all the various fortifications and deck sleeving? There's a lot of ins, a lot of outs, a lot of what-have-you's

Juklear,

The Dude.....love it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Pulley was a downer for me.......just did not work. The harmonic balancer on my other 4 cylinder car was a solid rubber and steel pulley. On that car lighter pulleys were known to destroy built engines very quickly because the engine needed that big rubber core in the pulley to absorb crankshaft vibrations.

The OE Nissan pulley seems to have just a thin disc of rubber so maybe it is just an accessory pulley and not a harmonic dampener. I like having some weight on this side of the engine when the the opposite side is swinging a 40 lb torque converter. On a manual trans car the flywheel is about 15 - 18 lbs and the pressure plate and clutch housing another 15 - 20 lbs, typically. The CVT are swinging a 35 - 40 lb torque converter of smaller diameter than a clutch. The MOI are possibly the same but I would have to calculate that.

My point here being is that too much weight removal off the crankshaft could affect bottom end torque and engine vibration, very similar to a lightweight flywheel.

For example, on a Manual trans car an 18 lb flywheel is heavy, 14 lbs is perfect though low rpm torque off idle is affected, 12 lbs starts really affecting low rpm launching, 10 lbs nearly impossible to launch the car without high rpm clutch slip. That is a fine line between perfect and not perfect of only a few lbs off the crankshaft.

On the 2J pulley I ran back in 2013 on my AWD CVT, I detected a lack of low rpm torque. I honestly don’t remember much vibration increase if any. The pulley is several lbs lighter and lacks the isolating rubber ring. It’s very nicely machined and anodized black with visible timing marks, though belt fitment was very tight. I noticed minimal high rpm powered gains, but there were gains of maybe 2-3 hp at nearly 6000 rpms.

I know everyone else love these pulleys so I won’t try and convince anyone else but on my ride it’s OE pulley for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Mileage estimates are 100k plus. The forged pistons are gonna wear the bores more though. From my understanding engine warmup is mandatory, not optional on this setup. The upsides are worth it though. IMHO the Juke have a strongish stock piston but the rods are more questionable. I’m not taking any chances in case I get a boost spike or detonation. Plus, the forged pistons and rods cost maybe $500 more than the OE rods and pistons, not that much of a difference.

It’s very likely the 2J upgraded rods could be reused on another rebuild, maybe just requiring a piston swap. They are rated for 650 whp. The stock parts I don’t think that’s the case. The V1 engine blcok can easily handle 1 engine rebuild due to the thicker iron bore liner thickness.....possibly 2 rebuilds. The V2 engine block liner is much thinner. Once it’s out of spec it’s a throwaway block.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
It'd be great if they could. I can contact them or maybe Fluidampr.
 

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Rotational mass has advantages for sure.

Would be interesting to do your build. Break it in then add the pulley for kicks. It wont break the motor but drive it for a tank of gas and see what she is like.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Probably could try it once I pay for everything else first. It’s like a lighter flywheel, little less bottom end torque off the line, more high rpm power.

I'll be tearing down the front timing chain case on Sunday with juicy pictures of all that good stuff. The engine is a little bit top heavy on my stand so the cylinder head will get removed next after that. I have to make space on my pushcarts to store all the engine components nice and neatly. I have (1) pushcart with (2) shelves another smaller one with (3) shelves. It'll probably be enough to hold the entire engine spread out and it'll look cool as well. That is that part about being organized........the main battle during a build.

I'm going to be replacing most of the load bearing studs/bolts on the engine with brand new ones. That includes new head studs, main studs, ARP rod bolts, exhaust/turbo studs, intake manifold bolts, etc. They are cheap enough that it's worth the effort, snapping these bad boys is a mother to remove. The exhaust manifold is getting replaced as well since they eventually crack anyway.

The engine block corrosion is minimal and I'll be using a high quality brass drill brush and WD40 to make it sparkle. Then it'll get hot-tanked and I'll probably dunk it in a big plastic container to wash it (5-6) times to guarantee no gunk comes out of the oil galleys during engine break-in. An in-line turbocharger oil-line filter will be installed during the engine break-in to prevent turbo charger failure. I might paint the block. The cast aluminum paint looks pretty good if the block is cleaned/primed correctly. The water pump housing looks a little more corroded so that one is a good candidate to maybe bead blast and then paint as well. The cylinder head will be untouched though for maximum cooling. Wishing I painted the transmission case but at this point it's clean enough and I'll deal with the corrosion on the next transmission rebuild.

Anyway, the plan is to: 1) Organize the carts 2) Quickly teardown the motor 3) Lay everything out neatly 4) Inspect for damage 5) Start ordering replacement parts. 6) Find machine shops.
 

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A performance damper/harmonic balancer isn't about additional rotating mass, it is about absorbing drivetrain shock/harmonics. Mass is kept to a minimum while still allowing it to function. The reduced shock on crank, rods, timing chain, etc., allows for more power to be generated at higher RPM without it blowing up.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1hX1liR7r8

And it isn't just for NASCAR.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ASoh2uxYEsQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0yqRWdrxFc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x9DNONJGHMI


ATI does make custom units, but I wonder if they have something already available...
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Word. The torsional harmonics were mentioned already as a durability concern, the weight was and is also a consideration too. Once I lighten or increase the piston/rod weight I’ll have to externally rebalance the engine or internally via the crank shaft somehow. When I ran a lightweight flywheel previously on another car with a harmonic balancer, I had a wicked harmonic at 6500 rpms. It could not have been healthy for the rod/crank bearings. That balancer ended up flying off the car.

So the weight is also a factor, the damper can just suck that energy up......or correct weighting can counter the torsional forces.

Good links, thanks for posting.
 

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That last part is very good to know. I will plan on a junker swap instead of a rebuild if and when I wreck this motor. I hope the higher compression on the V2, and the efficiency of the Bloushe turbo will be a good combo for relative longevity on a modified car. Will be interesting (and fun) to find out.

Mileage estimates are 100k plus. The forged pistons are gonna wear the bores more though. From my understanding engine warmup is mandatory, not optional on this setup. The upsides are worth it though. IMHO the Juke have a strongish stock piston but the rods are more questionable. I’m not taking any chances in case I get a boost spike or detonation. Plus, the forged pistons and rods cost maybe $500 more than the OE rods and pistons, not that much of a difference.

It’s very likely the 2J upgraded rods could be reused on another rebuild, maybe just requiring a piston swap. They are rated for 650 whp. The stock parts I don’t think that’s the case. The V1 engine blcok can easily handle 1 engine rebuild due to the thicker iron bore liner thickness.....possibly 2 rebuilds. The V2 engine block liner is much thinner. Once it’s out of spec it’s a throwaway block.
 

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Dont forget pics of the Intake runners and valves. Curious people want to know how the Gen1 deals with carbon build up.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Pics on the runners and valves......check. The V2 motor use some kind of plasma spray cylinder liner. If it’s within spec, it’s reusable. I’m going to check my bore wear to see if there is any significant wear before it’s sent to the machine shop. I’ll create a build sheet and document all this stuff. I’m planning for 10:1 conpression so that with the bigger turbo and the repaired CVT should boost fuel economy as well. I’m looking forward to improving some of the response. The test pipe and downpipe are really gonna open up the exhaust, possibly fixing my fuel demand at WOT. Lots to do.
 
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