Nissan Juke : Juke Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
hello all! I have a 2014 Juke S. It’s at 119,750 miles. A few weeks ago I noticed that when accelerating my car was making a whistle/whining noise coming from under the hood. After about a week I was on the freeway when my car stopped accelerating past 60 mph, 2.5 rpm. Flooring it and it would not speed up. So I pulled off, checked fluids and everything was fine but I noticed a burnt smell when the car came to a stop. Took it in, they said the air filter was on crooked and they fixed it. Solved the problem for another week then it started again. Took it back and they said it needed a cvt flush so we did that and it was working great. This was about 3 weeks ago but now I am noticing that smell coming back every time my car slows down after driving it for a few minutes. Any ideas? I’m pretty scared my transmission is going out and I still owe 7.8k on it, I’ve only had the car a year.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
91 Posts
This happens to mine once in a blue moon, has since I got the vehicle. I change my fluid regularly (every 8k approximately, sometimes as often as 5k) and at 45k miles and 5 years later my CVT works as good as it ever has. I'll get out of the car after driving hard on a hot day and I get a whiff of hot CVT fluid. I will say for me it's not a frequent occurrence though.

Knock on wood my CVT is going to explode tomorrow now since I said that lol

As for losing power on the interstate that would be the CVT going into protect mode because it got too hot. This happens at 100°c fluid temperature. This can happen due to bad fluid, or fluid being over/under filled which can cause it to become frothier than normal which reduces the fluids efficiency. Mine has gone into this mode a few times over the years after pushing the car hard for a long time, but never just while cruising on the interstate.

Fast religion may unfortunately be right. But I like to stick to the philosophy that a lot of CVT issues can be corrected by exchanging the fluid - though sometimes it can take two or three exchanges. A single exchange in our CVTs is effectively only giving you about 25% fresh fluid at most. If you've only done one exchange I'd recommend another. It's easy to do yourself don't let Nissan rip you off - buy a fluid extractor and suck as much as you can out of the CVT fill tube after getting the car hot. Replace the exact amount that came out with fresh. You can open the CVT drain pan bolt but since the exchange is best done frequently it saves time and stress just getting an extractor. The extractor makes it easy to measure exactly how much you removed as well.

I do this religiously because I firmly believe the CVT is a highly reliable mechanism that will last a long time if you keep it running on clean, fresh fluid. It's such a simple transmission if you think about it - just a steel belt, some steel pulleys, and some pumps; and all of the fail points fail because of issues derived from fluid not being fresh. If you keep fresh fluid in there things wear very slowly compared to a planetary gear or double clutch transmission which are both much more intricate and with way more possible fail points.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,527 Posts
Yes it is complex but actually simple when you get down to it.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top