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Discussion Starter #1
Question. So I received the CAI from 2jracing. And it seems pretty straight forward to install.. But it comes with 4 different clamps of 2 different sizes.. I'm not exactly sure where to put them. Or are they optional to replace other clamps. Please
190105
advise. Thank you
 

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This is a versatile intake. It can function as a SRI or a CAI. You have the correct couplers and where they should be but it looks like you are missing a large clamp. You need two clamps at the couplers to make it into a CAI and you need a big coupler at the filter.

If you run a SRI. Then you just need the small one and a large one.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
This is a versatile intake. It can function as a SRI or a CAI. You have the correct couplers and where they should be but it looks like you are missing a large clamp. You need two clamps at the couplers to make it into a CAI and you need a big coupler at the filter.

If you run a SRI. Then you just need the small one and a large one.
Filter does have the couple. However.. The bigger two big ones seem a bit loose.. And I can't seem to tighten them more.. Do I need 2 clamps at each couplers?
190106
 

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Discussion Starter #4
190107
It has a little rubber piece at the end that doesn't allow me to move it more.. Granted. I'm just hand tightening for now just to see how everything goes. Just don't want to mess anything up. As you can see on the right one I still have room to turn it more.
190108
 

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Those are called nylon lock nuts. You have to use a ratchet or power tool to tighten them. It stops the nut from vibrating out after it has been tightened. You cannot thread them on by hand, unless you are Superman, or The Mountain.
 

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Go SRI, little more whoooosh noise and less chance of moisture in the intake. $0.02.
 

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Finished the install.. Took me awhile cause my 10 mm fell down in the engine bay and took forever to get it out. This is my first performance install on the juke. 😁
190112
 

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Pic had 4 clamps. In actuality. Had 5. ;)
 

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Go SRI, little more whoooosh noise and less chance of moisture in the intake. $0.02.
A CAI just seems to be better in my experience. I had the Injen SRI followed by the K&N Typhoon SRI. I hated the Injen it fit like crap and was poorly molded and I didn't like how it sounded. The K&N was cool but it was basically just strapping a filter directly to the turbo and I felt like on hot days it bogged down a lot though it sounded awesome.

Got the Nismo CAI, which is just the AEM with a different filter, and have been really happy with the performance. It's more consistent is the way to put it, not necessarily more power. It's still plenty loud and I think produces a more pleasing traditional turbo noise.

You're right about water though. I gotta be careful where I shoot the sprayer when washing the car or I soak the filter and it bogs down when I leave. Seems totally fine in the rain though.

But yeah, IMO a CAI seems to make the car a bit happier.
 

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It has been scientifically proven that a cold air is no better than a short ram on a turbocharged car. Along with dozens of other tests people have down, I put a juke on a dyno and tested it myself. OEM, SRI, CAI all did exactly the same torque and horsepower. They also all produce the same IAT's. SRI's are safer, and just as tune-able as CAI's. I can provide video footage of the tests being conducted along with overlapping dyno graphs of all 9 pulls of all three intakes.
 

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It has been scientifically proven that a cold air is no better than a short ram on a turbocharged car. Along with dozens of other tests people have down, I put a juke on a dyno and tested it myself. OEM, SRI, CAI all did exactly the same torque and horsepower. They also all produce the same IAT's. SRI's are safer, and just as tune-able as CAI's. I can provide video footage of the tests being conducted along with overlapping dyno graphs of all 9 pulls of all three intakes.
Oh I know. That's why I said it's not better just more consistent. Throttle response in a larger variety of situations seems to be better when the CAI - hot out, cold out, warm engine, cold engine. The engine responds the same pull after pull, with the SRI power delivery seemed to vary slightly more across RPMs, sometimes it'd be higher or lower, etc. Namely like I said after driving around for a while on a hot day the Typhoon in particular would seem to bog down sometimes.

The difference is minor but the CAI is more consistently getting air of the same temperature. It was noticeable enough that I picked up on it within the first drive with the CAI.


There is definitely a difference, but it is small and varies. Be nice to be and to test in a variety of ambient air temperatures and engine bay temperatures but that is impractical.
 

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Dyno is not the road. Get a good 85*F run in stop-go traffic for 30 minutes and report back on the SRI performance over a CAI. Check the ignition timing at WOT and A/F ratio. The factory is a CAI, Nissan and every other OEM know exactly what they are doing.

The hotter air is going to limit the compressor and how much airflow it can move. The SRI also is prone to radiator jet wash which affects the idle stability. The high MAF intake temps also start pushing the ECM's idea of what ignition timing and A/F to start using and it'll start derating.

The Juke plastic intake manifold is the only thing allowing an SRI to even work, otherwise if it had an aluminum intake manifold the power loss would be brutal. That doesn't mean you should run an SRI though.

I run a CAI on my EVO X and the difference over running it in SRI mode is enormous on a hot day. The aluminum intake manifold causes the IAT to skyrocket after a good heat soak, the AMS intercooler has trouble dealing with it due to the re-heat problem. I even run (2) generous sized radiator hood vents and it still doesn't matter. Wanting to max the stock turbo is impossible on an SRI, only a CAI has a chance to get another 15-20 h.p. out of the compressor. A well designed CAI with larger than 3" intake piping is the way to go, more like 3.5" would be preferred and 4" better. Yes, I did IAT, rolling road dyno power/torque, datalogs, Mangnahelic pressure taps at the front of the intake filter box, you name it. It doesn't get more scientific than that.

On the Juke I ran SRI but the power gains are better than the massive stock CAI restriction, that doesn't mean a properly optimized CAI won't be better. The trick is to keep upsizing the CAI intake plumbing as the horsepower increases and optimize the feed location to make it crush an SRI.

I'll be running the 2J CAI but I might be upsizing the 2nd pipe as 3" pipe that length is way the heck too restrictive for a 300-350 h.p. car.
 

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We just finished development on a carbon SRI for the juke and sentra. It went through 700+ miles of datalogging in all sorts of driving conditions. We compared ALL of those numbers to the ones brought in by the OEM intake. Not once did we see IAT's reach over what stock would produce. When we did the dyno testing the hood was closed during all pulls, and the car would idle for 5 minutes between each pull. This would simulate sitting at a stop in traffic or driving in the city, again no difference in over-all IAT's. Your right, the dyno is not the road, but considering you can't actually tell if a vehicle is actually performing better on the road, it is the most accurate way to tell if a modification is making a difference. It disproved the dyno numbers some manufacturers are saying they are getting by adding an intake. "Feeling" better performance does not PROVE better performance. A butt dyno is influenced by way too much to be trusted as a performance benchmark. Even If, big if there, a CAI made intake temps 10* lower pre-turbo, that only translates to a degree or two post intercooler, which is not anywhere near enough to make a difference on over-all performance. You need significant air temperature reduction to have an influence on over-all performance. The ECU uses the temp sensor located in the MAP sensor to determine timing. It uses a comparison of the MAF IAT sensor and the MAP IAT sensor's to determine if the turbocharger system is working as it should.

As for oem intakes being cold air: This is not accurate. If you look at the oem ducting, it grabs air from the on top of/next to the headlight area, just 4-5" away from where the air filter on an injen/FR/2j SRI sits. Your telling me that that 4-5" sideways make it a cold air intake? OEM's position intakes to get fresh air, yes, but they are more concerned with preventing fluid from getting into the intake system than anything, thus why the OEM ducting does a full 180* turn with a venturi style extension on the bottom, designed to catch moisture if it gets into the intake tubing.

I have built and tuned cold air big turbo, short ram big turbo, and even for giggles we once did an oem air box with a big turbo. There has been literally no difference in performance between SRI and CAI with the same sized turbos. The oem airbox did have trouble breathing past 275, the suction on the accordion part was too much and was making it collapse, it was quite funny to watch.

I have also been testing metal intake manifolds on these cars for over a year now. We have three test cars out there. They have ALL produced more torque more consistently over the plastic manifold. We have also tested the air temps on these manifolds under load. None of them have produced higher intake temps over the oem manifold.

Comparing data from your performance oriented EVO that has a larger frame turbo compared to engine size than the econo engine the Juke comes with is by no means a fair comparison. You are talking a car that was packaged with oem performance in mind vs a car that was packaged with just fitting it into the car in mind. But hey, you do you. I am going to stick to using data I have collected building dozens of these cars, and the testing I have done over the past 8 years.
 
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