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Discussion Starter #1
Maybe you’ve heard the news: The Juke is direct injected. That means that gasoline (you know, that smelly explosive stuff) goes right into the engine’s cylinder where it gets lit on fire by a miniscule spark of electricity from one of your spark plugs. This causes a boom that moves your piston and makes Jukeys fun to drive. However, these booms also leave tiny bits of carbon deposit waste behind inside the cylinder. And as your mileage goes up, the thickness of carbon residue on your fuel injectors will as well. Especially if you use lower grades of gasoline.

The Nissan dealership has stated to me that the Juke fuel injectors are infallible but a small amount of internet research on the topic will speak to the contrary. I hope to shed some factual evidence on the matter right now.

If this service will be required/suggested on your Juke is certainly open to debate as there are many factors to consider. How does it drive now, how long do you intend to keep it, how much do you love it, are you going to expect higher-than-average performance out of this motor, etc etc.

As a related sidenote, I would like to state that I have had a recurring P-0303 Cylinder 3 Misfire code since I originally purchased the vehicle one year ago. I had the head rebuilt to replace a burnt exhaust valve immediately after buying Jukeys but the issue never went away as the original cause of the burnt valve (running lean due to a dirty fuel injector) was not addressed. So I was not surprised when the code reappeared 4 months after the rebuild but the mechanics had proven to hit their limit of expertise and were no longer involved in the troubleshooting and diagnosis. In other words: they were notoriously unimpressive problem solvers.

That being said, if you experience a cylinder misfire code (P0300, P0301, P0302, P0303, P0304), and you have confirmed good spark plug, good compression, good fuel pressure, and good coil pack (all essentially free tests you can rule out one step at a time), then your next peek-a-boo should be pulling these fuel injectors and having them serviced. I did this process at 99k miles, however the misfire code had been prevalent (and ignored) significantly before I purchased the car at 75k miles. Therefore I cannot definitively or conclusively say WHEN you should perform this or even IF you will benefit from this service. I know it helped my situation and believe that it will most likely help with yours as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
THE PROCESS



Step 0.
Get the Field Service Manual. It is out there waiting for you. Search. Download. Or buy. I don’t care. But get the service manual. I am only going to be providing brief notes and real life pictures to accompany the directions for this process that are clearly illustrated in the FSM.

Pages of interest in the FSM:
Your instructions will be on page EM-52. It’s basically 14 steps to get the fuel injectors out. Reassembly instructions begin on EM-54 and they are worth reviewing, but could be summarized as “install in the reverse you took it apart”

Exploded diagrams for reference of things you will be taking apart: EM-27, EM-43, EM-46, and EM-51.

When you look at these exploded diagrams, you’ll see a variety of one-time-use parts. These are probably not mandatory replacement things, and chances are you’ll survive if you reuse it all. However, if you’re going to undertake a project of this scope, for Santa Claus sake, do it right and buy the recommended gaskets. I even did the hard part for you and identified each one so you can seek them out and order them ahead of time so super easily.

Part Description Part # MSRP
Intake Manifold Gasket - 140351KC0B 30.78
Fuel Tube - 17520-BV80A 75.58
Fuel rail connector - 175201KC0C 28.67
Fuel rail insulator - 16265-1KC0E 23.13
O-ring (blue) - 166181LA0A 5.63 (qty 4)
Backup ring - 166181LA0B 5.63 (qty 4)
Seal ring (white) - **** 166181LA0C **** 5.63 **** (qty 4)
Holder (injector) - 166121LA0A 6.62 (qty 4)
O-ring (oil level gauge guide) - 150664W000 0.53


I paid about $200 online for all of the parts required to properly do this rebuild. I will address a specific concern with regards to the white seal rings notated with the asterisks later on in this thread.
(picture of parts for reference)
P1010347.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #3
All right, let’s get started!


Step 1:
Release the fuel pressure. Easy peasy.
P1010352.jpg


Step 2:
Remove front bumper.
P1010353.jpg


Step 3:
Remove intercooler. (The Forge drops out so easily if you just undo the top two hose clamps)
P1010354.jpg


Step 4:
Remove dipstick… yissss, I can do this with much ease and experience.
P1010355.jpg


Step 5:
Remove intake manifold.
P1010356.jpg


Step 6:
Remove alternator. I’d recommend just removing the front passenger tire and dropping the inner fender to make removal and the later installation way easier.
P1010357.jpg


Step 7:
Remove oil level gauge guide. Interestingly enough, I found this to be one of the most challenging steps. For some reason, I struggled with poppin this guy out. Luckily, it went back in super easily. Ya just gotta wiggle it out just right.
P1010358.jpg


Step 8:
Remove fuel rail cover and fuel rail insulator.
P1010359.jpg


Step 9:
Remove fuel tube and rail connector.
P1010362.jpg


Step 10:
Disconnect fuel pressure sensor connector.
P1010363.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Step 11:
Disconnect fuel injector harness connectors.
P1010364.jpg


Step 12:
Free step, yay, breathe easy, this is not necessary, please proceed to 13, the best number ever.
(no picture)


Step 13:

Remove fuel rail.
There is no picture for this step because the FSM assumes that the fuel injectors will remain in the head and not in the fuel rail. When I removed my fuel rail, 3 of the injectors stayed in the rail and only 1 remained in the head. So I just popped out the last one before taking a pointless picture.

Step 14:
Remove fuel injectors from cylinder head.
P1010366.jpg


Now in the FSM, EM-53 is all about using this special fancy Nissan tool to remove the fuel injectors. Well that’s cool. For the record, if you just grab on nice and firm and give it a good solid yank you can save yourself a lot of time and money acquiring an unnecessary unitasker tool. But be careful, don’t hurt the things… they are sensitive little injectors.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Done. You have fuel injectors out. Presumably on the fuel rail. These are pictures of mine:

P1010367.jpg P1010368.jpg P1010369.jpg P1010370.jpg P1010371.jpg P1010374.jpg


Here’s what’s next:
Find a local shop that specializes in fuel injector servicing. They will have fancy dedicated specialized equipment to bench flow monitor/test/clean fuel injectors.

My (not so) local place was called Boost Lab located in Temple Terrace outside of Tampa. Ryan was very helpful and a pleasure to deal with there. So if you’re Tampan, use them for this service. Turnaround time is about 24 hours. Pricetag is about $100 for 4 injectors. I brought him the whole rail and all the replacement OEM gaskets so they could reseat the injectors and I wouldn’t have to worry about any of that nonsense.

Since the car was to be de-commissioned for at least a day while the injectors were out getting cleaned, I got a rental car for 48 hours. That was about $140.

This is Jukeys sitting in my shop patiently awaiting her new tummy.
P1010376.jpg

Now about those pesky aforementioned white seal rings. Those also require a fancy dedicated Nissan specific unitasker tool to put on. Good luck acquiring it. Ryan at BoostLab said he was unable to get it within 3 months. Weird, but he also said he always reuses those seals without problem anyways. Don’t worry about replacing it, he says. But I have the seals in hand and I want this done correctly---even if it is unnecessary. After all, I’ve come this far, let’s do it right. So I head to the Nissan dealership with new clean shiny fuel rail in one hand and OEM gaskets in a sealed bag in my other hand. I hand over the printed instructions from the FSM outlining the process required and the tools needed. Service tech guy goes back and speaks with the ‘lead mechanic’ back there and comes back with the following news: “Oh yea, we have that tool, but we need the car here to do this.” “No you don’t, you have the rail right in your hands, I just need the rings swapped out. The car is over an hour away in a shop, it’s not coming here.” “Oh, well then the mechanic says that without the car here, it’s pointless to replace them because they’ll pop off by the time you get it re-installed in the car.” Okay, so the dealership, no surprise here, is totally full of crap, as per the usual, and doesn’t want to actually do any work for anyone trying to do their job better than they themselves can do. But the ‘lead mechanic’ says it’ll be fine to re-use them. Suuuure he does.

To be clear, it is stated in bold lettering in the FSM: Do not reuse O-rings. Top of page EM-54, it gets its own line to make sure you can’t ignore it. No harm on Ryan for not being ABLE to, but screw the dealership for not being willing to perform a service for a paying customer. The fact of the matter is a dealership will sell you NEW injectors, which are several hundred dollars each, rather than do a cleaning (because, in their defense, they don’t have the equipment to do that) and replace the gaskets at 1/10th the price. Whether or not they actually had the tool is irrelevant; it was clear they were not willing to work for me so I ended up reinstalling the fuel injectors without replacing the O-rings. I’m sure it will be fine, but I wasn’t pleased with the situation.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Here is a picture of the before/after documentation of the fuel injectors. As you can see, my injector #3 was operating at about 80% efficiency, enough to cause my random misfire codes and cylinder 3 misfire codes.
P1010387.jpg


Cleaned fuel injector picture montage:
P1010378.jpg P1010379.jpg P1010382.jpg P1010383.jpg P1010384.jpg


That’s pretty much about it.

The whole removal process took me about 2.5 hours. Reinstallation took right about 2 hours. Get the FSM, there’s a wealth of good information in there to help you work effectively.

Total price for a DIY project was just around $440 ($200 parts, $100 cleaning, $140 rental car).

And yea, it made a difference in the Juke’s drivability. Worth the money, no regrets, no question about it.

Have a wonderful evening!

:vs-kiss:


-Thirteen
 

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Damn what a right up sir:vs_clap:. Looks simple enough and straight forward. It sucks about the dealer not helping you out, but I would say I'm not surprised if your talking about MAUS Nissan.
I did have a question on what type of fuel (brand) you use. Also do you regularly use any type of injection/fuel system cleaner.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I pretty much exclusively use Shell Premium 93+ that has all that fancy extra detergent crap in it. The only time I have used fuel system cleaner was in the past trying to troubleshoot the cylinder 3 misfire... and sure enough, it helped. But fuel system cleaner is only so effective compared to removing the injectors and letting the injector people do their magic. Granted, I do now intend on dumping a can of seafoam into the tank in addition to running a can through the intake for every oil change now (5k miles). I drive a lot and I drive hard so I try to over-maintain my vehicles to make sure they last forever. I want my money going to stupid stuff like rims and suspension and audio, not maintenance and repairs. Now that I have 'like new' injectors, I intend on keeping them performing as such.

If quality gas was used on the regular or fuel treatments were used on the regular, I would assume this amount of carbon buildup wouldn't be a problem with the Juke. However, I bought the car at 75k and it was clearly abused and disrespected. I imagine they used the cheapest gas they could find and did no maintenance which led to it not performing well. Luckily, I fully intend on giving her a new light on life.
 

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One of the better write-ups I've seen. Lots of info and pictures. Great Job! I was told by a dealership by me the injectors and spark plugs are good up to and beyond 100K miles. Judging from your photos and experience this might be accurate, but they will definitely need a good servicing potentially sooner than that.
 

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Awesome write up.

Anyone know what the average Dealer would charge if they were to do this job?

It was good to see the cleaned injectors get back up to factory spec.
 

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Awesome !!!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
All I ask in exchange for my growing number of stickies is that ya'll get me some headlight retrofit builds. Throw some love to my shop round here, I need another side project for income. The next person who asks "where do I get a retrofit for a Juke" and ya'll don't say THIRTEEN, I'mma get all grumpy and such. And a grumpy 13 doesn't spend hours of his free time documenting the work on his Juke for mass consumption. Grumpy 13 stays offline. And nobody wants 13 offline.

Lookin at you CDN and Macgyver.... lolol.... Keeping this level of operation running ain't cheap!



::clears throat::

What I meant to say was... Thank you Swiftab; just glad to help. Hope it provides helpful to people out there!
 

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Woah. Schooled! Class dismissed!

I think you should become a Vendor and throw some pricing out there. Make it all attractive to switch from our poor halogen outputs and into your builds!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I'd like to add one more critical note to this write-up, now that it has been a week since I have completed the rebuild and have driven daily in a variety of conditions:


CYLINDER 3 MISFIRE CODE AND RANDOM MISFIRE CODE ARE NO LONGER PRESENT.

This is a massive deal to me, this has been a struggle to resolve for a year now, and we ran the scans tonight and no ghost codes, no nothing. Juke is running CORRECTLY.

I cannot WAIT to go shove this in the dealerhips face! lol
 

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CDN, can I just charge admission to read my threads? :p

nah nah, just playin, I'm here to spread the love and the knowledge. Let's all grow together in our appreciation of this funny lil car. I'm here to help out people as needed. I am fortunate enough that that approach to life has provided enough resources for me to continue to grow myself. Good stuff.
 

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Very good stuff. Thank you for your contributions thus far and congrats on ridding your Juke of those misfire codes - ghost or not!
 

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Thats Awesome news.

Not sure if you can put up pricing here. But having someone here to do retrofits is awesome.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Jukeys still drives like pukeys, but wastegate actuator is en route and re-tune is on standby for after the install. Been away at a 5 day camping music festival, so slowly getting back to reality and gotta pick up everything where I left off.

WHOOOOOOOO
 

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I do now intend on dumping a can of seafoam into the tank in addition to running a can through the intake for every oil change now (5k miles).
Excellent write up 13! You have a bit of tech writer in you.

May I suggest a fuel system cleaner that is very similar in composition and price point yet superior to Sea Foam?

I've used Sea Foam for decades in my vehicles and power equipment with satisfactory results based on realistic expectations for this type of product. However, I've recently switched from Sea Foam to Gum Out Multi-System Tune-Up. In addition to what you'll find in Sea Foam the Gum Out contains P.E.A. (polyetheramine), a truly effective over the counter high temperature detergent. Various test results have shown P.E.A. to be one of the better modern elixirs in retail fuel additives for dealing with carbon deposits on intake valves and in the combustion chamber.

Think of the Gum Out Multi-System Tune-Up as Sea Foam 2.0. I use it regularly in the tank as well as for induction cleaning at each oil change on the wife's Juke and my '91 BMW 318is. I no longer use any fuel system additive unless it contains P.E.A. which is found in products like Red Line SI-1 Fuel System Cleaner and Techron Fuel System Clean as well as others.
 
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