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Discussion Starter #1
Or is it enough to get the relevant hoses out of the way, extract the spark plugs, insert new NGKs, reattach existing coil packs+boots, and reattach hoses?
 

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you should not have to g anywhere near the intake manifold on a mr16ddt to change the spark plugs. here is a video on how to do it:

youtube video
Thanks, that makes the job a lot easier! I believe the dealership mentioned something about a gasket being required in the process. Thought they were talking about the intake manifold.
 

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There is a gasket from the charge pipe connected to the turbocharger, leading toward the intercooler. You have to remove it to access the plugs. I replaced the gasket when I did mine, as recommended, but some people don't. It should be less than $5 at the dealer.
 

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There is a gasket from the charge pipe connected to the turbocharger, leading toward the intercooler. You have to remove it to access the plugs. I replaced the gasket when I did mine, as recommended, but some people don't. It should be less than $5 at the dealer.
Oh I see, would you happen to know the part #?
 

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I want to say I was able to get my coils and plugs out without removing the upper intercooler pipe. Then again I have the Injen hard pipes so maybe that's the difference between factory and aftermarket. The #3 coil and plug is a pain to get at regardless, so it may be best just to remove the upper pipe and replace that gasket in the process. If you don't replace the gasket, you'll possibly throw a boost error code and have a boost leak that sounds like a dog whistle you can hear.
 
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I want to say I was able to get my coils and plugs out without removing the upper intercooler pipe. Then again I have the Injen hard pipes so maybe that's the difference between factory and aftermarket. The #3 coil and plug is a pain to get at regardless, so it may be best just to remove the upper pipe and replace that gasket in the process. If you don't replace the gasket, you'll possibly throw a boost error code and have a boost leak that sounds like a dog whistle you can hear.
Thanks, part of me was considering reusing the old one.
 

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Thanks, part of me was considering reusing the old one.
You could also spew oil blow-by through this leak. I did, it was not fun to clean up.
 
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Hell no do not even touch the intake manifold. If you remove the intake manifold, throttle body connection, or MAP sensor connection. You can kiss your juke from running efficiently good bye. Once the harness you disconnect any sensor on the juke you will have to reprogram and calibrate the throttle body and Map at Nissan with software.

bs videos on YouTube don’t work. I had a customers come in crying stating “ahh my juke doesn’t run efficiently”.

Why because he disconnected the manifold to change the gasket. Don’t do it or your car will not perform efficiently afterwards.
If you are required to disconnect any harness I would advice you to buy a decent obd2 memory saver so you don’t undo any programming while your doing diy services on your vehicle.

Best of luck
 

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Hell no do not even touch the intake manifold. If you remove the intake manifold, throttle body connection, or MAP sensor connection. You can kiss your juke from running efficiently good bye. Once the harness you disconnect any sensor on the juke you will have to reprogram and calibrate the throttle body and Map at Nissan with software.

bs videos on YouTube don’t work. I had a customers come in crying stating “ahh my juke doesn’t run efficiently”.

Why because he disconnected the manifold to change the gasket. Don’t do it or your car will not perform efficiently afterwards.
If you are required to disconnect any harness I would advice you to buy a decent obd2 memory saver so you don’t undo any programming while your doing diy services on your vehicle.

Best of luck
I unplug and remove intake manifolds all the time...all you have to do is do a fuel trim reset using the battery and the cars run perfectly fine. My personal Juke has the intake manifold taken off almost once a month for parts test fitting and design stuff, as long as you dont move the throttle plate or let anything touch the map sensor, the car will run fine.

There are several people on here that have come to me for parts installs which involve removing several sensors to do the job, and not one has had drive-ability issues after. Most issues associated with "unplugging a sensor" is the sensor is either dropped, damaged, or dirty. E-Throttle bodies like the Juke and all other nissans should never, ever be actuated when removed from the car, as it throws off the internal calibrations, but you can unplug it and plug it back in a hundred times and it will not effect how the car runs if done properly.
 

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If the Map or Throttle body sensor is unplugged it causes issues in the oroginal ecu software. Perfomance or random spontaneous pre shut off of the vehicle occurs. I seen it a lot in modified Jukes at the dealership service center I work at as a side job.
The ecu software has to be reflash back to oem. For me It’s a easy 700$ repair with Nissan provided reflashing software.
The issues don’t acutely develop, they gradually corrupt the ecu. Majority of the time the tow truck brings in the vehicle for reflashing. For me it’s an Easy 600$ Service job due to a customer unplugging certain sensors. Also at our service center we mark certain sensors just Incase the client intentionally modifies the vehicle for off road performance and comes back claiming no DIY modification were made. I have to voice out and voided a few warranties now and then. I did it for a GTR once due to the map corrupting the ecu and causing lots of electrical problems.
 

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I was a AA Diag Tech at Nissan for years, and a AA diag Tech at Firestone as well. You do not have to reflash the ecu. Disconnect the battery, unplug the sensors. Do the work, install the sensors back in, fuel trim reset with the battery, re-attach the battery, idle the car for 3-5 minutes. Drive it. Me and thousands of other people do it every day all the time. If what you are saying was true, NO ONE would be able to do diy repairs to these cars, or swap out intercooler piping, or intakes, or downpipes. Hell, if what you where saying was true, reflashing the ECU with ECUtek or Uprev would basically make it so you can never replace a sensor on the car if it brakes without losing your tune.
 

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We reflash every ecu here in Houston at the dealership I work at. Ever since DIY tuning because available it was mandated at our service center. In a week I generally see about 4-5 vehicles with faulty tuning needing repair. Every dealership is different but at the Nissan I do repair at they don’t compromise safety for anything. Once any off-road tampering has been confirmed on any vehicle the customer automatically forfeits their vehicle warranty period.
 

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We reflash every ecu here in Houston at the dealership I work at. Ever since DIY tuning because available it was mandated at our service center. In a week I generally see about 4-5 vehicles with faulty tuning needing repair. Every dealership is different but at the Nissan I do repair at they don’t compromise safety for anything. Once any off-road tampering has been confirmed on any vehicle the customer automatically forfeits their vehicle warranty period.
Your dealership is ripping people off. lol I lived in Houston for a while, what dealership is it?
 

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Magnussen Moss warranty act protects consumers, and the dealership has to prove that any modification was the direct cause of the issue. The burden of proof is on the dealer. If your dealership tried that with me, I would sue the crap out of them. Since it is a repeated violation of Federal law, I would find other people and do a class action.

SEMA provides resources to support consumers who modify their vehicle.

 
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