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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to decide whether it's worth it to spring for the AWD. Is it a full time all wheel /4 wheel drive? I can't quite tell from the description. I don't live in very snowy country, although there are a couple of times every winter I could use it to get down my hill.

Complicating matters is the fact that the manual transmission only comes with the upper level trims, but does NOT come with the AWD, right? Very confusing!

This is what Motor Trend says about the AWD system:

Of particular note is the Juke's available all-wheel-drive system, which sports torque-vectoring technology, a first for a Nissan crossover. This advanced system splits torque up to 50/50 between the front and rear axles, and, more important, routs torque side to side across the rear axle, which reduces understeer and heightens cornering agility by spinning the outside tire 5- to 10-mph faster than the inside one. To accommodate the additional hardware and complement the improved performance, Juke AWD gets a multi-link rear suspension in favor of the FWD's torsion beam. Over our winding test loop through the mountains, the Juke's torque-vectoring system -- at 64 pounds, it's the lightest of its type in the world, according to Nissan -- made quick work of tight turns and sweeping esses, rotating the rear end effortlessly and composedly. Wearing V-rated 215/55R17 Goodyear Eagle RS-A all-season tires, the Juke is about as "tossable" as small crossovers come.

Read more: 2011 Nissan Juke First Drive - Motor Trend

and then there's that thing about no spare tire with the AWD. So, . . . is it safer? Worth the money? And is anybody considering a manual tranny?
 

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The AWD has three modes - FWD, Tourer Vectoring AWD, and Symmetrical (50:50) AWD. If you have AAA, you don't need a spare.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
hmm. things I've been reading seem to indicate "the only thing useful on pavement is full-time AWD" -- which this isn't, then, right?

at least the manual is available in the top trims, which is pretty unusual. Maybe an SEL FWD manual would be a good option. But then you miss out on the fancy torque-vectoring thing. Bah!
 

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Personally speaking, I'm really debating about the manual tranny. But I need and want the AWD more than the manual option. Technically it's not a full time AWD system. What happens is its primarily a FWD with 50% of the torque on the front left wheel and the other 50% on the front right wheel. This enables the Juke to save on gas instead of powering all 4 wheels unless it needs to. What happens is depending on the road condition and your steering angle it will take away some torque from the front wheels and divide it between the rear wheels.

Here's a few videos of how the system works and also the difference between the FWD Juke and the AWD Juke is.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2csjbuwMC3Q

YouTube - Nissan Juke Torque Vectoring AWD


hmm. things I've been reading seem to indicate "the only thing useful on pavement is full-time AWD" -- which this isn't, then, right?

at least the manual is available in the top trims, which is pretty unusual. Maybe an SEL FWD manual would be a good option. But then you miss out on the fancy torque-vectoring thing. Bah!
This is a million times better on pavement than full-time AWD. Full-time AWD can cause oversteer in pavement while the torque vectoring AWD prevents understeer and oversteer in almost any condition.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
and this from Consumer Reports:

The myth of 4WD

Last reviewed: August 2009
One of the reasons many people buy a traditional sport-utility vehicle is for the extra security and traction of four-wheel drive. But for most drivers, 4WD may be overkill. The type of vehicle that's best for you depends on the types of conditions you typically face. For rain and light snow, two-wheel drive will likely work fine. Front-wheel drive with traction control is preferred. AWD is fine for normal snow conditions or for traveling on packed sand or dirt roads. For more severe conditions, you should opt for 4WD.
In addition, a common misconception is that 4WD and AWD systems help in all driving situations. In fact, those systems provide added traction only when accelerating. They do not help in braking or cornering.
Drivers often make the mistake of using less caution when driving in slippery conditions with a 4WD vehicle, and they pay the consequences by sliding off the road and sometimes rolling over. Because the added traction of 4WD can allow a vehicle to accelerate more quickly in slippery conditions, drivers need to be more vigilant, not less. For extra help in braking, get a vehicle with antilock brakes. For a cornering aid, look for an electronic-stability-control (ESC) system. But neither of these systems can overcome the laws of physics. Slippery conditions demand extra caution, no matter what you drive.
 

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You have to remember 4wd systems like this weren't the norm even as early as last year. So when consumer reports did that review in a way there were correct. However 4wd technology has advanced greatly which is clearly evident in the Juke's torque vectoring system. The way the system works on the Juke is that it limits the amount of torque going to the wheel that is most likely to loose traction and increases the torque to the ones that wont. Which in turn increases your grip by a lot. Lastly the part about being vigilant can be said about any kind of car. If you were going to crash/lose traction in an AWD car due to yourself not being vigilant. You would get the same result in a FWD car as well.
 

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The AWD has three modes - FWD, Tourer Vectoring AWD, and Symmetrical (50:50) AWD. If you have AAA, you don't need a spare.
AAA won't get you a new tire they will just change the spare...if no spare then they will just tow it. If at night your stuck. I would much rather have a spare then depend on AAA. I like to do road trips a lot so this kind of a big deal for me.
 

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AAA won't get you a new tire they will just change the spare...if no spare then they will just tow it. If at night your stuck. I would much rather have a spare then depend on AAA. I like to do road trips a lot so this kind of a big deal for me.
Why would you be stuck at night? If the Juke doesn't have a spare, AAA will tow you wherever depending on your membership level -- the Plus Membership offers 100 miles of free towing.
 

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What advantages would a Manual Transmission have compared to the CVT's Tiptronic? This isn't a sports car -- you aren't going to be having a lot of fun throwing those gears around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
well, it's clear this is in no way an off-road vehicle, so not sure why they'd put AWD on there anyway. Are you saying this is this is a new kind of AWD made for dry pavement?

As for the manual--I just like the idea of "saving the manuals." And a lot of people are NOT fans of the CVT.
 

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Why would you be stuck at night? If the Juke doesn't have a spare, AAA will tow you wherever depending on your membership level -- the Plus Membership offers 100 miles of free towing.

Uh because maybe the fact that very few places I know of have 24hr car tire places ..lol. Past 8 or 9 your leaving your car overnight. You shouldn't have to depend on a tow to get a tire on...a spare tire has been standard basic equipment forever. I can't imagine in the year 2010 not to have one.
 

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well, it's clear this is in no way an off-road vehicle, so not sure why they'd put AWD on there anyway. Are you saying this is this is a new kind of AWD made for dry pavement?

As for the manual--I just like the idea of "saving the manuals." And a lot of people are NOT fans of the CVT.
Conventional AWD systems would have a set amount of torque going to each wheel. It doesn't change regardless of road conditions or steering angle. Which doesn't really help that much on dry pavement. Nissan's torque vectoring system has a very advanced computer that has several sensors to determine the best amount of torque to deliver to each wheel. That video I posted even shows the percent of torque going to each wheel in different situations. Also this is more of an off-road car than 90% of suv's that came out within the past few years.
 

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What advantages would a Manual Transmission have compared to the CVT's Tiptronic? This isn't a sports car -- you aren't going to be having a lot of fun throwing those gears around.

the manual is faster than the cvt and is costs here a 4000 euro's less
manual problably saves more fuel

and I don;t like the car changing the gear by itself like the old CVT from nissan. If you're getting to a corner and using the tiptronic, it reacts way to slow.

But then for me, I am going to enjoy throwing the gear's but that just the style of driving where the passion lies
 

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Uh because maybe the fact that very few places I know of have 24hr car tire places ..lol. Past 8 or 9 your leaving your car overnight. You shouldn't have to depend on a tow to get a tire on...a spare tire has been standard basic equipment forever. I can't imagine in the year 2010 not to have one.
The first thing I did in my 350z was remove the spare and replace it with a subwoofer box and amp. Before that I owned a Scion tC, and I did the same thing. I guess I'm just used to AAA towing me somewhere then dealing with the fix the next day.
 

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the manual is faster than the cvt and is costs here a 4000 euro's less
manual problably saves more fuel

and I don;t like the car changing the gear by itself like the old CVT from nissan. If you're getting to a corner and using the tiptronic, it reacts way to slow.

But then for me, I am going to enjoy throwing the gear's but that just the style of driving where the passion lies
It is faster, I'm a whore for clutchless driving though (even my 350z is --gasp-- an automatic), and I know I'm in the minority, so take what i say with a huge boulder of salt. I do believe the CVT is more fuel efficient, but totally see the logic in being able to downshift without lag.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ugh. VERY mixed info on whether the AWD/CVT combination is best. I'm so confused! Here's from the Canadian Autoguide review: 2011 Nissan Juke Review: Car Reviews
The 6-speed manual, available on front drive models only, isn’t as good as the MINI gearbox, but is enjoyable to use, with crisp throws and a clutch that is easy to modulate around town and provides adequate feedback.
A CVT is also available on FWD or AWD models, and will be fine for most buyers, but it still has the motorboat effect of holding a constant rpm. When combined with the Juke’s whiny engine note, it becomes tiresome fast. The manual mode alleviates some of these concerns, with six “gears” to choose from, and a reasonable facsimile of a throttle blip, but it still pales next to the manual.
. . .
Enthusiasts with a penchant for reading the technical columns of car magazines will tell you to go for the AWD model, with the aforementioned suspension and the torque vectoring all-wheel drive system, but this isn’t necessarily the case. While it’s impressive that you can get the Juke with such a high-tech torque vectoring AWD system that distributes power front to rear and side to side in the back, and it’s true that it only adds an extra 60 lbs of weight, the AWD system does feel a bit unnatural while the stiffer rear springs deliver a slightly less comfortable ride; plus, then you’re stuck with the CVT.
So this one votes for the FWD/Manual combo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
and here's a review that seems to indicate that the Juke is "unstable" without the AWD/torque vectoring addition: 2011 Nissan Juke Reviews, Pictures and Prices - U.S. News Rankings and Reviews

the Juke can be unstable at times. Some reviewers experienced wheel spin on wet pavement. Others report that on dry pavement the Juke lacks traction at high speeds. Reviewers like the optional All-Wheel-Drive and Integrated Control (I-CON) systems that maximize stability and handling.
 

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Edmunds' InsideLine seemed to be very impressed with the FWD S' handling. They have yet to review the AWD version which I assume will have better launch and skidpad numbers.
 
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