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Discussion Starter · #421 ·
Thanks. Yep, most don’t touch the CVT but there are a few that have done it even with upgraded transmissions. Most have had failures In relatively short time when pushing these cars hard. Hopefully I can change.

The GTR hood is cool, definitely dresses it up. The BC coilovers look like a decent setup, the springs are tuneable for your setup. Definitely wheels and suspension will make a big impact. Even the braking system can use major improvement.

I’ll be around on the forums, not planning on goin anywhere...lol.
 

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Thanks. Yep, most don’t touch the CVT but there are a few that have done it even with upgraded transmissions. Most have had failures In relatively short time when pushing these cars hard. Hopefully I can change.

The GTR hood is cool, definitely dresses it up. The BC coilovers look like a decent setup, the springs are tuneable for your setup. Definitely wheels and suspension will make a big impact. Even the braking system can use major improvement.

I’ll be around on the forums, not planning on goin anywhere...lol.
LOL.. I just got home from my buddies house and I came around this bend with a nice straight away and nailed it from like a 15/20 roll in front wheel only, traction off and she got right up to a hundred fast.. I am very happy with the power now and you are right about the brakes also it was hard to keep her straight from like 20 on till I hit 3rd and like 50 miles an hr it smoothed out. I gotta fix the front struts, and I don't know weather to go OEM for now and just do rims and tires and save over the summer for Coil Over's. Or dig further into savings than I want too, gonna probably wait and wish I didn't.. LOL.. But now the car is parked for the rest of the week thank God. I work for the Cable Co. and drive a work van all week. So the car and the CVT gets preserved for weekends and even then I really don't go anywhere.. Knock on wood and a lot of drain and fills and she is still holding together. Got the CVT money saved but I hope I don't need it for another couple years.. Like I said I really only drive the car on weekends and even then I don't go far maybe like 25 miles a week on the car and I'm really not that hard on the car but today was one of those days where I wanted to see if I got my moneys worth out of these parts and the tune and I did, I can smile, I'm happy.. Once hot weather hits I drive it easier..
 

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Discussion Starter · #423 ·
I’m sure if you drive it a couple times a week it’ll last a lot longer. For daily driving I’d have the boost turned down a bit, then for having fun I’d crank it up a little. My EVO I kept the boost down to 21 psi and pretty much leave it there so I get used to it. Keeping the speeds down is really hard, but I would limit it to 30mph or below over the speed limit to avoid a felony charge as it’s just not worth it.

Having suspension/wheel/braking mods will help with that as it’ll change your driving style for the good. I have a very cool industrial park by me I can use almost as a short road course for suspension and braking and acceleration testing. Nobody around at night then a good 15 min run then back into the garage to give the car a short workout. Occasionally I’ll bust out a midnight expressway pull for some data logging but not much anymore as my cars are pretty well tuned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #424 · (Edited)
Not too many updates on this thread.

Main reason is I'm focusing on the engine build to avoid a huge mess with the transmission being taken back apart. The trans case will be removed and the Raybestos Hi-friction clutches installed, upgraded new oil pump added, and the input shaft machined for the reinforced clutch drum. Just taking my time as there is no rush, I have it all planned out. I could probably crank all that out in 2-3 days with taking my time but no point as I'm sitting on all the parts I need to make it happen.

That is about as far as I go with the Juke CVT. I finish this build then I start focusing on my EVO X and the Juke becomes a daily driver & hobby car which was the original intention. The custom CVT cooling system will happen shortly after the car is running, but the valvebody upgrade may wait awhile so I can just enjoy the car. Beyond that I am not going further on these transmissions as it isn't worth the effort anymore and it's too expensive. I thought long and hard and where I am currently is good enough for what I'm doing with this CVT. I could replicate the same upgrades for a reasonable amount for someone else based on what mine has currently and that IMHO is about as good as it gets.

Since I've started this thread I've lost count of the number of CVT owners who have broken their CVT. Not unlike the EVO X owner's with their SST dual clutch transmissions. Everything has a solution, and it's not only the CVT transmissions that fail. We'll see where things go from here.
 

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Not too many updates on this thread.

Main reason is I'm focusing on the engine build to avoid a huge mess with the transmission being taken back apart. The trans case will be removed and the Raybestos Hi-friction clutches installed, upgraded new oil pump added, and the input shaft machined for the reinforced clutch drum. Just taking my time as there is no rush, I have it all planned out. I could probably crank all that out in 2-3 days with taking my time but no point as I'm sitting on all the parts I need to make it happen.

That is about as far as I go with the Juke CVT. I finish this build then I start focusing on my EVO X and the Juke becomes a daily driver & hobby car which was the original intention. The custom CVT cooling system will happen shortly after the car is running, but the valvebody upgrade may wait awhile so I can just enjoy the car. Beyond that I am not going further on these transmissions as it isn't worth the effort anymore and it's too expensive. I thought long and hard and where I am currently is good enough for what I'm doing with this CVT. I could replicate the same upgrades for a reasonable amount for someone else based on what mine has currently and that IMHO is about as good as it gets.

Since I've started this thread I've lost count of the number of CVT owners who have broken their CVT. Not unlike the EVO X owner's with their SST dual clutch transmissions. Everything has a solution, and it's not only the CVT transmissions that fail. We'll see where things go from here.
Not too many updates on this thread.

Main reason is I'm focusing on the engine build to avoid a huge mess with the transmission being taken back apart. The trans case will be removed and the Raybestos Hi-friction clutches installed, upgraded new oil pump added, and the input shaft machined for the reinforced clutch drum. Just taking my time as there is no rush, I have it all planned out. I could probably crank all that out in 2-3 days with taking my time but no point as I'm sitting on all the parts I need to make it happen.

That is about as far as I go with the Juke CVT. I finish this build then I start focusing on my EVO X and the Juke becomes a daily driver & hobby car which was the original intention. The custom CVT cooling system will happen shortly after the car is running, but the valvebody upgrade may wait awhile so I can just enjoy the car. Beyond that I am not going further on these transmissions as it isn't worth the effort anymore and it's too expensive. I thought long and hard and where I am currently is good enough for what I'm doing with this CVT. I could replicate the same upgrades for a reasonable amount for someone else based on what mine has currently and that IMHO is about as good as it gets.

Since I've started this thread I've lost count of the number of CVT owners who have broken their CVT. Not unlike the EVO X owner's with their SST dual clutch transmissions. Everything has a solution, and it's not only the CVT transmissions that fail. We'll see where things go from here.
Well you went pretty far, further than anyone else I've seen so far with a CVT anyway..
 

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Discussion Starter · #427 ·
Thanks. Looking forward to finishing the project and enjoying the car. Updates shouldn't be too far out, just gotta get the motor built then the trans get's some attention and it'll be done. I'd have thought by now we would have had upgraded CVT available after 11 years, so I just took it upon myself to make that a reality. Kinda got sick of waiting around for a solution....lol.
 

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Wow I'm Blow away by your automotive Knowledge.. I'll tell you what you were dead on about the Amsoil for the CVT thats for sure.. There's a totally noticeable difference. That belt was slipping before..
 

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Discussion Starter · #429 ·
Lol.....AMSOIL is common knowledge......thought everyone knew about it. Probably about 20-25% more belt traction, there's a technical paper somewhere but my datalogs confirmed that. If it was slipping before than I'd say the CVT is on the edge so take care with it.
 

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LMAO, Because I'm so happy with result's.. But I didn't know really.. A lot of people on here say never use anything but NS2 or 3 depending on your year.. And on YouTube as well.. I had people scare me into thinking, I better never use anything other than NS2.. But I see the difference now definitely, especially after my last drain and fill. Like I said I took her on a little ride and nailed it from like a 15 roll and could barely keep her straight.. I do have to say, prior to the tune I have never felt that belt slip, and the CVT feels pretty healthy right now.. It's all about picking your battles. If you are always pedal to the floor don't expect your CVT to last even well maintained.. But if you drive normal and with the flow of traffic for the most part 90% of the time and do your drain and fills you can get these CVT's to last for over a hundred K, Depends on how much you drive and how hard..
 

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Discussion Starter · #431 ·
Well said. Normally I'd say never stray from the factory, but in this case I would. Even the WRX CVT guys are switching from the Subaru High Torque CVT fluid to AMSOIL with great results. NS2 is OK for a stock car, yours is practically a Ferrari now compared to a stock juke...lol. So you gotta run something a little more performance oriented. With the tune the clutches would have most likely been slipping or the belt, for sure.

Yeah the driving style is everything and how often you are hooning it. The CVT from a roll are fast, no doubt yours is quick with the power your dyno was showing. In CVT mode they are much faster than sport mode manual. The CVT always feel healthy right up until they don't, so just enjoy it while it lasts and then worry later I guess.
 

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This is my first post on this site. This thread is my whole reason for joining. No where else on the net have I found anything like this, on the topic of Nissan CVT's.
I am working on my daughters 2004 Murano, CVT and I suppose I should just start a thread on that. I just wanted to make sure pboglio would see it. You have done such a great job on this thread. I hope my memory of things I have read here and on other threads you posted in, is correct.
I have a few questions.
1 You said you used Loctite 518, did you use the primer?
2 Why 518 and not 515? The WIT video on youtube mentions 515, so I was going to use that.
3 How are you pressing the variators back together? Do you have one of the ratcheting arbor presses?

When I read about the drop in flow control valve I wanted to mention the buzz problem, with using it on the newer series transmission, but then I see you figured that out, I guess they are supposed to work better on the older version I'm working on. I'm new to the CVT's this is my first go at it. It is by far the worse vehicle and transmission ever to work on, I'll explain in my own thread. I have been researching these transmissions like crazy for the last few months, you have found and created a wealth of information on them. I sure agree about the factory design mistakes you mention.
 

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Discussion Starter · #434 ·
This is my first post on this site. This thread is my whole reason for joining. No where else on the net have I found anything like this, on the topic of Nissan CVT's.
I am working on my daughters 2004 Murano, CVT and I suppose I should just start a thread on that. I just wanted to make sure pboglio would see it. You have done such a great job on this thread. I hope my memory of things I have read here and on other threads you posted in, is correct.
I have a few questions.
1 You said you used Loctite 518, did you use the primer?
2 Why 518 and not 515? The WIT video on youtube mentions 515, so I was going to use that.
3 How are you pressing the variators back together? Do you have one of the ratcheting arbor presses?

When I read about the drop in flow control valve I wanted to mention the buzz problem, with using it on the newer series transmission, but then I see you figured that out, I guess they are supposed to work better on the older version I'm working on. I'm new to the CVT's this is my first go at it. It is by far the worse vehicle and transmission ever to work on, I'll explain in my own thread. I have been researching these transmissions like crazy for the last few months, you have found and created a wealth of information on them. I sure agree about the factory design mistakes you mention.
That's awesome, glad you are giving the CVT rebuild a shot. Thanks for the compliments. I'm glad my thread is helping you out. Most of what I found is first hand and piecing together hundreds of online resources to get the full picture.

1) Loctite 518 w/out Primer. Primer is for faster curing and higher bond strength on non-reactive materials like aluminum or stainless steel. For this application I'm not using it but it would help of course but not critical to this application.
2) I used 518 Loctite it's what Mcmaster had available. 515 and 518 are both Acrylic based anaerobic. Chemical resistance is almost identical, slight advantage for 515 but minor. Heat aging a very large advantage to 518 at 120*C of 130% bond strength @ 5000 hours vs. 75% bond strength for Loctite 515. This is kind of important since the material keeps getting stronger with heat exposure at this temperature whereas the Loctite 515 just get's weaker over time. I would run either one but still use Loctite 518. Henkel has the datasheets available on their website.
3) I'm using a 12 ton hydraulic press to re-install and a modified special tool I built for removal. I would go ahead and just buy a small bench top press that can handle about 12"-18" clearance.

The transgo oil pump relief valve is the one that causes buzzing. The internal ports are much too small and this is what causes the oil pump to cavitate. All the JF011E use the same style pumps, even the newer CVT had this pump design. There is a revised oil pump for later CVT that doesn't even use this valve, basically valve-less. Outwardly this pump is very close visually to the older pump but with revised impeller & suction port designs but not needing the relief valve. I ran out of time during CVT development to attempt to source this oil pump and retrofit that, but it would be a good choice for a retrofit. Nissan/Jatco knew the problem which is why they developed it. Future improvements. The Sonnax version I'm running is a hard anodize coat version and looks identical to the OE Nissan/Jatco, except with a couple of improvements. It's a big improvement over stock from what I've researched and easy to install but there are (2) versions: Standard for (new) oil pumps and Oversized for "reamed-overbore" used pumps.
 

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Thank you for the reply. I looked at those datasheets awhile back, I guess the main thing that swayed my decision to 515 was that it is approved by Lycoming aircraft engine manufacture as a crankcase assembly sealant. There must be a reason they didn't do the same for 518, I don't know. From what you say 518 sounds like the way to go, I already got 515 so will just use it if I get to that point lol.
Its been a battle. The "This Is Your Transmission" guy on youtube did an experiment with the drop in flow control valve in the version transmission I think you have and ended up with that buzz, he had also had done one in the REOF09A, the one I am working on and said it worked fine with no problems, I already got it cheap. The oil pump in the REOF09A does not have a chain drive and is more like the setup in most of the older style automatic transmissions maybe makes a difference? The "press" my problem is not having a good stable pressing set up etc., good old harbor freight, and so far made two mistakes pressing variators and had to fix the mess up, its caused by an unsquare condition at the final point of contact with the small hub and yes cocked the piston not good. I am using the Transtar kit, I have used them in the past, this one is the best I have seen, it even had the steel dowel pins along with the steel balls so you can choose which you wish to use in the variators. I had to use 320 emery and small lathe to sand them as they were right at 6mm and would fit too tight in the grooves, I was afraid if I forced them in then I may not get it apart again. The old balls mic'ed under 6mm, I don't have the numbers here now, I matched that diameter on the new pins and they fit perfect.

If I remember you changed the taper rollers and races in the case? How did you establish the preload? I also have the ATSG manual (I'd like to have the AAMCO one too?) for the JFO11E, on page 66 step #10, that is one of those just wow deals. As a retired machinist, aero space and other industries, as well as heavy industrial engines, and equipment mechanics, that is no way to attempt to check that dimension, they would get way closer using the top of the bar, and calipers are not the tool to use. So that is a heads up to anyone needing to take those measurements. Also this is an area where at least extra press in the case races are needed and of course dimensions checked for matching the axial length, as one of the races needs the OD reduced to easy slip in and out to establish the correct shim, because you sure don't want to think you have the correct shim and then press in a new race and then find out it has to be removed to correct the problem. So what should I do start another thread or add more to this one. I will likely have many more questions for you as well.
I'm glad you covered the surface finish of the variator pulley faces, I had one small area that had a bit of deposit on it and sanded it with I think 800 and then kinda lightly using 2000 grit emery before I found your post.
It looks like this CVT surface finish deal could take up a book? I'll add more on that later. I so fully agree with a post you made about "Rebuilt CVTs", the main thing no one thinks about is any big rebuilder of any device, will have many unskilled people doing some of the tasks, one outfit in this state is always advertising for help, the pay is lower than a hamburger flipper, and like mentioned many questionable parts are reused.
 

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Discussion Starter · #436 ·
-Either Loctite sealant will work, no doubt.
-The Transgo relies valve looks well made, but in retrospect the oil flow is much more restricted than my JF011e design. It might have worked but on mine it mostly would have buzzed. The REOF09A is run off the input shaft. Not sure about the pump design but it a gyrotor style vs. vane type. Possibly pump cavitation is less of an issue, but the JF011e are notorious for cavitating and that is probably the difference.
- Pressing requires a rigid setup. Also you want to be using WD40 or light oil otherwise things will not work out well. Also, you want to measure variator stack height BEFORE you took it apart. Then when you put it back together you know it was bottomed correctly during pressing operation. You’ll find out when you assemble and it wasn’t going together right.
-Transtar Kit or the Toledo Kit we’re good except the pulley Teflon gap rings weren’t the right OE design and leaked air like a sieve on the aircheck test. I flipped the original Teflon gap rings over and reused them as WIT recommend. I think the newer kits have the revised gap rings but you gotta make sure they are double overlap design and not single.
-The SAP pins I used were a tight fit but they slipped in fine. In fact some guys tack weld them in place but I’ll run them loose and see how it goes.
  • I’ll send you the AAMCO manual, it has the aircheck procedure for the JFO11e to check the variator for pressure leaks, might help you figure out how to do it on the 09 trans. I wouldn’t put it back together without airchecking the pulley case other wise you will be having a bad day tearing the transmission back off the car.
  • The taper roller bearing was on the differential only, I replaced 3 of the 4 I believe. I used the original bearing race shims. Keep in mind I measured the original bearing inner race to end shaft dimension using a drop gauge. The new ones pressed on within
.001” so basically the same stack height and thus preload. I’ve never had indication of unusual wear or roller skipping so I assume the factory nailed the preloads. This gets back to measuring the original bearing stacks on the shaft before removing everything. All other bearings on the primary and secondary are radial and don’t have preloads. Press these wrong and you are having a bad day, oiling helped tremendously here.
- What is also important is the Input shaft endplay and clutch pack endplay or stack clearances. I used selective bearings from Mitsubishi to get the input shaft endplay set correctly......special order from Japan. Clutch pack endplay i hand filed the clutch pack pressure plate to set the gap where I wanted since the factory set it so tightly, it didn’t match industry standard or the ATSG manual either. I also had several clutch pack snap rings with different thicknesses which also helped.
-You want nothing smoother than 400 grit surface finish. Smoother will slip and rougher will tear up the belt. Yep, a book could be written on the subject...lol.
  • Rebuilt CVT are junk if done by a factory. Already a couple members found this out the hard way. I’d trust WIT to do it, they have access to all the used hard parts to fix them correctly, plus all the rebuild kits and tooling. Skill level tough to say. I talked to a few guys from Europe who thought a local shop could fix their CVT and sent me pictures of the rebuild. When you see a CVT being rebuilt on a dirty shop floor....then you know it’s never going to work properly. Honestly it would be hit or miss. Being an engineer or machinist would make me feel better about the rebuild. Like I said if I didn’t do it myself WIT would be the few I would trust but honestly I have no reference point. I think 99% would fail to do it right unless you read the WIT handbook, ATSG handbook, and the AAMCO handbook and watched the WIT CVT tutorial you are probably safe.
  • Used parts have to be used from other transmissions if the damage is bad enough, no other options. Where and what to use is the trick. Sending parts out for x-ray or magnaflux might be the way to go in the forward clutch drum and input shaft, variators, etc. We do x-ray now at work so it’s an option for me in the future.
 

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Excellent idea about the stack length before disassembly, I didn't do that. But I am not replacing any of the variator support bearings they check okay, I'm not doing a top quality rebuild like you are, the main problem with this was P0868 code and yes the flow control valve is worn about .007 in the one area. Again with the stack length, something I really like on this 09 are the c washers that help hold the press fit of the variator pistons, so the only other stack issue on the primary is the bearing and retainer plate, and on the secondary is the park gear and transfer gear. Your mention of reusing the piston seals is what helped a bunch, since I did get the primary together finally, after that previously mentioned piston fiasco, with the Transtar kit seal, like you say mine leaked like crazy, but I did use some of the thick assembly goo to lube and hold it. Using a heat gun to heat the assy a bit helped the seal but it still had a leak. So when I attempted the secondary I used your advice and cleaned the old seal ring that has a very nice angled lap joint, used brake clean, then looked at it under a magnifying glass, I saw lots of very small metal particles imbedded in it. So I used some 800 and very lightly did that on the surface it did an okay job of removing most of the particles. I will end up doing the same on the primary. And I will only use transmission fluid to do the install, its best to only use either the fluid that will be in the transmission, or petroleum jelly (Vaseline), or transmission assembly jell.

Surface finish ? I'll try to find some of the other info I found and see what we can figure it out.

Does this match with what you where talking about in your thread about surface finish?


And what about this?


(Have to scroll down for this.)

Within the above five constraints, it was found that for achieving a high friction in the said frictional contact at the desired durability of the transmission, the following surface roughness specification applies to the running surface:

0.01 micron < Ra < 1 .0 micron,

■ Rsk < 0 micron,

with Ra and Rsk being defined in the (ISO) standard manner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #438 ·
Assembly jell is fine any where other than the clutch packs, they must be soaked in transmission oil for a few hours. The rebuild guides are pretty good there. The primary will have to be rebuilt with OE gap rings. Cobra transmission have the OE style double lap joint type gap rings as separate rebuild items, those might be a nice item to add to the rebuild kits. This is the make/break in these CVT rebuilds. Not a big fan of reusing seals but no choice at the time. WIT probably knew something everyone else didn’t. This is why IMHO most rebuilds fail, I’m almost sure now the piston variator gap rings in the kits have caused countless slipped belts. It almost caught me until I did the aircheck and was blown away by the amount of blow-by.

Surface finish is debatable. I used some NASA or military white paper on running/static friction of hardened steels as a double check for clamping requirments. I have some experience with designing running surfaces for dynamic seals and 400 is slick enough to slide nicely with lubricant, 220 grit tears up the dynamic seals, and 800 grit just glued the seals to the walls was so smooth.

I started with 220-320 and lost confidence in that level of grit. I feel the 400 is the sweet spot for traction/oil retention and wear. Smoother felt like ice as I tried 600-800 grit as well thinking back. I did a patent search on the cone friction surface profile and I’m about spot on. That is .23 micron using that table. The circular pattern is what I used by spinning the variator on its main bearing and hand sanding until I got about .0005-.001” runout. A lathe is best here, cutting only enough not to dip past the case hardening. It was hard as all get out so I know the hardness is still there.

Too smooth is bad, too rough tears the belt apart. The belt elements have teeth like a synchro to cut the oil boundary layer and clamp onto the bare metal. The oil is really just there for cooling and is formulated to help with traction to certain extent. Hope that makes sense. I designed torquewrenches and a mirror finish tore the metal cams to pieces. THe slightly rougher finishes lasted longer without microwelding at high contact reassures.
Too long to explain here and the friction Performanc depends on what metals are sliding against each other but I had limited options.
 

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I was just referencing the .01 micron in that patent?

"running surfaces for dynamic seals" so are you talking about the finish in the drum for the seals or for pulley faces?

Here is something else I found about abrasive grit etc.
You will need to scroll down to see the posting of the rest of this.
"For example: A 3 micron particle size would work out to 0.0001181 in inches. The reciprocal is 8,467, or about 8500 grit. "

You mentioned .23 micron, I guess I don't understand it too well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #440 ·
Yeah, forget the seal analogy as that is a bad example.

I've read a few 3rd party patents.....and I wouldn't trust them to be honest. I had the stock variator to compare and by no means was it Ra = .01 micron which would be close to 1600-2000 grit by the chart below. It was sort of a matte finish without being rough, hard to explain. 8500 grit would be insanely smooth. The stock variator isn't that smooth, it's not even shiny if you remove the CVT oil from the surface.

I used 400 grit, Ra = .12 micron, Ra = 4.7 microinch. I could be wrong, but not by much if you look below.

I'm targeting with CVT oil about a 0.09 coefficient of friction. With AMSOIL it's more like 0.11 or something like this, can't recall now as it's been so long but I have a big spreadsheet that includes these values for calculations. This value is almost impossible to exceed without going crazy rough on the variator surface which would never survive daily driving, thus there are limits to what can be done. Many have tried, but .09-.10 on standard CVT oil is about the practical limit. Jatco/Bosch tried about 0.16 using rougher surfaces.......and the CVT pushbelt didn't last too long. You can research what that might be in grit/Ra values but it has to be a lot rougher than 400 grit for sure. Having access to that information dictated the surface roughness I used. If I'm off, it's not by much.

Like I said, the CVT oil actually is there for cooling, most of it is metal-metal contact and you can see the same 0.09 mean coefficient of friction values in the tables below for steel-on-steel contact using a 5kn load applied on 2 plates. This value is nearly identical to Jatco/Bosch which DO list this in their literature and almost they can never exceed it with standard CVT oil. Their newest design pulley got about 0.10 coefficient of friction but the JF011E or the RE0F09A/B doesn't have that pulley. I'm stating directly from Jatco/Bosche technical papers. Thus, I know .09 coefficient of friction is about the best you can reliably achieve.......and a mill finish is the finish you need to achieve it. There are some differences between a cone sheave design with oil and (2) flat metal plates, but you get the idea.

See below, these charts are why I selected 400 grit. Mirror polishing would be a huge mistake on a CVT pulley, you can see the chart comparisons. I tried 220 grit, 320 grit, 400 grit, 600 grit, maybe 800 grit if I remember correctly. Above 600 grit it was slick as ice. The stock variator is more like a mill or turn finish and it's not slippery to the touch, sort of grippy but not rough either.

Line Font Parallel Slope Pattern


Rectangle Font Parallel Pattern Number


Font Material property Number Rectangle Parallel


Rectangle Parallel Font Pattern Drawing
 

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