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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't know who could possibly benefit from this information, but I have successfully installed the subframe lift that I have been researching and working on for over a year now. The main goal of this kind of lift is to lower the drivetrain and suspension components, sacrificing some ground clearance for better clearance between the tires and fenders. This could be a possible alternative if someone wants to lift and fit larger tires to their Juke, but would prefer to keep their suspension geometry closer to stock configuration.

Cool things about this install:
The engine stays in the vehicle the whole time and can be held in place temporarily by installing the engine mount bolts first and lowering the subframe into position with a standard car jack.
You don't have to take off the bumper, since it's mounted to the radiator core support and not the subframe
Stock coolant hoses, intercooler hoses and engine wiring harness are all fine with the 2" drop.
The stock airbox gets mounted a little wonky but still works just fine
Didn't have to drain coolant! A lot of comparable Subaru subframe lifts require you to disconnect the radiator, not necessary on the Juke!

Annoying things about this install:
Have to custom weld an extended intermediate steering shaft, and found out there are two different part numbers that are not cross-compatible-
480801KA0A which is for most Jukes, and 480801KA0B which has a higher spline count where it connects to the steering column and is from RS Jukes?
Currently the extended steering shaft sticks out the bottom of the floor to connect to the steering rack, and for now is just exposed to the elements because I have to figure out a new cap for it.
The bolt for the steering column just barely sticks out past the floor and has to be accessed from the bottom of the body, if the lift were 1/4" less, it would be impossible to unbolt.
The rear two mounts for the subframe get located onto the chassis with a conical indentation, which has to be drilled/machined out of the aluminum spacers to be installed correctly. (You could also have the tops of the spacers machined for superior fitment and shear protection)
The extended bolts for the front of the subframe are so long that manufacturers only offer them in titanium and they are a whopping $37 a piece

My overall lift is still around 2.5", although this would allow me to reach nearly 5" of total lift, but it would be putting my brake lines and ABS cables in dangerous positions, and that's some extra problem solving for another day. I also plan to space the rear subframe and trailing arms by the same amount which should finally free up some room to get the rear camber out of the positive and finally break that 3" number on the back that's almost impossible to reach with the stock geometry. Big goals for a tiny car!

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I don't have a better image at the moment, but you can just barely see the subframe sticking out below the level of the lower bumper fascia, with the glimmer of those titanium bolt heads sticking out which are oh so very expensive

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The spacers on the passenger side engine mount are probably my favorite visual component that resulted from the lift

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Fantastic job! That's a legit set-up for sure! Now for some detachable sway bar links, then youll be all sorts of off road legit.
 

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Love this!

I think lifting Juke's is honestly the coolest thing. Have thought about lifting mine for like a year now and just putting a tow hitch on it and towing my motorcycle around places.
 

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@Jaxxa does it again.

You need more power now......
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
@Jaxxa does it again.

You need more power now......
More power would be awesome, but once the transmission gets over 195 F it starts to cut power anyway to keep itself cool, so on long trips I'm pretty sure all it's gonna do try to fry my CVT. I think I'm just gonna let it do it's thing for a while until this transmission fully kicks the bucket, or something cool happens with @FlannelFairlady 's AWD manual swap
 

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More power would be awesome, but once the transmission gets over 195 F it starts to cut power anyway to keep itself cool, so on long trips I'm pretty sure all it's gonna do try to fry my CVT. I think I'm just gonna let it do it's thing for a while until this transmission fully kicks the bucket, or something cool happens with @FlannelFairlady 's AWD manual swap
You could buy a 6 speed. Jack her up in more ways than one. But yea we all want that conversion to be successful.
 

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Waste of time with 6spd as no more AWD. Wouldn't bother
I beg to differ. Some really good off road grippy tires and she will rocket through what most people drive in off road. This AWD system aint gonna rock crawl.......
 

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2014 awd cvt
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Too true. There was a old guy when i was young who only drove a big old ford falcon. Rear wheel drive. Used to teach bush driving and sand driving. Could go anywhere with 2 wheel drive. Didnt need 4wd/awd. He was the exception to the rule. U can do most of what people call 4wd in 2wd, just drive accordingly. We have a huge sand island called Fraser Island i have driven 90% of that is 2wd, only need 4wd to get on and off the barges thru soft sand. So i agree with u but still like to keep the awd👍
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Update: Another 3 day weekend holiday came along so I felt confident that I could finally get the rear spacers installed, along with the long overdue spring upgrade I bought way back when I first got my coilover lift 2 years ago.

The install process was basically the same as the front, but now I have to deal with old hard bushings that made it kind of a pain to line up the bolt holes for the trailing arms, but once those were installed it ended up locating the subframe nicely for its spacers to go in. Similar to the front, the rear subframe has indents on one end that register into the body, so again I just drilled out a cone shape in the spacer for it to sit properly.

Somewhat surprisingly, I couldn't get the stock spring out until I had completely dropped the trailing arm (mostly because I didn't think to get spring clamps) but in doing so I realized a couple reasons why the ride in the back has been somewhat harsh: with the Tema4x4 spacers installed, it put something like 2 or 3 inches of preload on the spring which made it feel harder than it needed to, and also my rear shock was adjusted to have only like 2" of uptravel? I definitely don't remember setting them like that, but pretty much for what I can assume is for the past 2 years, any obstacle over 2" would have completely bottomed out my shocks LMAO I have literally caught air in this thing before, so I'm just amazed these things aren't totally busted. I probably should upgrade to 8" or 10" shocks in the rear since the amount of travel I can get now should be pretty absurd.
I could never find info on the stock springs, they are about 9" and I think roughly in the ball park of 300 lb/in, I swapped in 10" 350lb/in springs and set the spring perches to 1" and it sits basically where I had it before (stock springs, 45mm Tema spacers (which actually measure 2 3/8") ), so this was a really elaborate way for me to get absolutely no lift, lol, but of course it sets me up for a higher suspension lift in the future. And on the bright side, my rear camber is actually in the negative for the first time in like 3 years, since 2"+ of lift maxes out the toe/camber adjustment.

I figured I could just use the same smaller size bolts of the front subframe, but it turns out they were about an inch too long and didn't have enough thread engagement, so that is why two of the bolts have additional spacers.
There's been a lot of debate online using HDPE for spacers, but considering people hack together lifts all the time out of hockey pucks and cutting boards, I feel like it's sufficient. Feels fairly good so far having driven it aggressively on the street the past couple days. Can't really complain.
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Awesome idea in the grand scheme of things. I think the HDPE is great idea but having some blocks of aluminum mite be worth it in the long run ? Time will tell.
 
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