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Th turbo will easily outlast the cvt assuming the oil feed line does not clog. Some juke cvts fail after 30k miles, some fail at 140k miles. I did an oil feed line on a juke last summer with 170k miles on it, stock turbo, second cvt. The days of turbochargers having a "lifespan" are over. New bearing and oiling technology has fixed that. There are Subaru WRX's from 2002 rolling around with 300k miles on the stock turbo. My first Juke when i got rid of it had north of 140k mile, full bolt ons and i beat the snot out of it. When I put it back to stock I checked for shaft play on the turbo, it had the normal amount.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Th turbo will easily outlast the cvt assuming the oil feed line does not clog. Some juke cvts fail after 30k miles, some fail at 140k miles. I did an oil feed line on a juke last summer with 170k miles on it, stock turbo, second cvt. The days of turbochargers having a "lifespan" are over. New bearing and oiling technology has fixed that. There are Subaru WRX's from 2002 rolling around with 300k miles on the stock turbo. My first Juke when i got rid of it had north of 140k mile, full bolt ons and i beat the snot out of it. When I put it back to stock I checked for shaft play on the turbo, it had the normal amount.
Well looks like the answer is more obvious than I thought. Right now our Juke is in mint condition low mileage and mechanically runs like a champ but I want to be ahead of the game so if we need to be out of the Juke we're out of the Juke before something major like the CVT dies. For me I'd rather cut my losses and trade it in when it is mechanically running and start fresh with a new car rather than replacing something like the CVT. Also read what you said about the CVT going into limp mode and that is basically the beginning of the end.
 

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I don't lose sleep over turbo reliability, just avoid the hot shutdowns. The Mitsubishi turbo's are damned reliable, it's usually a fluke when they fail or morons run non-synthetic and hot-shutdown. My 80k mile stock turbo had standard axial and radial shaft play, I'll tear it down and post pics but I believe it held up well, haven't had a chance to do a post mortem on it but it was getting upgraded.

Man, there is a lot of fear mongering going on around the CVT I've noticed. On a stock vehicle, people are getting +100,000 miles if it's not driven by an imbecile. That means no WOT runs when the trans is cold, NO brake torque launches, filling the CVT oil to EXACTLY the correct level, and so on. Slap mods on it, and they won't last much past 70,000-80,000 miles. They can take some abuse but realistically no it won't last driven that way.

From your sig it shows you have a 2015, you potentially have the revised CVT transmission for the Gen2, the JF016E (CVT8). It has a couple of critical improvements over the Gen1 JF011E including a completely redesigned mechatronic unit or valvebody design eliminating the troublesome ratio control stepper and reducing the internal valve counts down from 12 to something like 6-8 valves. It has a heavily revised and reinforced CVT pushbelt, the Bosch 901074 (28x12) which runs with a revised belt element design for better high rpm operation, running less belt pressure for improved fuel economy, & the torque rating is +400 N-m (294 lb-ft) according to Bosch. Plus the JF016E has the upgraded pulley sheave axial slider pins instead of the troublesome 6mm ball bearings, and so on. A couple of the existing JF011E design flaws remaining, most notably the old oil pump relief valve design. If you are set on trading it, it's your choice but actually the Gen2 CVT is a big huge improvement including revised TCM programming with the near instant torque converter lockup and so forth. The Gen2 CVT transmission is actually a very nice unit. If I had the Gen2 I'd upgrade the forward clutch pack & reinforce the forward drum, slap in the Sonnex oil pump relief piston upgrade, and it'd be good to about 294 lb-ft at the crank.

On a stock vehicle, I'd rock that Gen2 all day long without concern with some good AMSOIL fluid, an external cooler, and some preventative maintenance.
 

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I don't lose sleep over turbo reliability, just avoid the hot shutdowns. The Mitsubishi turbo's are damned reliable, it's usually a fluke when they fail or morons run non-synthetic and hot-shutdown. My 80k mile stock turbo had standard axial and radial shaft play, I'll tear it down and post pics but I believe it held up well, haven't had a chance to do a post mortem on it but it was getting upgraded.

Man, there is a lot of fear mongering going on around the CVT I've noticed. On a stock vehicle, people are getting +100,000 miles if it's not driven by an imbecile. That means no WOT runs when the trans is cold, NO brake torque launches, filling the CVT oil to EXACTLY the correct level, and so on. Slap mods on it, and they won't last much past 70,000-80,000 miles. They can take some abuse but realistically no it won't last driven that way.

From your sig it shows you have a 2015, you potentially have the revised CVT transmission for the Gen2, the JF016E (CVT8). It has a couple of critical improvements over the Gen1 JF011E including a completely redesigned mechatronic unit or valvebody design eliminating the troublesome ratio control stepper and reducing the internal valve counts down from 12 to something like 6-8 valves. It has a heavily revised and reinforced CVT pushbelt, the Bosch 901074 (28x12) which runs with a revised belt element design for better high rpm operation, running less belt pressure for improved fuel economy, & the torque rating is +400 N-m (294 lb-ft) according to Bosch. Plus the JF016E has the upgraded pulley sheave axial slider pins instead of the troublesome 6mm ball bearings, and so on. A couple of the existing JF011E design flaws remaining, most notably the old oil pump relief valve design. If you are set on trading it, it's your choice but actually the Gen2 CVT is a big huge improvement including revised TCM programming with the near instant torque converter lockup and so forth. The Gen2 CVT transmission is actually a very nice unit. If I had the Gen2 I'd upgrade the forward clutch pack & reinforce the forward drum, slap in the Sonnex oil pump relief piston upgrade, and it'd be good to about 294 lb-ft at the crank.

On a stock vehicle, I'd rock that Gen2 all day long without concern with some good AMSOIL fluid, an external cooler, and some preventative maintenance.
No plans to get out of the Juke any time soon its been a great vehicle for us so far. Just want to be ahead of the game so if there are any early warning signs of turbo or CVT malfunction that we let her go at that time before it is "too late". As more and more Jukes start to get up there in mileage you hear every couple of days somebody on the forum with the limp mode issue but it is reassuring that Gen2 got an upgraded CVT.
 

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So I'm the only guy who's turbo went out at 30k miles. Damn. Lol

Sent from my SM-N950U1 using Tapatalk
 

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That's good to hear. I drive a 2015 EVO X 5 speed manual with 400 h.p. and I still prefer the Juke AWD/CVT for daily driving. It sounds crazy, but the Juke AWD and short wheel base just make it a fun car. Hopefully you have many years of trouble free driving. The AMSOIL fluid change is highly recommended, I believe it's compatible with the NS3 Nissan fluid in the Gen2 transmissions but I have only experience on the Gen1 CVT. It'll keep the belt slippage to zero and will really help extend the life of the CVT. The external coolers are not a bad idea either but I'd consult someone with experience. Those (2) things make an enormous difference on a CVT. Good luck.
 

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.....................................

From your sig it shows you have a 2015, you potentially have the revised CVT transmission for the Gen2, the JF016E (CVT8). It has a couple of critical improvements over the Gen1 JF011E
So some 2015's have the revise CVT and some do not? How can we tell whether our '15 has a revised CVT? Are there some identifying marks that make it relatively simple to know?

Thanks
 

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Hmm,

Top of the transmission, pull the battery box off and there is a paper sticker or maybe at the differential side.
From the P/N I have which is the 3TX0C 2012 Juke AWD or the RE0F10B (JF011E) CVT2. The +2015
are different using the 3XV4D & 3XV6D or RE010D (JF016E) CVT8.

I believe WIT made a mistake calling the 3XV4D and 3XV6D the RE0F10B, it must be a typpo. Since the Altima
for sure run the JF016E (RE0F10D) and use the similar 3VX0A & 3VWX0A style numbers denoting the newer series CVT8.
Whereas the older Altima ran the older REF010A (JF011E) very similar to a Gen1 Juke, if not identical in most ways.

Until I see one torn down, not 100% sure but you can tell by the radical new Nissan P/N that it's a completely different transmission.
When you think about how radically changed the Gen2 motor is compared to a Gen1, it's a safe bet the transmission was also
revised to the newer CVT8 as the P/N seem to suggest.


188544


188545
 

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I lift my hood EVERY time I get home from driving to release the heat. It helps so much.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hmm,

Top of the transmission, pull the battery box off and there is a paper sticker or maybe at the differential side.
From the P/N I have which is the 3TX0C 2012 Juke AWD or the RE0F10B (JF011E) CVT2. The +2015
are different using the 3XV4D & 3XV6D or RE010D (JF016E) CVT8.

I believe WIT made a mistake calling the 3XV4D and 3XV6D the RE0F10B, it must be a typpo. Since the Altima
for sure run the JF016E (RE0F10D) and use the similar 3VX0A & 3VWX0A style numbers denoting the newer series CVT8.
Whereas the older Altima ran the older REF010A (JF011E) very similar to a Gen1 Juke, if not identical in most ways.

Until I see one torn down, not 100% sure but you can tell by the radical new Nissan P/N that it's a completely different transmission.
When you think about how radically changed the Gen2 motor is compared to a Gen1, it's a safe bet the transmission was also
revised to the newer CVT8 as the P/N seem to suggest.


View attachment 188544

View attachment 188545
So CVT2 is the first Gen CVT and CVT8 is the revised CVT. Weird how Nissan would run two different version CVT for the same model year.
 

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The FWD and AWD represent the (2) different PN or SKU, thats typical. One has the bolt mounting for the transfer case, the other doesn't.
 
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